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Old 02-10-2013, 03:40 PM
 
141 posts, read 233,426 times
Reputation: 157

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Young people are so anxious to move to NYC. They don't have any job skills or if they do, those skills are in areas that pay very low and they're dozens of people in the field that are much more talented than they are.(i.e.-writers)


Work on your career where you are. Build up your skills so that they are sought after in any city, save money. If you're 24y/o, by the time you reach 40, you'll have plenty of money, a great resume and more than likely, lots of contacts in your field. With those tools in your "toolbox", you would more than likely have a easier transition into the city. Than, you can live in NYC very comfortably, without roommates.



Adults(over 30) have to get to a place in life where living with another person(roommate) is not acceptable nor is it cute at the age of 30 or older. Nothing cute about being 35 and having 2 roommates.

You're not in college anymore(assuming you went). If you're living in NYC with roommates, YOU CAN'T AFFORD IT! Accept that. Doesn't mean you cannot afford it in the future. I've been wanting to move to NYC since I was in college, 20 years ago. I'm 39 now and I have worked, saved and created a nice career for myself in a very good field, with contacts in the Northeastern/New England area.

NOW, I can move there, get a NICE place in a nice area, secure great position(job) and live a great lifestyle as a result of a high paying position. In addition, still be able to save/invest for the golden years.

Even if you don't make it there until you're 45, at least you know you'll not have to struggle


NYC isn't going anywhere. GET YOU TOGETHER first, than make a move.

You can always vist once or twice a year while you're working on your game plan.

Last edited by R.J. Kencade; 02-10-2013 at 04:06 PM..
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Old 02-10-2013, 03:53 PM
 
15,457 posts, read 15,429,065 times
Reputation: 21705
Sorry, but I disagree on multiple points. You seem to think there's something wrong with both not having a big money-making skill or with having a roommate. The life-blood of NYC comes not from successful middle-aged people moving here, but from eager "unskilled" college grads, who flood into the city and get entry level jobs in publishing, the arts, advertising, etc., and rise through the ranks. And having a roommate isn't a shameful, degrading experience, but a great way to start your life here as a newcomer, ideally with someone who you'll pal around with and learn from.
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Old 02-10-2013, 04:07 PM
 
141 posts, read 233,426 times
Reputation: 157
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cida View Post
Sorry, but I disagree on multiple points. You seem to think there's something wrong with both not having a big money-making skill or with having a roommate. The life-blood of NYC comes not from successful middle-aged people moving here, but from eager "unskilled" college grads, who flood into the city and get entry level jobs in publishing, the arts, advertising, etc., and rise through the ranks. And having a roommate isn't a shameful, degrading experience, but a great way to start your life here as a newcomer, ideally with someone who you'll pal around with and learn from.

I don't care if you disagree.
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Old 02-10-2013, 04:16 PM
 
3,327 posts, read 4,334,860 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Cida View Post
Sorry, but I disagree on multiple points. You seem to think there's something wrong with both not having a big money-making skill or with having a roommate. The life-blood of NYC comes not from successful middle-aged people moving here, but from eager "unskilled" college grads, who flood into the city and get entry level jobs in publishing, the arts, advertising, etc., and rise through the ranks. And having a roommate isn't a shameful, degrading experience, but a great way to start your life here as a newcomer, ideally with someone who you'll pal around with and learn from.
Nonsense.

This was true in the 80's and 90's but no longer holds true today.

On average, NYC is no longer the city where one can come and work from the bottom up. That used to be the case across a wide array of industries in this city ( Finance, Journalism, Manufacturing, etc) but the best way to make it in NYC nowadays, is to already have made it someplace else.

The vast majority of unskilled or poor/no experience college grads who arrive in NYC wash out. I've seen it myself. The same story over and over. Many jobs at the lower levels are simply dead end nowadays. Companies aren't looking to promote. The key to make it higher is too start in the middle.

At my own place of employment, we've had 4 of these folks come and go in a span of 3 years. They were cool people but they realized that trying to make it in NYC from the bottom was a poor proposition. The drawbacks outweigh the rewards.

There are fewer and fewer positions where one can work his way up. You need to come in already skilled/educated. That's simply the economy nowadays and this is amplified even more in NYC.

I have countless stories of older folks who work for major corps in NYC who started in the mail room (not a joke; this used to happen regularly) or as lowly assistants and made it into good positions. Among the younger set, I literally know of only 1 person who has the same story. One. This is purely anecdotal but I believe it's indicative of a larger trend.
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Old 02-10-2013, 04:31 PM
 
Location: New York, New York
25 posts, read 53,088 times
Reputation: 20
It's not as black and white as that. Some people need stability and financial security to be happy. But to some "young folks" out there, it is more about the experience than the success. If they want to work their butts off as a bartender and split an apartment with 2-3 other people in order to live in NYC then so be it. These are the people that don't mind living pay check to pay check because they care more about living it up while they are young.
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Old 02-10-2013, 04:36 PM
 
241 posts, read 371,930 times
Reputation: 254
What is with this forum and trying to dissuade people from moving to NYC? Other city data forums aren't like this, even for other expensive cities. Why do you care?
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Old 02-10-2013, 04:47 PM
 
Location: Santa Monica, CA & Manhattan, NY
170 posts, read 321,772 times
Reputation: 130
Quote:
Originally Posted by R.J. Kencade View Post
I've been wanting to move to NYC since I was in college, 20 years ago. I'm 39 now and I have worked, saved and created a nice career for myself in a very good field, with contacts in the Northeastern/New England area.

NOW, I can move there, get a NICE place in a nice area, secure great position(job) and live a great lifestyle as a result of a high paying position. In addition, still be able to save/invest for the golden years.

Even if you don't make it there until you're 45, at least you know you'll not have to struggle


NYC isn't going anywhere. GET YOU TOGETHER first, than make a move.

You can always vist once or twice a year while you're working on your game plan.
True about NYC not going anywhere, because it isn't.

BUT

There is something to be said about moving to NYC at 18-24. I've read many articles, blogs, and comments pronouncing this the perfect age range. Moving to NYC when you do have money is not the same at all. My cousins and friends moved when they were all 21-23 and they love it. They were struggling financially, but admitted to being young enough to enjoy the city.

And like the above poster typed up, I too fail to understand why this forum seems to be filled with more discouraging remarks than the other CD forums. Is NYC really that important to make people stop others from coming?
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Old 02-10-2013, 04:53 PM
 
105,676 posts, read 107,645,851 times
Reputation: 79318
I will add it is an individual thing. Those that will be succesful will find a way ,those that won' t find away will fail.
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Old 02-10-2013, 04:58 PM
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11,395 posts, read 13,329,124 times
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Rent is so high in NYC that many of us can't even entertain the idea of living there. I'm moving to LA next week first, then hopefully I can head to NYC a few years down the line.
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Old 02-10-2013, 04:58 PM
 
22 posts, read 89,330 times
Reputation: 13
I normally don't post on here, but felt compelled to respond.

Couple points:
1) A younger 20-some year old is not going to comprehend nor care about the well-reasoned logic of the OP's argument. If the "young folk's" mind is set on moving out here, he/she will move out here if they have the bare minimum resources to make it. Trust me, I was the same fresh out of college kid w/ minimal/no experience 5 years ago.

2) The other point I'd like to make is that it's definitely possible to make it out here. It might just be the field that I'm in, but you can just as easily develop your career, extend your contact network, etc. etc.. I started with a modest NYC income, living in a 6' x 8' bedroom with no closet, to living in a fairly comfortable and spacious 1-bedroom within a few years. Not saying I'm living the high life, but I don't think it's fair to make the generalization that starting your career in NYC is an imprudent choice.

Bottom line: It's definitely not a guarantee, but you can make it out here. Yes, you will have to make sacrifices or trade-offs that people in 95% of the US do not even have to think about. But if you're going to be this risk-averse in your 20's, who's to say that you'll make the move out here in your 30's or 40's when you have a family, kids and a mortgage to worry about?

(wow, can't believe I sound like a salesman for NYC)
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