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Old 01-26-2008, 09:00 PM
 
12,919 posts, read 15,121,159 times
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Are there many one-story buildings in Manhattan?

I was watching a movie where a guy goes into a diner, one of the old-fashioned steel-car buildings.

It seems like property would be really expensive in Manhattan, and that you would not expect to find a dinky little building like that anywere.

I've never been to NY so it's hard to picture. The diners I imagine in Manhattan would be located on the ground floor of a much larger building, just like I would expect all the other little shops to be.
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Old 01-26-2008, 11:31 PM
 
Location: Now in Houston!
922 posts, read 3,684,739 times
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Those old diners are vanishing relics from an earlier era.

You might have seen one of the well-known diners which have been featured in several movies:

The Empire Diner (seen in Men in Black and Manhattan)
http://www.timeout.com/newyork/resizeImage/htdocs/export_images/619/619.x600.Seek2.Art.1.jpg?width=190 (broken link)

And the Moondance Diner (seen in Spiderman, Friends and Sex and the City)


Regarding your observation about real estate value of these buildings: The opposite is true. The land is actually relatively cheap because a tall expensive building is not already there, which allows developers to acquire the land in order to build tall buildings. This is why these one-story buildings are disappearing.

In fact, the Moondance was closed down last summer because the land was bought by a developer for high-rise condos. The diner building was not demolished, but moved to a museum in Pennsylvania.
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Old 01-26-2008, 11:45 PM
 
Location: Pawleys Island, SC
1,696 posts, read 8,516,655 times
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wasn't there a bar (Clarks?) on second or third ave that refused sell out to developers and they built these huge office towers around it?

I guess Smith & Wollensky's is another place like that too.
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Old 01-27-2008, 12:14 AM
 
Location: Now in Houston!
922 posts, read 3,684,739 times
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Quote:
wasn't there a bar (Clarks?) on second or third ave that refused sell out to developers and they built these huge office towers around it?
I saw that somewhere in the last week or so. I remember a bizarre picture of an office building that was constructed around and on top of a small 2-story building.

I wish I could remember where I saw that and post a link to the pic.
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Old 01-27-2008, 01:55 AM
 
Location: UWS -- Lucky Me!
757 posts, read 3,209,942 times
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NYC buildings below a certain height and depending on the neighborhood may have air rights that are more valuble than the actual land they sit on. Unless, that is, they haven't sold them already.
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Old 01-27-2008, 09:35 AM
 
12,919 posts, read 15,121,159 times
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So, does this mean that the land must have been bought so long ago that it was cheap at the time?

By the way, the movie I saw was "After Hours." The Martin Scorcese film.
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Old 01-27-2008, 09:44 AM
 
Location: Pawleys Island, SC
1,696 posts, read 8,516,655 times
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If I remember this correctly from my real estate classes, buildings in NYC are only supposed to be a certian height by the land zoning rules. But if a building is shorter than what is allowable the surrounding buildings may purchase the unused space and build higher than they would normally be allowed.

Air rights - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
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Old 01-28-2008, 09:27 AM
 
Location: Newton, Mass.
2,954 posts, read 11,694,357 times
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I work in the building with P.J. Clarke's. Here is a picture of that. There was talk of demolishing it when the office building went up but it was saved. It's 2 stories though.

PJ Clarke's In Full on Flickr - Photo Sharing! (http://www.flickr.com/photos/midweekpost/167397530/ - broken link)
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