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Old 05-30-2019, 03:47 PM
 
Location: PVB
3,884 posts, read 2,100,990 times
Reputation: 4469

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This is a very informative article about how NYC goes about transportation infrastructure projects:

Why Is Infrastructure So Expensive to Build in New York?
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Old 05-30-2019, 04:13 PM
 
Location: Lower East Side, NYC temporarily Tokyo, Japan
2,634 posts, read 1,741,938 times
Reputation: 2032
I get some sense that we're so f**cked.
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Old 05-30-2019, 05:35 PM
 
1,015 posts, read 821,487 times
Reputation: 897
It’s absolutely awful how this government does absolutely nothing to expand or maintain infrastructure. Instead the city government is obsessed with rezoning and tax cuts to subsidize more new luxury condos
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Old 05-30-2019, 07:38 PM
 
11,098 posts, read 10,242,859 times
Reputation: 14402
WTF? NYC is chock-full of nice things: The jewel-like Frick museum, great French restaurants, St. Patrick's cathedral, Philharmonic concerts in Central Park, people who pick you up when you fall, sample sales for cheap winter coats, Manhattanhenge at sunset, Film Forum retrospectives, an abundance of newspapers, heirloom tomatoes at greenmarkets, dollar pizza.

Okay, we may have problems with infrastructure projects, but that's NOT the same and not having "nice things." He needs a new title.

But thanks for the article.
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Old 05-30-2019, 07:46 PM
 
Location: Earth
5,811 posts, read 3,773,795 times
Reputation: 4365
Quote:
Originally Posted by Javawood View Post
I get some sense that we're so f**cked.

you could be right
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Old 05-30-2019, 08:11 PM
 
Location: Squirrel Tree
1,199 posts, read 379,223 times
Reputation: 495
The reason we can't have nice things is not just because of left wing, blue state union related BS, but also due to massive corruption. The same is true of Chicago to less of an extent. I used to think it was just liberalism but the south is also messed up. That's why California often has nicer things than us despite being more liberal.
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Old 05-30-2019, 11:05 PM
 
462 posts, read 236,363 times
Reputation: 470
This is a very telling article, piercing through a web of power abuses, and zooming in on the lack of accountability as both an excuse and a basis for 'rinse and repeat' of similar conduct.

I think in cities like Madrid, where recently the cost to build an entire subway station was only 14mil USD, there's more of "we're in this together" feeling that pulls people in in a proud way.

Whereas here, the workers are disgruntled, the agency is opaque, unaccountable, disjointed, weak and without any bold vision. I don't get the feeling of cohesiveness in the MTA.
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Old 05-31-2019, 04:55 AM
 
34,360 posts, read 35,082,441 times
Reputation: 16125
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cida View Post
NYC is chock-full of nice things: The jewel-like Frick museum, great French restaurants, St. Patrick's cathedral, Philharmonic concerts in Central Park, people who pick you up when you fall, sample sales for cheap winter coats, Manhattanhenge at sunset, Film Forum retrospectives, an abundance of newspapers, heirloom tomatoes at greenmarkets, dollar pizza.

Okay, we may have problems with infrastructure projects, but that's NOT the same and not having "nice things." He needs a new title.

Agreed!
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Old 05-31-2019, 05:00 AM
 
Location: Chicago
6,360 posts, read 7,154,591 times
Reputation: 5735
Quote:
Originally Posted by speediestevie View Post
This is a very telling article, piercing through a web of power abuses, and zooming in on the lack of accountability as both an excuse and a basis for 'rinse and repeat' of similar conduct.

I think in cities like Madrid, where recently the cost to build an entire subway station was only 14mil USD, there's more of "we're in this together" feeling that pulls people in in a proud way.

Whereas here, the workers are disgruntled, the agency is opaque, unaccountable, disjointed, weak and without any bold vision. I don't get the feeling of cohesiveness in the MTA.
It is not a New York issue that there is no "we're in this together" attitude. New York is (I believe) still part of the United States and there is no "we're in this together" attitude in this nation. Anywhere. Period.

The US has been characterized as a nation where one third of the population would like to kill another third while the last third stands by and watches and does nothing. I think that sums things up perfectly.

European nations with a relatively high degree of homogeneity, where the long lasting bonds of people and place operate in a different sphere from Americans. And nations where the economic range from wealthiest to poorest is the most minuscule have the greatest sense of peoplehood and oneness (i.e. Scandinavian nations). And when you have the widest of swings of income inequality like in the US, the commons become uncommons. The wealthier we get, the more the infrastructure goes to hell.

If New York was ever a "city of its own", a city of its people, a city with a true sense of place (and I believe to a degree it was), it is no longer. New York belongs to the globe it purportedly is capital of. New York, obviously Manhattan more than elsewhere, is merely a platform at the peak of the global network. New York is not a place to live, New York is a place to transfer into and transfer out. You don't live in New York; you plug into and out of New York.

It is perfectly logical that in a city where condos priced at $gazillion each into and beyond the clouds on a base with a footprint the size of shoe box tower and cast shadows over Central Park, arguably New York's greatest contribution to the commons, to we're all in it together as well as the soulless, cold dead, exclusive monolith of Hudson Yards leaves nearby Rockefeller Center, a relic of a more sense-of-place and equalitarian society reside in a city that can't spare a cent to bring its subway infrastructure up to 20th century standards (and, no, that wasn't a mistake....20th century would look good for the NYC subway system)

The irony of it all is that the more successful a city is, the more wealth it accumulates within its city limits, the more desirable it becomes.........all that.....they worse that city is. Success in today's market driven sense is the death knoll of any city. The more successful, the least desirable in so many ways.

It might be harder to see that if you can't see the forested megatalls of Manhattan from the brownstones trees of the neighborhoods, so its easier to get a perspective by looking elsewhere.

Like, San Francisco........remember that quirky, non-conformist, tolerant sense-of-place, sense-of-scale city of decades ago? Then look at the corporate, unaffordable, playground for the reach, techie dominated (somehow they seem to fit with the beatniks, hippies, gays and other such eclectic groups of the past) where people live and crap on the streets (because they cannot afford housing and social services for them have diminished)....and ask yourself this: which San Francisco was a better place: the San Francisco of the second half of the 20th century or the San Francisco of today?
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Old 06-01-2019, 06:47 AM
 
1,404 posts, read 351,344 times
Reputation: 1101
Quote:
Originally Posted by edsg25 View Post
It is not a New York issue that there is no "we're in this together" attitude. New York is (I believe) still part of the United States and there is no "we're in this together" attitude in this nation. Anywhere. Period.

The US has been characterized as a nation where one third of the population would like to kill another third while the last third stands by and watches and does nothing. I think that sums things up perfectly.

European nations with a relatively high degree of homogeneity, where the long lasting bonds of people and place operate in a different sphere from Americans. And nations where the economic range from wealthiest to poorest is the most minuscule have the greatest sense of peoplehood and oneness (i.e. Scandinavian nations). And when you have the widest of swings of income inequality like in the US, the commons become uncommons. The wealthier we get, the more the infrastructure goes to hell.

If New York was ever a "city of its own", a city of its people, a city with a true sense of place (and I believe to a degree it was), it is no longer. New York belongs to the globe it purportedly is capital of. New York, obviously Manhattan more than elsewhere, is merely a platform at the peak of the global network. New York is not a place to live, New York is a place to transfer into and transfer out. You don't live in New York; you plug into and out of New York.

It is perfectly logical that in a city where condos priced at $gazillion each into and beyond the clouds on a base with a footprint the size of shoe box tower and cast shadows over Central Park, arguably New York's greatest contribution to the commons, to we're all in it together as well as the soulless, cold dead, exclusive monolith of Hudson Yards leaves nearby Rockefeller Center, a relic of a more sense-of-place and equalitarian society reside in a city that can't spare a cent to bring its subway infrastructure up to 20th century standards (and, no, that wasn't a mistake....20th century would look good for the NYC subway system)

The irony of it all is that the more successful a city is, the more wealth it accumulates within its city limits, the more desirable it becomes.........all that.....they worse that city is. Success in today's market driven sense is the death knoll of any city. The more successful, the least desirable in so many ways.

It might be harder to see that if you can't see the forested megatalls of Manhattan from the brownstones trees of the neighborhoods, so its easier to get a perspective by looking elsewhere.

Like, San Francisco........remember that quirky, non-conformist, tolerant sense-of-place, sense-of-scale city of decades ago? Then look at the corporate, unaffordable, playground for the reach, techie dominated (somehow they seem to fit with the beatniks, hippies, gays and other such eclectic groups of the past) where people live and crap on the streets (because they cannot afford housing and social services for them have diminished)....and ask yourself this: which San Francisco was a better place: the San Francisco of the second half of the 20th century or the San Francisco of today?
Homogeneity > multiculturalism
Look no further than places like japan and the Nordic nations ( before the invasion of Muslims and Africans)
Everyone strives for the same goals, the greater good.
No one needs to skirt around issues surrounding race. No conflict or clashes between cultures (Muslims against Christians, race x vs race y), and misunderstanding due to language (I feel like less than 50% of NYC speaks Native, American English).
There’s no stigma of an underclass.
The nation behaves like a well oiled machine.
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