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Old 05-05-2020, 06:28 AM
 
4,757 posts, read 3,362,533 times
Reputation: 3715

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Airborneguy View Post
I couldn't imagine living without a car of my own. I don't care if I lived on 5th Avenue in Midtown. What do these people do when they want to travel anywhere outside of NYC and/or out of mass transit range? As a matter of fact, I can't even fathom having to share a car with my wife.

Totally agree. If I can't have guaranteed parking, then I can't live there. I have thought about giving up having a car when I move to NY but I just can't imagine it. But then again to all the people who grew up in NYC, I can understand them not wanting/needing a car. For me, having to rely on Atlanta transit was a total nightmare, and I haven't looked back ever since getting a car.
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Old 05-05-2020, 06:31 AM
 
4,757 posts, read 3,362,533 times
Reputation: 3715
Quote:
Originally Posted by MidwoodGoon View Post
On the bright side at least NYC will become more diverse. Immigrants will still come to the city and the Hispanic and Black population will not have to be pushed out. . So its a win win depending on who are.

I was thinking this. A lot of NYers who haven't been able to afford property might all of a sudden find themselves in a good position. Same for those struggling to pay rent. I would think that during this time people will likely consider buying versus renting. Then again with the jobs situation, not sure. If I had the money, I'd consider a place in Westchester...I still don't know if in a few years I'd be able to afford a place in any of the boroughs.
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Old 05-05-2020, 09:00 AM
 
Location: In a rural area
910 posts, read 752,632 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DreamerD View Post
I was thinking this. A lot of NYers who haven't been able to afford property might all of a sudden find themselves in a good position. Same for those struggling to pay rent. I would think that during this time people will likely consider buying versus renting. Then again with the jobs situation, not sure. If I had the money, I'd consider a place in Westchester...I still don't know if in a few years I'd be able to afford a place in any of the boroughs.
Um, no. Wishful thinking, at best. What makes anybody think that poor New Yorkers will be in a "better" position? Has anyone looked at the unemployment figures? If they cannot afford it now WITH a job, how will they afford it without a job? Not gonna happen. Diverse? It's already very diverse.

NYC will become cheaper for sure, but not SOOOO cheap that all of a sudden a cashier at Mcdonalds or some other low wage job is suddenly going to qualify for a mortgage, let alone a down payment (which requires saving a good amount of money and the ability to save). Renting MIGHT become more accessible though, but buying property? Oh and if you look at suburban areas in NJ or other parts of NY state, then there would be property taxes which are also through the roof.

I don't see how anybody who is really poor (and working, unless they are on some kind of benefits) would want to live here. NYC is a miserable place if you are poor. Being poor is no fun anywhere, but NYC has nothing motivating in it especially now. Will this change in the future? Only time will tell, but for now, no.
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Old 05-05-2020, 09:11 AM
 
Location: New Jersey and hating it
12,200 posts, read 7,215,987 times
Reputation: 17473
^ Agreed. Keep in mind though that NYC is very generous with bennies and that alone is what keeps many poor here. Sadly, that is also the demographic that will keep on voting in the Leftist Democrats to keep their bennies flowing. That of course cost money to sustain and the city has to tax the shrinking middle class and wealthy to keep the revenue. Of course these groups (along with their businesses and companies) will not stay just to be taxed to death so things will only get worse. We will be heading towards a Detroit-ifcation of NYC.

NYC is basically living on its name and cachet. Many companies still like to have their home office say “New York, NY.” Of course that won’t last forever as NYC has lost many F500 headquarters alone in the last half century than many large cities ever had combined!

Last edited by antinimby; 05-05-2020 at 09:19 AM..
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Old 05-05-2020, 09:28 AM
 
7,934 posts, read 8,587,137 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MidwoodGoon View Post
You can say that for every major city in America that has bars and clubs. Its 2020, just about every major city is "overpriced" at this point.
To an extent, but most of them aren't the tourist traps that NY is though. It rely's very heavily on hospitality, entertainment, and tourism revenue. At least the modern version we are all familiar with does. What you'd left with is NYC circa the 1970's and 80's, which don't get me wrong, I wish I could have experienced in the mid-late 80's instead of the Disney-fied and less-accessible version of it the 2010's, but if the economy goes into an extended slump or worse that place has further to fall than typical big cities.
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Old 05-05-2020, 12:58 PM
 
Location: In a rural area
910 posts, read 752,632 times
Reputation: 1432
Quote:
Originally Posted by antinimby View Post
^ Agreed. Keep in mind though that NYC is very generous with bennies and that alone is what keeps many poor here. Sadly, that is also the demographic that will keep on voting in the Leftist Democrats to keep their bennies flowing. That of course cost money to sustain and the city has to tax the shrinking middle class and wealthy to keep the revenue. Of course these groups (along with their businesses and companies) will not stay just to be taxed to death so things will only get worse. We will be heading towards a Detroit-ifcation of NYC.

NYC is basically living on its name and cachet. Many companies still like to have their home office say “New York, NY.” Of course that won’t last forever as NYC has lost many F500 headquarters alone in the last half century than many large cities ever had combined!
Yes, that is true. Every time I looked at my pay stub deductions and saw the "NYC tax" among others, I have always felt indignation to be honest. There are a lot of people in this city who are able bodied and since it is more profitable for them to work off the books and get benefits, that's what many people do.

I agree also that NYC basically is living off the name, nothing much else is really happening here in innovation or truly motivating and productive forces. Long ago, the more creative types left and what you have is basically a city with a huge percentage of angry "have nots" coupled with an aloof millionaire foreign class. Anything else in between is really struggling here and many have now either decided to leave (like myself) or are negotiating rent right now with their landlords.
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Old 05-05-2020, 03:29 PM
 
15,822 posts, read 14,463,105 times
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Except that this is crushing the city and state budgets. They're going to have a lot less money to hand out.

As far as corporate HQs, NYC is the top in the country, with more than twice as many as #2 (Chicago.)

Quote:
Originally Posted by antinimby View Post
^ Agreed. Keep in mind though that NYC is very generous with bennies and that alone is what keeps many poor here. Sadly, that is also the demographic that will keep on voting in the Leftist Democrats to keep their bennies flowing. That of course cost money to sustain and the city has to tax the shrinking middle class and wealthy to keep the revenue. Of course these groups (along with their businesses and companies) will not stay just to be taxed to death so things will only get worse. We will be heading towards a Detroit-ifcation of NYC.

NYC is basically living on its name and cachet. Many companies still like to have their home office say “New York, NY.” Of course that won’t last forever as NYC has lost many F500 headquarters alone in the last half century than many large cities ever had combined!
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Old 05-05-2020, 06:26 PM
 
Location: Seattle
606 posts, read 419,070 times
Reputation: 786
NYC isn't going to be a good place for anyone--rich or poor--remaining there. Most likely anyone who can afford to leave will leave. Anyone that's is left is not likely going to be able to afford to buy even with reduced prices. You also have to take into consideration the crime rates especially after bail reform. People who rely on subways that are stuck in nyc won't be happy to be there as the MTA continues crumbling.

I really think once the major companies relocate they'll take the masses with them. Suburbs are going to be more appealing for a myriad of reasons.
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Old 05-05-2020, 07:52 PM
 
Location: On a Long Island in NY
7,800 posts, read 10,102,524 times
Reputation: 7366
Quote:
Originally Posted by Montezia View Post
NYC isn't going to be a good place for anyone--rich or poor--remaining there. Most likely anyone who can afford to leave will leave. Anyone that's is left is not likely going to be able to afford to buy even with reduced prices. You also have to take into consideration the crime rates especially after bail reform. People who rely on subways that are stuck in nyc won't be happy to be there as the MTA continues crumbling.

I really think once the major companies relocate they'll take the masses with them. Suburbs are going to be more appealing for a myriad of reasons.
The LIA has seen a spike in requests for proposals from NYC companies looking to relocate to Long Island over the past few months, I imagine it's been the same for Westchester and northern New Jersey. It seems like everyday I read in Newsday about a company that "moved from Queens to Farmingdale" or "moving a portion of their office staff from Manhattan to Uniondale". A good friend of mine works for a large insurance company that has moved almost all of it's New York City staff to Long Island over the past few years. The NYC office is basically just the regional head honchos, human resources, and a few people who for whatever reason didn't want to transfer to the island.

De Blasio (and to a lesser extent Cuomo) need to wake the eff up. The AOC types are seriously hurting the business climate here.
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Old 05-05-2020, 11:34 PM
 
3,743 posts, read 1,440,675 times
Reputation: 1895
Quote:
Originally Posted by WIHS2006 View Post
The LIA has seen a spike in requests for proposals from NYC companies looking to relocate to Long Island over the past few months, I imagine it's been the same for Westchester and northern New Jersey. It seems like everyday I read in Newsday about a company that "moved from Queens to Farmingdale" or "moving a portion of their office staff from Manhattan to Uniondale". A good friend of mine works for a large insurance company that has moved almost all of it's New York City staff to Long Island over the past few years. The NYC office is basically just the regional head honchos, human resources, and a few people who for whatever reason didn't want to transfer to the island.

De Blasio (and to a lesser extent Cuomo) need to wake the eff up. The AOC types are seriously hurting the business climate here.
I predicted such scenario. My thing is this. For the Millennial generation. Covid-19 outbreak is a nail in the coffin for NYC and Millennials. Employers will have not to push jobs in suburban office parks just tp keep thier talented millennial work force. With Covid-19 I see real estate in NYC declining. What NYC needs to do is now reimagine itself for Gen Z in the next few years ahead as Gen Z population begins to transition from college to work force life.
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