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Old 01-27-2009, 07:53 PM
 
12,344 posts, read 24,966,177 times
Reputation: 10326

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This is a tiny, tiny suggestion but I'll go for it. People entering a large apartment building (where they live) should stop getting all pissed off when the person opening the front door with a key asks them whether they live there or who they are visiting before allowing them to come in behind them.

My elderly neighbors made me promise to ask anyone trying to enter the bldg behind me these types of questions "do you live here?" etc. I sometimes do this, but I get such attitude that sometimes I just can't face doing it. I've gotten the "you're just asking me because I'm black" attitude, and the "Can't you see I'm the cable guy" answer and various dirty looks.

People don't seem to understand that we are supposed to have this system for everyone's benefit.
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Old 01-27-2009, 08:07 PM
 
Location: Beautiful Pelham Parkway,The Bronx
9,165 posts, read 23,028,382 times
Reputation: 7548
You are absolutely right,Henna.When I was looking for an apartment,I saw some buildings where people seemed to let anyone in or buzz anyone in . I eliminated those buildings immediately.In the building I finally bought in,they are still asking what apartment i live in. I am happy that they do.There are 140 apts in the building so I guess it will take awhile.
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Old 01-27-2009, 08:08 PM
 
Location: Westbury,NY
2,940 posts, read 7,990,324 times
Reputation: 1398
Quote:
Originally Posted by Stac2007 View Post
I am not advocating vigilantism but often rapist and robbers will kill their victims as a means of not getting caught. Whose life is more important, the victim or the criminal?

The victim. If someone invades a property or tries to rob someone they deserve any deadly force they get.
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Old 01-27-2009, 08:14 PM
 
294 posts, read 813,223 times
Reputation: 85
Quote:
Originally Posted by Fred314X View Post
This is going to sound ridiculous, but, hey, I'm going to say it anyway...

If more people acted like responsible citizens, there would be less crime. I'm not entirely sure that it's an issue of economic situation. I think it has more to do with plain, old fashioned behavior.

And I'm one of those people who holds to the slightly radical notion that crime deserves punishment--not loophole-seeking lawyers who find technicalities to help criminals avoid punishment. Put 'em away for a while and let 'em think about what they've done. If you knew for an absolute certainty that, say, mugging someone was going to land you in prison for five or six years (no parole, thank you very much) tell me the truth: would you still commit the crime?

Alternatively (he said, tongue partially in cheek), we could take our cue from Stac2007 and bring vigilante justice into play. Imagine the market this will create in a city the size of New York for a new line of T-shirts: "I SHOT THREE CRIMINALS TODAY."

Fred...don't be scared to express your opinion. I feel the exact way you feel. Prison is to a certain extent a restort for criminals. You don't insert fear in their hearts when allow them to have a weight room, basketball courts, baseball feilds, board games, etc. You're suppose to make prison a very very bad place that you never want to come back too.
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Old 01-27-2009, 08:24 PM
 
Location: Medina (Brooklyn), NY
656 posts, read 1,580,541 times
Reputation: 211
Quote:
Originally Posted by 009 View Post
Keep it locked and stored in a safe place when not carrying it like most folks do who legally own one. What else?
True, I'm just saying you never know. Kids have a way of finding things.
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Old 01-27-2009, 08:42 PM
 
Location: Washington, DC & New York
10,918 posts, read 29,954,344 times
Reputation: 7129
Community policing, increased neighborhood watch groups, citizens auxiliary, and better after school programs are where I would begin the focus to make the city's crime rate drop. Community policing is a no-brainer as officers walking a beat are more likely to interact with the neighborhood, its businesses, and residents. They will be the first to know of a change in the neighborhood and bridge trust gaps to solve crimes that are committed.

Neighborhood watch is very important to work with the police, identifying groups that might be engaging in questionable behavior. They can also be a crime deterrent, as there is power in knowing that people are looking out for their neighbors and property in a given area. Such volunteers are trained by the police, so they know how to contact them should the need arise, and can have interactions with the community poicing efforts through their local patrol team and through the resource officer assigned to such groups.

A citizens auxiliary can augment a police force in a good way, aiding in things such as traffic direction, managing the desk at a precinct for the public (not for the criminals), interacting with the neighborhood watch groups, providing education to school and community groups, etc. This can free augment a police force to actually to more with less, not just give lip service to that claim.

Better after school programs allow students to go somewhere, off the streets. Perhaps coordinated efforts with senior volunteers can allow for chess, homework help, sports, etc. There are many seniors who would love something to do, and many students who need something to do when the parents are at work. With a coordinated, well-managed volunteer effort, able seniors would be interacting with students and teens, reducing barriers between the groups, and giving each a purpose. Knowing the senior citizens in a neighborhood in a positive manner would help to foster a sense of community, such that you would have students looking out for seniors and vice versa. True, not all would be taking part in such programs, but a good number might do so, and that can curb potential crime before it begins, and give students somewhere to go and a means through which they could learn from seniors and vice versa. Computer classes could be used to give those not familiar with the Internet a junior tutor to show them the basics of email and the Internet, for example. The big thing would be how to pay for this, but there's a way that it could work, corporate and community group sponsorships in a public-private venture.

Those are things that spring to mind when I think about how to go about creating a culture where crime is lessened, through pro-active means, not arresting everyone on the street and getting charges to stick on some.
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Old 01-27-2009, 08:52 PM
 
Location: Medina (Brooklyn), NY
656 posts, read 1,580,541 times
Reputation: 211
Quote:
Originally Posted by Henna View Post
This is a tiny, tiny suggestion but I'll go for it. People entering a large apartment building (where they live) should stop getting all pissed off when the person opening the front door with a key asks them whether they live there or who they are visiting before allowing them to come in behind them.

My elderly neighbors made me promise to ask anyone trying to enter the bldg behind me these types of questions "do you live here?" etc. I sometimes do this, but I get such attitude that sometimes I just can't face doing it. I've gotten the "you're just asking me because I'm black" attitude, and the "Can't you see I'm the cable guy" answer and various dirty looks.

People don't seem to understand that we are supposed to have this system for everyone's benefit.
Well being as I don't know you personally I can't say much. Do you find that you ask only the black people entering your building or anyone of any race? (I'm not saying that is what you do) I'm seriously asking because that is very much apart of the issue. Or maybe you do it without knowing you do *shrugs shoulders*. I've made similar comments before when entering a store and am being blatantly followed around because I'm black or (my favorite) when white women stop and pretend like they're tying their shoe or walk in a circle around a car so I can go past them because they think I'm going to rob them (since I'm black).

On the other hand, maybe you ask anybody who comes in the building but it so happens that particular black person has had those experiences in the past that I mention and just assumed you were asking them because of their skin color *shrugs shoulders*. Being as I don't know you it's a tough answer but it is for everyones benefit, if your not singling people out.

Quote:
Originally Posted by A_Better_Bronx_2morrow[/quote
Fred...don't be scared to express your opinion. I feel the exact way you feel. Prison is to a certain extent a restort for criminals. You don't insert fear in their hearts when allow them to have a weight room, basketball courts, baseball feilds, board games, etc. You're suppose to make prison a very very bad place that you never want to come back too.
I strongly disagree. I won't call your views far right extreme conservative (as you attacked me in the previous thread), but I will intelligently debate you based on logic.

Have you seen some jails across the country (not as an inmate of course)? We have some rough prisons here. Beside the fact that you can easily get killed inside, as the news recently brought to light you can get killed because correction officers hire inmates to run the jails and ignore your cries for help when your getting beat to death or sexually assaulted at night. The problem is not that jails are "soft", we need to put more emphasis on reform. Simply, there are not enough programs in place to help inmates build better lives for themselves while in jail so that when they come out they will have have more options (as options is the primary reason most are in there to begin with). But of course the government makes too much money off keeping people (predominantly minorities) locked up that the REAL issues aren't dealth with.
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Old 01-27-2009, 09:08 PM
 
12,344 posts, read 24,966,177 times
Reputation: 10326
Quote:
Originally Posted by justfarr1030 View Post
Well being as I don't know you personally I can't say much. Do you find that you ask only the black people entering your building or anyone of any race? (I'm not saying that is what you do) I'm seriously asking because that is very much apart of the issue. Or maybe you do it without knowing you do *shrugs shoulders*. I've made similar comments before when entering a store and am being blatantly followed around because I'm black or (my favorite) when white women stop and pretend like they're tying their shoe or walk in a circle around a car so I can go past them because they think I'm going to rob them (since I'm black).

No, when I was in the habit of asking people, I would ask anyone I didn't recognize, whatever color they were (and we have ALL colors here, in the most diverse borough of NYC ). Now I often can't muster the courage to confront the people I don't recognize because of the hassle that invariably ensues.

To some degree I understand if you're black and you've encountered racism many times that you would be annoyed if a white person didn't want to let you into your own building and not only that, but has the nerve to ask you if you live there, especially when you've been living there much longer than she has.

But I would think that no matter how much of a racial weight you're bearing on your shoulders that you could also think for a second: I don't recognize her either, so it makes sense that she doesn't recognize me; and also thank the person for keeping the bldg safe. Btw, I live in a coop with mostly owners, so everyone should be interested in keeping their their home safe.
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Old 01-27-2009, 09:18 PM
 
Location: Medina (Brooklyn), NY
656 posts, read 1,580,541 times
Reputation: 211
Quote:
Originally Posted by bmwguydc View Post
Community policing, increased neighborhood watch groups, citizens auxiliary, and better after school programs are where I would begin the focus to make the city's crime rate drop. Community policing is a no-brainer as officers walking a beat are more likely to interact with the neighborhood, its businesses, and residents. They will be the first to know of a change in the neighborhood and bridge trust gaps to solve crimes that are committed.

Neighborhood watch is very important to work with the police, identifying groups that might be engaging in questionable behavior. They can also be a crime deterrent, as there is power in knowing that people are looking out for their neighbors and property in a given area. Such volunteers are trained by the police, so they know how to contact them should the need arise, and can have interactions with the community poicing efforts through their local patrol team and through the resource officer assigned to such groups.

A citizens auxiliary can augment a police force in a good way, aiding in things such as traffic direction, managing the desk at a precinct for the public (not for the criminals), interacting with the neighborhood watch groups, providing education to school and community groups, etc. This can free augment a police force to actually to more with less, not just give lip service to that claim.

Better after school programs allow students to go somewhere, off the streets. Perhaps coordinated efforts with senior volunteers can allow for chess, homework help, sports, etc. There are many seniors who would love something to do, and many students who need something to do when the parents are at work. With a coordinated, well-managed volunteer effort, able seniors would be interacting with students and teens, reducing barriers between the groups, and giving each a purpose. Knowing the senior citizens in a neighborhood in a positive manner would help to foster a sense of community, such that you would have students looking out for seniors and vice versa. True, not all would be taking part in such programs, but a good number might do so, and that can curb potential crime before it begins, and give students somewhere to go and a means through which they could learn from seniors and vice versa. Computer classes could be used to give those not familiar with the Internet a junior tutor to show them the basics of email and the Internet, for example. The big thing would be how to pay for this, but there's a way that it could work, corporate and community group sponsorships in a public-private venture.

Those are things that spring to mind when I think about how to go about creating a culture where crime is lessened, through pro-active means, not arresting everyone on the street and getting charges to stick on some.
I like where your going with it. But I feel that it is completely centered around a socio-economic issue that after tiresome effort we have already tried many of the tactics that you mention. I think it is time to try something different.
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Old 01-27-2009, 09:31 PM
 
Location: Medina (Brooklyn), NY
656 posts, read 1,580,541 times
Reputation: 211
Quote:
Originally Posted by Henna View Post
No, when I was in the habit of asking people, I would ask anyone I didn't recognize, whatever color they were (and we have ALL colors here, in the most diverse borough of NYC ).
W/e. I admitted I was wrong.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Henna
Now I often can't muster the courage to confront the people I don't recognize because of the hassle that invariably ensues.

To some degree I understand if you're black and you've encountered racism many times that you would be annoyed if a white person didn't want to let you into your own building and not only that, but has the nerve to ask you if you live there, especially when you've been living there much longer than she has.

But I would think that no matter how much of a racial weight you're bearing on your shoulders that you could also think for a second: I don't recognize her either, so it makes sense that she doesn't recognize me; and also thank the person for keeping the bldg safe. Btw, I live in a coop with mostly owners, so everyone should be interested in keeping their their home safe.
Can I offer some advice for what it is worth? I say keep on doing it. It's great that you care about your community that much as alot of people don't go the extra yard (something the NY Giants couldn't do either ).

Try explaining to them when you ask "Excuse me sir or maam, how are you doing today? *response* I'm fine. So are you new in this building? *response* Oh because I've never saw you. My name is *Henna*, and I live on the (?) floor. I usually try to ask when I see new faces because I want to look out for the safety of ALL residents in the building (etc).

I'm not saying everyone will like it even after a different approach, but I believe most will and you will just be known as the "lady who always ask if you live here" and people will get used to it. Let me know what happens.
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