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Old 05-31-2014, 12:05 PM
 
Location: Planet Earth
3,921 posts, read 9,124,889 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Slendabrn38 View Post
Wow. That many black kids go to that school?
For what it's worth, I've heard from a few people who've attended or had relatives who attended that a good portion of them don't live in the immediate area (actually, the people who told me didn't live in the area either). A lot of them live in areas further up like Flatbush and Bed-Stuy.
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Old 05-31-2014, 03:05 PM
 
Location: Brooklyn, NY
1,271 posts, read 3,230,808 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by checkmatechamp13 View Post
For what it's worth, I've heard from a few people who've attended or had relatives who attended that a good portion of them don't live in the immediate area (actually, the people who told me didn't live in the area either). A lot of them live in areas further up like Flatbush and Bed-Stuy.
The post was really old, but yes, the school district boundaries include all of Flatlands and large portions of Flatbush and East Flatbush as well as Marine Park, Mill Basin, Bergen Beach, Gerritsen Beach and Sheepshead Bay. I assume most of the students come from the former neighborhoods. Shouldn't be many if any students from Bed-Stuy, though, as they'd be far out of district.
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Old 05-31-2014, 06:42 PM
 
Location: Glendale NY
4,840 posts, read 9,910,603 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by checkmatechamp13 View Post
For what it's worth, I've heard from a few people who've attended or had relatives who attended that a good portion of them don't live in the immediate area (actually, the people who told me didn't live in the area either). A lot of them live in areas further up like Flatbush and Bed-Stuy.
I think most kids that are from Sheepshead Bay proper tend to go to High Schools in Midwood, such as Madison or Murrow.
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Old 01-24-2015, 09:16 PM
 
Location: brooklyn, new york, USA
898 posts, read 1,217,994 times
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i was a student in sheepshead bay high school (for night school) back in 1993. it was 90% or so black at that point. it is across the street from projects that blacks live in. this is not the heart of sheepshead bay. let's tell the topic guy the real story (yes i know he is gone from 6 years ago but others like him will read this). as most have said, you should not see racist stuff here if you mind your own business. if you linger, then probably yeah cause you stick out as would anyone from an outside race. avoid bensonhurst (the racism is still present against blacks) if you are black. you can also try midwood. in my building, a few blacks live here i believe and one acted inappropriately (going into the elevator without a tshirt). no problems here with racism against them but you shouldn't do things like that when you know you are under a microscope.

doomdan: no kid (white black or asian or any other race) from a good family would ever think about going to sheepshead bay high school. it's a dangerous school and right outside stand many project buildings where drug deals go on and gangs linger. most go to the 3 m's. midwood murrow and madison. i went to murrow btw.

Last edited by Hairy Guy; 01-24-2015 at 09:55 PM..
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Old 01-31-2015, 05:00 AM
 
5 posts, read 15,947 times
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As the poster immediately before me state, clearly the OP has already moved, whether to Sheepshead Bay or another neighborhood. But in the interests of others who might be thinking about moving to this area of Brooklyn, or the surrounding neighborhood, I gree up not far from Sheepshead Bay, went there often as a kid of the 1960s and 70s, and lived across the street from the high school.

The entire neighborhood was once an enclave of mostly Italian-Americas, like Bensonhurst was. (I also lived at the eastern edge of Bensonhurst from 1984-90, on 62nd Street and 23rd Avenue, about two blocks from the F train station on MacDonald Avenue.)

First of all, what's left of the old Italian families in Sheepshead Bay is literally aging out. The area is becoming more and more Russian (which I'll use as an inclusive name for the immigrants of all the countries formerly under the control of the Soviet Union.) My own grandmother was from what had been a small village near Kiev, but she and her extended family came to the US in 1923 when she was just 17. She was the most loving and least prejudiced person I've ever known, and she more than anyone taught me to be colorblind about people. However, in the years before she died, in early 1983 when the first influxes of modern Russians were arriving in New York, she was extremely annoyed by what she considered their rudeness and very insular attitudes. She and her family lost everything when they fled the newly formed Soviet Union, and as the eldest of 3 she had to start working full-time. Yet she managed to go to night school, obtain her high school diploma, earn her citizenship, and learn to speak fluent English, even though she retained a heavy accent her entire life. What annoyed her most were people from anywhere who refused to learn to speak English, and she felt that those from her own homeland to be the worst of all. Besides that, there was the issue of their behavior in general, while shopping, walking on the streets, and on public transportation. These things I've experienced for myself. Increasingly, more and more stores of all kinds are opening under Russian ownership, management and staff in Sheepshead Bay. Not only don't many of the workers speak English, the labels are often printed in Cyrillic, so there's no one to translate. But worst of all was and is the lack of manners and the refusal to learn recent laws, and the concept that state or federal laws take precedence over local laws. For instance, when my service dog was alive, by the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 (since revised and updated) stated that I could bring him ANYWHERE with me as long as he was well-behaved, which he was. He also wore a bright red vest that said in large black letters on both sides: "SERVICE DOG"; which could hardly be missed since he ranged from 85-90 lbs. I also carried copies of the State Department's document entitled "Common Questions and Answers about the Rights of People with Service Dogs"; a multi-page document that was later condensed to a single page. However, not only would these store owners or clerks refuse to read my documentation, they'd cause embarrassing scenes by yelling at me in front of the entire store. They'd also ask me what my disability is, which is a direct violation of my civil rights. (FYI: the question that IS legal to ask is "what does your dog assist you with", to which you can be as open or vague as you are comfortable with.) For the first few years that I lived there, I'd simply tell them to call the police while I continued to shop. I was certain no one would physically lay hands on me for fear of my large, wolf-like licking machine. After the police had been called several times, THEY became angry, asking why all staff had not been informed about the outcome of previous visits, in which my rights had been properly upheld. One of the excuses I heard most was, "I didn't see the words 'Service Dog'", which was a transparent lie. I they saw the 90 lb. dog, then they also saw the bright red vest, and from there they couldn't NOT see the large black words on both sides. Years later, after my dog had died, in that Russian-owned and staffed store as well as others, while I was being "assisted" by clerks who spoke little English to my non-existent Russian, if a Russian-speaking customer interrupted, I was dropped, despite having waited on line for 15 minutes or more. So I don't think it's necessarily a race issue, or a gender one, but one of national origin and language.

Living directly across the street from Sheepshead Bay High School, and speaking to the large number of NYPD officers there on any school day, I was told that it is an extremely dangerous school, especially with regard to gangs. As far as these gangs originating from the public housing across Avenue X, I would tend to doubt that. Not only were there many school and MTA buses dedicated to students only, but from the bodega on the corner, owned by Arabs and staffed by the same as well as a few Hispanic men from the projects, it was obviously a hang out for some of the AA and Hispanic men ranging from late teens to middle-aged men, and I never felt at all uncomfortable or unsafe when I had to go there, for an emergency quart of milk or something like it. Still, I wouldn't be happy about sending my child to school at SBHS.

The next few problems in the area are rather serious. Despite the number of schools between Nostrand Avenue between Avenues X and Y back to the High School, the intersections are EXTREMELY dangerous. The corner of Avenue Y and Coyle has a stop sign which most drivers ignore, and Coyle Street itself is often used by drivers or motorcyclists to gun their engines and speed down. I had obtained my apartment by the recommendation of a neighbor who, as an old friend of my mother's, I'd known all my life. When I asked her and her husband about the disregarded stop sign on the corner, I was told that for decades, whenever the issue was raised at community board meetings, the answer remained the same: until there were at least 5 fatalities, no traffic light would be installed. That along with the often noxious stench emanating from the nearby wastewater treatment facility, was especially illegal because of the proximity and danger to the chidren in the schools and sports fields, and the high number of elderly, considered "sensitive receptors" under environmental legislation at all levels. (I spent nearly ten years working for an environmental consulting firm, and the president, my direct boss, was one of the highest regarded international experts in the field of Stationary Air Quality.)

Sheepshead Bay, as with other Brooklyn neighborhoods just north of the Belt Parkway, is very isolated for someone without a car, yet with one parking is difficult to find during the week. There is an Express Bus to Manhattan, but they keep increasing fares while cutting back on stops and buses and often don't have updated copies of the current schedule. The other alternative is taking a bus to the train. As an example, due to to my disability I needed help taking care of chores, like shopping, laundry, cleaning, and pack, especially at the end when I was being forced to move in very little time because of lies my elderly landlady told me, and a two family dwelling has no protections under NYS law. My former employer offered to send her housekeeper to help me and pay her, as always very generous to me. But the housekeeper, a young, healthy woman who would be getting paid for this work, declined because it was too difficult to reach me without a car. I've always thought that was rather ironic, considering I was expected to travel to Manhattan and Brooklyn Heights (where I used to live and work, and where many of my doctors still practiced). The healthy woman couldn't do it, but the disabled one was expected to.

My last point s in respect to what a previous poster stated about Bensonhurst also being mostly Italian. Because that was where my first apartment was, and I knew and liked the neighborhood, hoping that some of the neighbors I'd known would still be there, I was shocked to find it has almost entirely become mostly Russian and Asian. I even rang the bell of the house where I used to live, and a very suspicious and somewhat hostile Russian man answered, gave me the absolute minimum of information, and I believe did this only because I smiled charmingly and greeted him with the few Russian words my grandmother taught me. But even had my old apartment been for rent, I truly doubt that he wold have considered me.

As I stated in the beginning, the OP's quest is likely no longer an issue. But for any other African-American person or family is looking to live in that area of Brooklyn, the part where I grew up, and which has transitioned from mostly Irish and Italian with a few Jewish families to mostly African-American is where I would recommend. I haven't been there since around 2005, when I took my dog for a walk around while my mother was seeing her podiatrist. I happened to meet the AA family my mother sold our house to, and the renovations they had made were beautiful. I wish it had been that way when we lived there, rather than one small bathroom for 4 females and I male. I'm not sure about the public school situation now, but the district grammar school is P.S. 11, a short walk away, and the junior high school is Andries Hudde IS 20 on Nostrand Avenue between Avenues K & L. I had some of the finest public school teachers ever in those schools.
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Old 01-31-2015, 09:46 AM
 
769 posts, read 1,014,030 times
Reputation: 1360
Quote:
Originally Posted by Warszawa View Post
I've heard a bunch of fat white kids (natives probably, they didn't sound Russian) throw around the n-word like they were rappers, over by Avenue Z

in my experience, all races of teenagers and twentysomethings in NYC seem to use that word when they are conversating with each other.

i don't think it holds the connotation that you think it does anymore. i hear spanish, pakistani, russian, itialian, jewish and even bengali males using that word on a daily basis.

yes, it is annoying that these kids don't have enough education to know how to communicate with one another, but my ***** is just a localized NY slang used by all races.
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Old 01-31-2015, 10:58 AM
 
Location: Wisconsin
260 posts, read 433,447 times
Reputation: 177
Quote:
Originally Posted by Need2LeaveNYC View Post
The entire neighborhood was once an enclave of mostly Italian-Americas, like Bensonhurst was. (I also lived at the eastern edge of Bensonhurst from 1984-90, on 62nd Street and 23rd Avenue, about two blocks from the F train station on MacDonald Avenue.)

First of all, what's left of the old Italian families in Sheepshead Bay is literally aging out. The area is becoming more and more Russian (which I'll use as an inclusive name for the immigrants of all the countries formerly under the control of the Soviet Union.) My own grandmother was from what had been a small village near Kiev, but she and her extended family came to the US in 1923 when she was just 17. She was the most loving and least prejudiced person I've ever known, and she more than anyone taught me to be colorblind about people. However, in the years before she died, in early 1983 when the first influxes of modern Russians were arriving in New York, she was extremely annoyed by what she considered their rudeness and very insular attitudes. She and her family lost everything when they fled the newly formed Soviet Union, and as the eldest of 3 she had to start working full-time. Yet she managed to go to night school, obtain her high school diploma, earn her citizenship, and learn to speak fluent English, even though she retained a heavy accent her entire life. What annoyed her most were people from anywhere who refused to learn to speak English, and she felt that those from her own homeland to be the worst of all. Besides that, there was the issue of their behavior in general, while shopping, walking on the streets, and on public transportation. These things I've experienced for myself. Increasingly, more and more stores of all kinds are opening under Russian ownership, management and staff in Sheepshead Bay. Not only don't many of the workers speak English, the labels are often printed in Cyrillic, so there's no one to translate. But worst of all was and is the lack of manners and the refusal to learn recent laws, and the concept that state or federal laws take precedence over local laws. For instance, when my service dog was alive, by the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 (since revised and updated) stated that I could bring him ANYWHERE with me as long as he was well-behaved, which he was. He also wore a bright red vest that said in large black letters on both sides: "SERVICE DOG"; which could hardly be missed since he ranged from 85-90 lbs. I also carried copies of the State Department's document entitled "Common Questions and Answers about the Rights of People with Service Dogs"; a multi-page document that was later condensed to a single page. However, not only would these store owners or clerks refuse to read my documentation, they'd cause embarrassing scenes by yelling at me in front of the entire store. They'd also ask me what my disability is, which is a direct violation of my civil rights. (FYI: the question that IS legal to ask is "what does your dog assist you with", to which you can be as open or vague as you are comfortable with.) For the first few years that I lived there, I'd simply tell them to call the police while I continued to shop. I was certain no one would physically lay hands on me for fear of my large, wolf-like licking machine. After the police had been called several times, THEY became angry, asking why all staff had not been informed about the outcome of previous visits, in which my rights had been properly upheld. One of the excuses I heard most was, "I didn't see the words 'Service Dog'", which was a transparent lie. I they saw the 90 lb. dog, then they also saw the bright red vest, and from there they couldn't NOT see the large black words on both sides. Years later, after my dog had died, in that Russian-owned and staffed store as well as others, while I was being "assisted" by clerks who spoke little English to my non-existent Russian, if a Russian-speaking customer interrupted, I was dropped, despite having waited on line for 15 minutes or more. So I don't think it's necessarily a race issue, or a gender one, but one of national origin and language.
The big difference between early Russian waves and post-1970 Russian waves it that the latter was much older. I read somewhere that the average age of Russian Jews coming in was around 40+, making them the oldest population in Europe. It's important to note that it's very difficult to learn a new language past the age of 40, hence why cyrillic is commonly used. My father came to the country when he was quite young, in 1979, and while I speak fluent Russian, I rarely need to use it. I've found that many Russians can speak English, and I've never really had trouble with them. They can be rude, but hey, living under a Soviet regime for so long can do that. Most of the older ones that are rude have been here for decades, and they stick a bit too much to their language.

Also, many of the early Russian Jews were highly skilled. They were well-off in Russia comparably, and had to work in cab services and other lower-skilled positions. It's no surprise they aren't the happiest people.
Most of my doctors have Soviet background, and had to go back to medical school to practice their profession here in the states.

However, I've known older Italians that have been here for 30+ years that still converse in Italian, you can find some still hanging around in Gravesend and Bensonhurst. I've had Italian friends whose grandparents arrived in the 60s, and yet they still have very thick accents and prefer to speak Italian. Odd to single out Russians here.

Newer Russian-speaking immigrants seem to pick up English faster, or know some on arrival. I find that they are also less rude than the original immigrants that came before 2000, and a bit less conservative as well.

The Russian-speaking population is not rapidly growing in Southern Brooklyn. It's not the 90s anymore. The population of people born in Russia and Ukraine (in Brooklyn) actually fell between 2000 and today. Most of the Russian Jews came in the late 80s, early 90s, and they still make up the bulk of the population. Their children are leaving off to universities and the suburbs, leaving the older, original Russian-speakers around.

I am sorry that you have to go through those experiences though. Russians aren't always running the best businesses, and they also seem to be running a lot of insurance fraud schemes. Young American-born Russians, like myself, and those here since they were children aren't happy with how older Russians act either. I have Russian-American friends who hate working for or dealing with Russian-owned businesses.
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Old 02-28-2015, 02:11 PM
 
3,960 posts, read 3,594,814 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by blainnyc View Post
The big difference between early Russian waves and post-1970 Russian waves it that the latter was much older. I read somewhere that the average age of Russian Jews coming in was around 40+, making them the oldest population in Europe. It's important to note that it's very difficult to learn a new language past the age of 40, hence why cyrillic is commonly used. My father came to the country when he was quite young, in 1979, and while I speak fluent Russian, I rarely need to use it. I've found that many Russians can speak English, and I've never really had trouble with them. They can be rude, but hey, living under a Soviet regime for so long can do that. Most of the older ones that are rude have been here for decades, and they stick a bit too much to their language.

Also, many of the early Russian Jews were highly skilled. They were well-off in Russia comparably, and had to work in cab services and other lower-skilled positions. It's no surprise they aren't the happiest people.
Most of my doctors have Soviet background, and had to go back to medical school to practice their profession here in the states.

However, I've known older Italians that have been here for 30+ years that still converse in Italian, you can find some still hanging around in Gravesend and Bensonhurst. I've had Italian friends whose grandparents arrived in the 60s, and yet they still have very thick accents and prefer to speak Italian. Odd to single out Russians here.

Newer Russian-speaking immigrants seem to pick up English faster, or know some on arrival. I find that they are also less rude than the original immigrants that came before 2000, and a bit less conservative as well.

The Russian-speaking population is not rapidly growing in Southern Brooklyn. It's not the 90s anymore. The population of people born in Russia and Ukraine (in Brooklyn) actually fell between 2000 and today. Most of the Russian Jews came in the late 80s, early 90s, and they still make up the bulk of the population. Their children are leaving off to universities and the suburbs, leaving the older, original Russian-speakers around.

I am sorry that you have to go through those experiences though. Russians aren't always running the best businesses, and they also seem to be running a lot of insurance fraud schemes. Young American-born Russians, like myself, and those here since they were children aren't happy with how older Russians act either. I have Russian-American friends who hate working for or dealing with Russian-owned businesses.
That's nice to hear.

My sense is that the children of Russians/Russian Jews, who grew up here in New York, don't behave in some of the some of the ways the Russian born and raised older people do (rudeness, brusqueness, questionable business practices,etc.)

I went to a Russian trained doctor and dentist once. Never again. (sorry,but that's my take on it).
I also would never, ever recommend that anyone go to a Russian-trained psychiatrist (worked with too many of them).

Also, many of the middle aged and older Russian people I see here in NYC look and act as if they have PTSD. (maybe they do from growing up in the Soviet Union?)
They have a blunted look on their face. No expression at all.
Very odd and disconcerting.
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