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Old 05-11-2010, 06:00 PM
 
18 posts, read 89,591 times
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So I've lived in this apartment in the East Village for a year now. It's a Co Op, and I rent a 1 bedroom in the building. My 1 year lease is up on June 1st. I'm looking to renew.

I talked to the Vice Presdient of the board for the Co op (who more or less acts as the landlord since she lives in the building). I talked to her in the beginning of April about renewing. She said thats great, and she'd get the management company to send over the necessary papers.

Never heard anything. End of April, same situation. Saw her, asked her about renewal, she said management would send things over.

Saw her on May 8th, mentioned it again, said the same thing, and then she said "by the way, the rent will go up 5 - 10%". I said "oh really?". She said (again) she would have the management company send over details.

So here I am, almost mid-may, and I haven't heard anything. My lease is up in less than 20 days. I feel like I should have gotten some written notification if my rent was going to go up, and I should have gotten at least a month in advance so I could have time to decide if I wanted to move. Also the fact that I said multiple times I wanted to renew, and the rent increase was never mentioned, bothers me.

So, is there any law governing this? Does the landlord need to provide info about rent increase some time before lease renewal? Or at the end of the lease, they can simply do what they want?
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Old 05-11-2010, 06:09 PM
 
Location: Beautiful Pelham Parkway,The Bronx
8,830 posts, read 21,382,081 times
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Who are you actually renting from ? Does anyone actually own the apartment you are renting ?

I think it's strange that the vice president of the co op board is acting as a rental agent for the building.Most co ops either don't allow renting at all or only for 1 year under certain circumstances.

I don't think co op units fall under any kind of rent guidelines and I think they can charge whatever they want.
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Old 05-11-2010, 06:15 PM
 
362 posts, read 714,287 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jimihendrix55 View Post
So I've lived in this apartment in the East Village for a year now. It's a Co Op, and I rent a 1 bedroom in the building. My 1 year lease is up on June 1st. I'm looking to renew.

I talked to the Vice Presdient of the board for the Co op (who more or less acts as the landlord since she lives in the building). I talked to her in the beginning of April about renewing. She said thats great, and she'd get the management company to send over the necessary papers.

Never heard anything. End of April, same situation. Saw her, asked her about renewal, she said management would send things over.

Saw her on May 8th, mentioned it again, said the same thing, and then she said "by the way, the rent will go up 5 - 10%". I said "oh really?". She said (again) she would have the management company send over details.

So here I am, almost mid-may, and I haven't heard anything. My lease is up in less than 20 days. I feel like I should have gotten some written notification if my rent was going to go up, and I should have gotten at least a month in advance so I could have time to decide if I wanted to move. Also the fact that I said multiple times I wanted to renew, and the rent increase was never mentioned, bothers me.

So, is there any law governing this? Does the landlord need to provide info about rent increase some time before lease renewal? Or at the end of the lease, they can simply do what they want?

did they give you a written lease if so they should've stated that the rent might go up at the end of the lease. As for them taking forever to get back to you, that's either their way of ensuring you don't leave with a higher rent to pay(Landlords are the worst, never met one I didn't like except for maybe JUST ONE) or they're sloppy with following up. I'd say the Former is the real issue. in this economy, most landlords will rely on the tenants not having knowledge of their rights as tenants and in most cases exploit them in doing so. I"ve had a neighbor who's rent went up by like 200%, but she really had it coming as she lived alone in a two bedroom apartment that was "undervalued" everybody else's rent went up by like 5%.

I'd say move if you can do it, and they don't evict you and keep you on a month-to-month rental agreement, meaning you'll pay a bit more to stay while looking for another place.

standard procedure(atleast in CT) is to give you a lease renewal with the intent to raise the rent if they so choose to. For them to forget is just sloppy. I'm thinking they're really just trying to keep you there. Most landlords are greedy gluttons who will take all your money and come up with reasons so as to not give you your deposit back even if you the Apartment is just like when you first got there.

just my two cents, but I would really considering moving out. They're too sloppy to let that slip like that, and I bet it was just really on purpose, which might call for some legal action on your part for exploitation.
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Old 05-11-2010, 06:35 PM
 
979 posts, read 4,105,141 times
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With no lease in hand I would just send the same rent. I manage several coops and they are notorious for avoiding Landlord issues. If you want to be proactive offer a fair increase. they might not have the stomach for negotiation and agree. If you have the balls for it you could answer any 3 day notice for holdover (unlikely) by showing up in court and explaining the situation as you've stated here. Likely a judge will give you a couple of months at the same rent to find another place.
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Old 05-11-2010, 06:48 PM
 
18 posts, read 89,591 times
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There's a management company I pay rent to. However, it seems most people in the building own their apartments. it's an old building, most of the famalies have been here a very long time.

Out of about 50 apartment in the building, I'd say there's only 5 - 10 "new" people such as myself renting (new as in, within the last 5 years)

There's a Board of Directors for the co-op, which I believe oversees various decisions.

I was under the impression that most buildings in manhattan were co-ops...

Any by Cop-op, I mean that people own single apartments in the building, but that no one necessarily owns the entire building (such as landlord)
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Old 05-11-2010, 06:51 PM
 
646 posts, read 2,311,367 times
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Seems to be a case where management handles the renewals, have you called them directly?
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Old 05-11-2010, 06:55 PM
 
18 posts, read 89,591 times
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Originally Posted by pureistheword View Post
Seems to be a case where management handles the renewals, have you called them directly?
I have not actually. This was sort of the next question. Because there is no "landlord" im not entirely sure who the decisions for various things comes down to. I was originally under the impression that the Management company simply took care of collecting rent and such. And that the board of directors was responsible for the decisions.

But then again, I have no idea really.

The Vice president of the board (who lives downstairs) was the one who actually rented me the apartment. She showed it to me,a nd I signed everything with her. She says I can drop rent at her place if I need to, instead of mailing it to the management company (I assume she then passes it along to them).

She's nice. Just a woman with a family who's been here a long while. Might inquire to her regardless about keeping the rent where it is, with the economy and all
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Old 05-11-2010, 06:57 PM
 
979 posts, read 4,105,141 times
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Sounds like a condo. Much harder for a coop member to indiscriminately rent out their apartment. Usually requires approval from the other coop members. Condos are a mix of angry owner/occupiers and owners who simply rent out the units to make a profit. Either way, you are going up against a single person or entity, not a LANDLORD in the classical sense. The coop board or condo would not be involved with any litigation or negotiation regarding the rent for a single unit. This is good for you.
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Old 05-11-2010, 06:59 PM
 
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Yeah, thats what I've heard. For all I know, my 'application' went through the board of directors for approval when I originally got the place

Quote:
Originally Posted by modsquad81 View Post
Sounds like a condo. Much harder for a coop member to indiscriminately rent out their apartment. Usually requires approval from the other coop members. Condos are a mix of angry owner/occupiers and owners who simply rent out the units to make a profit.
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Old 05-11-2010, 07:09 PM
 
979 posts, read 4,105,141 times
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Quote:
Might inquire to her regardless about keeping the rent where it is, with the economy and all
The fact that she is on sight is to your advantage. Yes definitely give it a shot. A bird in hand as they say. I don't know why she has taken on responsibility for your apartment. It is definitely a disadvantage to be that close.
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