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Old 08-06-2007, 05:53 PM
 
131 posts, read 646,219 times
Reputation: 49

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Quote:
Originally Posted by honeychrome View Post
Everyone in the US complains about the way people in other states drive, that they drive like maniacs, etc., etc. With some exceptions, I think the driving habits of Americans are pretty uniform and the perception that drivers are bad in other states comes from lack of familiarity with the roads on the part of the visitor/new arrival. When you are a newcomer, you don't know your way around while most of those on the road with you you are locals and do- they're driving faster because they know the roads, know where they are going and want to get there fast. That said, compared to much of Europe, American drivers in general are pretty inattentive, ignorant of traffic laws and conventions and not particularly skilled at driving, however compared to the third world countries I've driven in Americans are pros!
Noted. Also, I consider myself a very attentive driver.
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Old 08-06-2007, 05:56 PM
 
131 posts, read 646,219 times
Reputation: 49
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rachael84 View Post
I don't think you can find more aggressive drivers than the NYC area. My counselor at SUNY Cortland (from Cortland), said that if you can drive on the LIE, you can drive anywhere in the world lol

There's a big difference between aggressive drivers and just plain bad drivers. I just came back from Florida; now THOSE are some bad drivers. People who don't put lights on when it's pouring rain, or not staying in their lane when they make a turn. Those are bad drivers, very different from aggressive.
I appreciate your reply, but I believe a VERY FINE LINE EXISTS BETWEEN AN AGGRESSIVE DRIVER AND A BAD DRIVER AT THE VERY LEAST. At the very most, they are the same and that is how I feel based on my 32 years experience as a licensed driver. To each his own.
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Old 08-06-2007, 05:59 PM
 
131 posts, read 646,219 times
Reputation: 49
Quote:
Originally Posted by i'minformed View Post
Hyde Park isn't really upstate NY.....just thought I'd throw that out there. But yes its true. people in the NYC region are pretty harsh drivers.

My mistake about Hyde Park.
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Old 08-06-2007, 06:01 PM
 
131 posts, read 646,219 times
Reputation: 49
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jason_Els View Post
You think we're bad? You should try New Jersey, Rhode Island or, even worse, Massachusetts. We look like a bunch of Germans compared to them.
Thanks, I heard that about those other places, especially JERSEY. A friend of mine lives there and she is preparing to get out.
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Old 08-06-2007, 06:29 PM
 
131 posts, read 646,219 times
Reputation: 49
Quote:
Originally Posted by honeychrome View Post
Everyone in the US complains about the way people in other states drive, that they drive like maniacs, etc., etc. With some exceptions, I think the driving habits of Americans are pretty uniform and the perception that drivers are bad in other states comes from lack of familiarity with the roads on the part of the visitor/new arrival. When you are a newcomer, you don't know your way around while most of those on the road with you you are locals and do- they're driving faster because they know the roads, know where they are going and want to get there fast. That said, compared to much of Europe, American drivers in general are pretty inattentive, ignorant of traffic laws and conventions and not particularly skilled at driving, however compared to the third world countries I've driven in Americans are pros!
When I drive in Indy, I usually give myself plenty of time TO AVOID DRIVING FASTER TO GET TO MY DESTINATION. I prefer driving within the speed limit and I only drive faster whenever I am on an interstate highway. I rarely use the beltway here because I have no need to do so. I can use secondary roads to get to my destination. Just a preference of mine. I am in general agreement with you, but not totally. Thanks.
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Old 08-06-2007, 06:48 PM
 
Location: NY
417 posts, read 1,885,042 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Rikrich View Post
I rarely use the beltway here because I have no need to do so. I can use secondary roads to get to my destination. Just a preference of mine.
I'm with you on the secondary roads- I'll happily add 1/3x more driving time just to be on a back road when I travel between cities or states. And while most everyone else is crawling along in bumper to bumper or high-speed white-knuckling it I'll be tooling along on a usually empty road looking at old barns, passing through sleepy little classic towns, etc. And it really is amazing that there is almost nobody on these roads! Of course one has to be able to read a map to travel this way and most people don't have a clue about that. And to bring it back to NY subject-wise... NY has some of the most amazing and beautiful back-roads in the country.
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Old 08-06-2007, 08:51 PM
 
Location: Warwick, NY
1,174 posts, read 5,887,383 times
Reputation: 1022
Ha! We're nothing. You haven't lived until you've driven in Turkey. The list is the funniest thing ever published by the Dept. of State.

Quote:
Drivers should drive defensively at all times and take every precaution while driving in Turkey. Drivers routinely ignore traffic regulations including driving through red lights and stop signs and turning left from the far right hand lane. These driving practices cause frequent traffic accidents. Statistics released by the Turkish State Statistics Institute indicate that daytime hours are the most dangerous times on local highways. In 2002 there were 407,103 accidents total in a country of around 68 million people. Also in 2002, 36,665 bus accidents were reported among the 120,000 registered buses in Turkey.

Drivers should be aware of several driving practices that are prevalent in Turkey. Normally drivers who experience car troubles or accidents pull over by the side of the road and turn on their emergency lights to warn other drivers, but many drivers place a large rock or a pile of rocks on the road about 10-15 meters behind their vehicles instead of turning on their emergency lights.

Drivers should exercise extreme caution while driving at night. The Embassy recommends that you not drive after dark outside of major cities. Some vehicles drive without their lights on or with very low lights, making it impossible to see them in advance. While driving, it is also not unusual to come across dead animals, rocks, or objects that have fallen from trucks such as fruits and vegetables.

Roads in Turkey run the full spectrum from single lane country roads to modern, divided, Trans-European motorways built to European standards. Highways in the southwestern, coastal portion of the country, which is frequented by tourists, are generally in good condition and well maintained.

DEFENSIVE MEASURES
  • Always wear seat belts. They can reduce injuries and save lives.
  • Children should ride in the back seat with seat belts on and/or in a child safety seat.
  • Drive defensively, defensively, defensively.
  • Dusk is a particularly dangerous time on intercity highways because most drivers delay turning on their headlights until well after dark. Oncoming traffic can be very difficult to see.
  • Situational awareness is imperative.
  • Use horn to alert pedestrians.
  • Use horn and lights to alert other drivers.
  • Pay attention when other drivers use their horns.
  • Check all mirrors, particularly the right side mirror, and use directional signals when changing lanes.
  • Confirm with direct visual check. Do not rely solely on mirrors.
  • Use four-way flashers to warn other drivers of slowed/blocked traffic to avoid being hit from behind.
  • Expect the unexpected.
  • Drive each day as though you were on a mission, the goal of which is not to be involved in an accident, cause an accident, or strike a pedestrian.
  • Watch out for trucks and buses that take the right-of-way without signaling, whether they are entitled to it or not.
  • Keep lights, signals, horn and brakes in proper working order.
  • Be extremely attentive and situationally aware during rain and snowstorms. Accidents increase dramatically during storms, particularly at night.
  • Assume nothing. Make no assumptions about what another driver may do or how they will react in a situation.
  • If confronted by another driver, stay in your car, lock the doors, and use your cell phone to call the police.
  • The maximum speed limit on the highway is 90 KM/hr; on the TEM and similar interstate-type highways, 120 KM/hr; and the maximum speed limit in the city is 50 KM/hr. Please note that all speed limit signs are posted in kilometers per hour and not miles per hour.

Pay particular attention to all of the following driving practices which are common in Ankara and Istanbul, as well as other parts of the country:
  • Passing on the right; cutting in from the right side.
  • Unexpected and unsignaled stops or turns.
  • Unexpected stops by cars, buses and trucks in various locations -- including main highway entrance ramps, intersections, and along major highways -- to pick up or drop off passengers.
  • Pedestrians walking or running in front of vehicles to cross streets and main highways, oblivious to oncoming traffic.
  • Unlit trucks parked at night in the driving lane of the highway rather than on the side of the road.
  • Disabled vehicles parked without warning signs.
  • Inattentive drivers.
  • Unskilled drivers.
  • Vehicles with faulty brakes.
  • Unexpected lane changes and stops by taxis, mini-buses (dolmus) and city buses.
  • Unlit tractors, horsecarts and farm vehicles traveling on highways at slow speed.
  • In the countryside accidents, breakdowns, and road work areas marked by stones rather than warning signs.
  • During rainstorms, slick surfaces due to oil on the roadway.
  • Smoother road surfaces with less traction than usual.
  • Vehicles reversing on exit ramps and on main highways.
  • Animals on highways.
  • In the countryside, herds of sheep, goats and other animals on roads.
  • Driving in the middle of the road and not yielding.
  • Passing on blind curves.
  • At night, unlit or partially lit vehicles.
  • Drivers flashing their headlights at oncoming vehicles.
  • Dangerous or destructive potholes.
  • Tailgating.
  • Drivers attempting to pass while you are passing another vehicle.
  • At unmarked intersections (i.e., no stop signs), primary road has right of way, but proceed with caution.
- U.S. Dept. of State and the Turkish Embassy
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Old 08-07-2007, 10:34 AM
 
Location: USA
1,106 posts, read 2,942,493 times
Reputation: 961
I'm from Upstate NY and I agree with Rachael84 about NYC drivers. They are horrible. I went down there for a concert last April, and those suckers were THE worst I have ever encountered. Where I live the people just drive like morons, and the people in Boston are pretty blood thirsty, but the NYC drivers are by far the most aggressive and rudest.
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Old 08-07-2007, 02:36 PM
 
Location: Beautiful Upstate NY!
13,814 posts, read 28,372,463 times
Reputation: 7615
hey...if you want to swim the sharks...you've got to become one, or risk being eaten. I'm not defending city drivers...but from what I see...it's the non-agressive types (from out of town) that cause the accidents down there. If you don't want to swim with the sharks...you can play it safe...mass-transit is your life raft.
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Old 08-07-2007, 02:52 PM
 
Location: NY
417 posts, read 1,885,042 times
Reputation: 440
I have to agree with JFK. There is a point when heading into NYC somewhere in Westchester where the tension level on the road skyrockets, the weaving and very tight tailgating starts, the horns start to blare.... In one way its exciting, as it signals one is heading into the belly of the beast, but its also pretty draining. And if you want real adrenaline, try it on a motorcycle- sure gets the riding technique in order fast as there is no room for error.
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