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Old 06-11-2013, 10:18 AM
 
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Can you compare the winter's in the Ithaca area to southern Maine, as far as wind, snowfall, temps and how long winter's last. I know that also in S Maine we lose power at least several times a year with heavy snowfall, and ice storms for days at a time (last year and the prior year not too bad) Usually 3-6 days a few times a year. Most snow falls come at 6" to 2.5 feet storms and seem to come regularly even weekly at times. Winter and snowfalls seem to last from Nov/Dec to at least April/May....and even now it's barely warm/hot (mid June)...that is besides the more protected coastal areas.

I know that the major cities get more snow, and also have lake effects, but what about the lower areas in the rural parts (I know Ithaca is milder from the Finger Lakes) and after you get a little further out towards the PA border is it milder or about the same?

Thanks!
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Old 06-11-2013, 01:28 PM
 
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This should help: Kittery, Maine Weather and Climate

Find Current Ithaca, New York Climate Data at Fizber
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Old 06-11-2013, 03:00 PM
 
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Just curious if any one had experienced both or lived in both, and could compare them for me, based on personal experience.
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Old 06-13-2013, 05:03 PM
 
Location: South Raleigh areas
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If you're looking personal experience as opposed to statistical information ckthankgod provided, you're gonna find few people have lived in both. However, I've lived in the general Ithaca area--the Southern Tier. So my answer is given based off of experience with nothing scientific...

You'll receive your first snowfall around early to mid-October. The winters generally last through April, as far as temps, although its not uncommon to get a May flurry. I would say that its rare, if ever, to get to lows below 5 degrees, but that is bone-chilling cold, and lows in the 5-20 range are common in January and February. The highs during winter drop to the 20s in the same period, with November/December having more 30/40 degree days and March/April about the same, with occasional 50s. As far as snowfall, I would guess that there wont be as much snow as you get in Maine, but snow is pretty consistent throughout the November-April winter. Meaning, flurries and/or light, steady snowfall (that lasts a whole day) are common a few times a week, with an occasional storm dumping 6-plus inches, which I'd say happens 3 times a winter at minumum...

NY DOT is on their game, though, so you really dont have to worry about how the roads will look or if they are manageable. Ithaca is surrounded by hilly, wooded, rural areas to all sides, but the drive is fine. I've driven back and forth between Ithaca and Elmira dozens of times in the winter. So my overall synopsis would be that you being from Maine would have no problems with a winter in Ithaca...
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Old 06-14-2013, 05:10 AM
 
Location: Auckland, NZ
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In a normal winter, Portland, ME receives 70 inches and Portsmouth, NH 60. The past winter featured frequent and high impact snowstorms. It was an above average snow season for most in New England.

In the Finger Lakes, you'll get frequent snows from December to March, adding up to about the same amount as what you are used to (Ithaca averages 70 inches per winter season). The snow generally has a lower water content (i.e. more powdery) so you are less prone to power outages. Other parts of the Finger Lakes average a little more. No major changes closer to the PA border.
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Old 06-19-2013, 01:22 PM
 
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Thanks! That is helpful. Maine snows can be very wet and heavy/damp. Depending on where and how far to the coast. Plus the abundance of pine and spruce trees. Both Portland and Portsmouth are pretty close to the coast, and I was more inland, with what seemed like 2-4" more snow at each fall. Shoveling can be brutal when it's damp, and when it starts to melt, but them over night the temps drop so low it re-freezes creating a very hard layer that you have to pick at...makes it almost impossible to remove!

The sound similar in length and av snowfall anyway. I am currently in SE PA, and I feel like we hardly get snow here at all. Even if it falls a foot or 2, it's gone with in the week...back to mud. And it's all clay soil here, so Winter's are nasty!

Dreamshot, really above average snow? My folks are still living there, and said for the most part, they had a mild winter, with periods of total melting. (where you could see the grass for a few days...which like never happens! haha)
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Old 06-19-2013, 02:36 PM
 
Location: Auckland, NZ
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Quote:
Originally Posted by southernNE View Post
Dreamshot, really above average snow? My folks are still living there, and said for the most part, they had a mild winter, with periods of total melting. (where you could see the grass for a few days...which like never happens! haha)
The winter, temperature wise for most of the Northeast/New England, was about average. While I can't tell you exactly (at this instant) how much snow that say Portland ME got last winter season (I can check the database when I get to work tomorrow), Worcester MA received 100+ inches [one of the snowiest winters on record]. Much of the New England/Northeast Corridor saw slightly above average to moderately above average snowfall last winter season, thanks especially to the storm colloquially known as "Nemo."

My job requires me to be extremely well versed on the weather each and every day
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Old 06-20-2013, 11:57 AM
 
Location: Auckland, NZ
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Just to RE my last post. While I'm not sure where exactly you are in southern Maine, but I'm sure Portland's tallies are fairly representative. Here's what I came up with:



Portland received ~97.6 inches last winter season (with a remarkable 49.5 of it coming in February alone), besting its average by roughly 27.6 inches.
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Old 06-20-2013, 12:31 PM
 
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I have spent a fair amount of time in both the Finger Lakes area and Portland, ME. The only thing to me that makes Ithaca much more challenging is the amount of gray days. I have no data (this is anecdotal), but I have experienced more days on end of winter clouds in Ithaca than I have in Maine, Vermont, or Minnesota, all of which are undoubtedly northern areas of the US. In New England, it may still be cold but you get more sunshine. I couldn't live in the Finger Lakes area specifically for this reason: the winters are too darn gray!
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Old 06-20-2013, 07:53 PM
 
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Ithaca isn't very snowy. Winters really are more drizzly than anything. Much of the snow comes in spurts, with bare ground in between, though some years it sticks around longer than others. Only in the forested hills does the snow cover stay from December through March. It rains every January, for instance. I doubt the temperatures are much different. Kind of depends what you mean by "southern Maine."
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