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Old 04-17-2017, 07:14 AM
 
61,740 posts, read 87,239,875 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JWRocks View Post
Even the NY Times doesn't like the "free" education

https://www.nytimes.com/2017/04/14/o...Fnyregion&_r=0
A lot of this has been addressed in posts above, as while there are private schools that should be concerned, a lot of this will depend on the aid a student gets. In some cases, it is better to go to the private school. Even with say Syracuse University's Remitted Tuition/Tuition Exchange program, in some cases, it is better or pretty even in terms of going to the private school versus the state/public school.


Also, the median household cap for this Excelsior Scholarship is essentially double the state median household income. So, to say that those that make double the state median household income doesn't really make sense. NY's median household income is $60,850 according to 2015 census data and the cap is $100k, then go to $110k and then $125k. It sounds more like those that are in the in between say $50k and the cap will benefit the most, with perhaps those that are from lower to lower middle class median household incomes perhaps having to become commuter students in order to offset some of the room and board costs. This will also depend on other factors, which have mentioned earlier in the thread.


With all of this said, there are some real concerns and it will be interesting to see what comes of this.
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Old 04-17-2017, 07:52 AM
 
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Yeah, well you totally missed my point, which is:


THE NEW YORK TIMES DOESN'T LIKE IT
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Old 04-17-2017, 08:56 AM
 
61,740 posts, read 87,239,875 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JWRocks View Post
Yeah, well you totally missed my point, which is:


THE NEW YORK TIMES DOESN'T LIKE IT
I got that, as people wouldn't expect that. I'm just addressing some of the points he mentioned in the article.


Perhaps Mr. Brooks is an individual on the matter and he just so happens to work for the Times.


Here's an article referring to the residential requirement after college: What New Yorkers don't like about the new free tuition
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Old 04-17-2017, 10:40 AM
 
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Too bad that people don't realize that it's all these "free" give away programs that makes NYS unaffordable for jobs to be created here, causing people to need to leave.


And shame on someone who wants to take the "free" stuff and then leave. The whole concept of taxpayers funding k-12 schools was that each subsequent generation would finance the next. That hasn't worked out to well either.
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Old 04-19-2017, 06:32 AM
 
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Any thoughts on this - I asked my son if those outside the state - could come to NY - live here for a year either working or maybe being a part time student and after a year apply for this program. What qualifies someone as a resident?

If we had an influx of students that do this if it's possible - then you are losing all the money they would have paid as out of state students and you make the job pool that much smaller.
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Old 04-19-2017, 06:51 AM
 
61,740 posts, read 87,239,875 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by xray731 View Post
Any thoughts on this - I asked my son if those outside the state - could come to NY - live here for a year either working or maybe being a part time student and after a year apply for this program. What qualifies someone as a resident?

If we had an influx of students that do this if it's possible - then you are losing all the money they would have paid as out of state students and you make the job pool that much smaller.
This should explain everything: https://www.suny.edu/smarttrack/residency/


What you may get are say HS students that may have moved South or out of state and that still have family in the state possibly returning to live with family and go to HS in the state in order to qualify. They would have to be the guardian of that family member that owns the home, if I'm not mistaken though.


I knew of an employee at a private university that would take in nieces and nephews and become their legal guardian in order for them to take advantage of the educational benefit that they had through their employment. So, it wouldn't be something new if people did such a thing.


This is a new development in terms of the residency requirement: http://www.nystateofpolitics.com/201...-tuition-plan/


I'm also curious if a person lives in NY, but worked in an adjacent state, what occurs in terms of the residence or loan requirement?
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Old 04-22-2017, 07:24 AM
 
Location: In the heights
26,342 posts, read 26,274,516 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ex New Yorker View Post
Well let me put it to you this way. When Cuomo announces that the state will provide free tuition at its universities and community colleges, then why would any outside source continue with financial assistance programs or award scholarships and grants? Especially when the taxpayers of the State of New York will be on the hook and not them. Just as funds for the Clinton Foundation have dried up since the Clinton's are no longer in public office. There's nothing to be gained. It's as if some benevolent benefactor comes in and said that they're going to pick up the cost of your mortgage or car loan. Would you then continue to pay? Somehow I doubt it. It's just human nature. You'd better be careful of what you have wished for. As always taxpayer money is an endless resource that is always ripe for the taking by any and all takers.

My math is based on actual tuition costs and there is nothing in those articles indicating whether scholarships, grants or financial assistance programs will continue after this program is fully implemented. There is no guarantee of that. My guess and it's only a guess is that they will not. You can expect backlash from the rest of the country as far as federal funds are concerned. Why should residents of other states be forced using their federal taxpayer dollars to subsidize New York's state colleges and universities? What will they get in return? As those who graduate will have to stay and work in New York. If not they will have to pay the money back. Tough luck if they can't find work in New York. In which case they would have been better off going to college elsewhere. At least they would have the freedom to seek employment anywhere throughout the country and world.

I don't understand your last sentence. "Tuition free college for NY residents might mean future generations of New Yorkers will be better at these things." Be better at what things? You really do not need a college degree to figure this all out. It's just another great big government boondoggle.
I don't understand what you're saying. Do you understand how college financing works? It's last mile financing on the state's end and that's not something that FAFSA for federal loans puts as you haven't gotten your state funds until after you get your federal ones. For expected tuition from third-party sources, yes, some of them will ask you about other sources and others will not. There's a large gamut of rules about third-party resources. The payment for the state's last mile is going to come out of state taxpayer's money, that's definitely true which is why this is basically a kind of redistribution to middle class families essentially. I don't see how this forces federal money to go additionally into the state anymore than it would have regardless since it doesn't change federal funding formulas (how would Cuomo and NY state be able to single-handedly push that through?). We should hope for a day that New Yorkers get a decent education where they won't make such odd leaps in logic. Unfortunately, I think trying to address that at the university level is too late.
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Old 04-22-2017, 09:33 AM
 
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Gee, high school is "free" too. However, they are "graduating" some of them that basically have a 6th grade education. Now we need to provide "free" college just to bring them up to high school level. Maybe it would be better to focus on education at the lower levels, whereby students would actually be better prepared to attend college.
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Old 04-22-2017, 02:47 PM
 
3,952 posts, read 2,213,611 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by OyCrumbler View Post
I don't understand what you're saying. Do you understand how college financing works? It's last mile financing on the state's end and that's not something that FAFSA for federal loans puts as you haven't gotten your state funds until after you get your federal ones. For expected tuition from third-party sources, yes, some of them will ask you about other sources and others will not. There's a large gamut of rules about third-party resources. The payment for the state's last mile is going to come out of state taxpayer's money, that's definitely true which is why this is basically a kind of redistribution to middle class families essentially. I don't see how this forces federal money to go additionally into the state anymore than it would have regardless since it doesn't change federal funding formulas (how would Cuomo and NY state be able to single-handedly push that through?). We should hope for a day that New Yorkers get a decent education where they won't make such odd leaps in logic. Unfortunately, I think trying to address that at the university level is too late.
That's obvious, let's leave it at that.
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Old 05-27-2017, 05:45 PM
 
Location: Raleigh. North Carolina
31 posts, read 55,173 times
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I am a former New Yorker, midhusdon area. I have 4 kids, one who graduated with his AA and is about to start his Bachelors at a 4 year university ( about 20,000 per year full time including room and board). I have one graduating high school in a few days, starting community college ( 2 plus 2 to get bachelors). One is in high school and one is about to start middle school. Considering moving into my former home, since it's paid for and I could be with my parent. Would it be worth the move? How long does one have to live in Ny in order to qualify for the free tuition? There is a SUNY in the town I would move to.
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