Welcome to City-Data.com Forum!
U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > New York
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 05-29-2019, 10:50 AM
 
94,136 posts, read 124,962,356 times
Reputation: 18313

Advertisements

Once again, Saratoga is leading the way when it comes to upstate population growth.

City and village population estimates for July 2018 were released this morning by the U.S. Census, and the city of Saratoga Springs has had more growth than any other city in the state since 2010.

That's by percentage, of course; New York City outgained it in numeric growth by a few hundred thousand people.

So far, the Census has released 2018 estimates on state populations, county populations and now city and village populations. Estimates for town populations across the state will be out in the next few months.

While cities have accounted for most of the nation's population growth over the past two decades, New York's cities have not kept up since 2010. Of the 62 cities in the state, only 13 have grown in population this decade, according to the Census estimates.

The biggest losers in population are some of upstate's biggest cities: Syracuse, Binghamton, Rochester and Buffalo. Combined, those cities have lost more than 14,000 residents since 2010.

To see more data, check out the slideshow above, which lists the 10 fastest-growing cities by percent growth in the state — and the 10 fastest-shrinking cities as well.

Source: https://www.bizjournals.com/albany/n...ties-2018.html

https://www.bizjournals.com/albany/n...tml#g/454619/1

Only surprises may be Cohoes in on the growth side and Beacon on the loss side.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 05-30-2019, 02:39 PM
 
Location: Appalachian New York, Formerly Louisiana
4,409 posts, read 6,572,084 times
Reputation: 6254
14,000 combined from those four is not much at all though.

Binghamton would probably feel it the hardest.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-30-2019, 06:00 PM
 
1,541 posts, read 1,690,080 times
Reputation: 2146
I'm surprised it's only a loss of 14K over almost 10 years.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-30-2019, 08:14 PM
 
94,136 posts, read 124,962,356 times
Reputation: 18313
Quote:
Originally Posted by MrJones17 View Post
I'm surprised it's only a loss of 14K over almost 10 years.
That sounds about right, as the decline in population in those cities has slowed down considerably in recent years, between immigration/refugee resettlement, some younger folks moving into those cities and some other factors(college enrollment/living, migrants from more expensive cities in the state/region and empty nesters also moving back into cities, among others).
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-15-2019, 06:36 AM
 
Location: NY
16,217 posts, read 6,964,022 times
Reputation: 12499
[quote=ckhthankgod;55294453]Once again, Saratoga is leading the way when it comes to upstate population growth.

City and village population estimates for July 2018 were released this morning by the U.S. Census, and the city of Saratoga Springs has had more growth than any other city in the state since 2010.

That's by percentage, of course; New York City outgained it in numeric growth by a few hundred thousand people.

The biggest losers in population are some of upstate's biggest cities: Syracuse, Binghamton, Rochester and Buffalo. Combined, those cities have lost more than 14,000 residents since 2010.
/QUOTE]




....and what do all these cities have in commmon?
An impoverished population making up more than 10% of the total population and
an extremely high crime rate.


Syracuse 29%
Binghamton 13%
Rochester 41%
Buffalo 38%

These are the sad but true statistical facts.
Property owners refuse to invest and Citizens refuse to subjugate themselves to these living conditions.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-15-2019, 12:25 PM
 
94,136 posts, read 124,962,356 times
Reputation: 18313
[quote=Mr.Retired;55430263]
Quote:
Originally Posted by ckhthankgod View Post
Once again, Saratoga is leading the way when it comes to upstate population growth.

City and village population estimates for July 2018 were released this morning by the U.S. Census, and the city of Saratoga Springs has had more growth than any other city in the state since 2010.

That's by percentage, of course; New York City outgained it in numeric growth by a few hundred thousand people.

The biggest losers in population are some of upstate's biggest cities: Syracuse, Binghamton, Rochester and Buffalo. Combined, those cities have lost more than 14,000 residents since 2010.
/QUOTE]




....and what do all these cities have in commmon?
An impoverished population making up more than 10% of the total population and
an extremely high crime rate.


Syracuse 29%
Binghamton 13%
Rochester 41%
Buffalo 38%

These are the sad but true statistical facts.
Property owners refuse to invest and Citizens refuse to subjugate themselves to these living conditions.
That’s not it...Parts of those cities have high poverty and crime rates, but parts of those cities don’t and are middle class. I’d say that deindustrialization and policy aspects are better answers.

To be honest, given the total population of those cities(about 655,000 people), that isn’t that big of a population decline for that period of time.

If anything, those cities are also seeing some development in parts of them and plans are in place for more to where they are going to look different within 5-10 years.

BTW-What is the point of using those percentages for those cities and what do they have to do with this topic? I know what they are, but I’m curious as to your point.

Last edited by ckhthankgod; 06-15-2019 at 01:13 PM..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-21-2019, 10:46 AM
 
Location: Del Rio, TN
39,922 posts, read 26,634,232 times
Reputation: 25846
Quote:
Originally Posted by MrJones17 View Post
I'm surprised it's only a loss of 14K over almost 10 years.
You may well see that pick up again, especially if the Carbon Tax is passed. If the increased taxes, especially on energy, don't drive individuals out, the loss of jobs as even more businesses flee the state likely will.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-21-2019, 01:10 PM
 
94,136 posts, read 124,962,356 times
Reputation: 18313
Quote:
Originally Posted by Toyman at Jewel Lake View Post
You may well see that pick up again, especially if the Carbon Tax is passed. If the increased taxes, especially on energy, don't drive individuals out, the loss of jobs as even more businesses flee the state likely will.
If anything, there are more jobs opening up as older workers retire. So, you may see more younger workers consider job openings in these areas.

Immigration has helped to minimize population losses as well.

Keep in mind that the numbers are for the city propers
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-21-2019, 04:59 PM
 
5,787 posts, read 4,166,439 times
Reputation: 5019
Let's see, reduce the carbon to zero, but increase manufacturing jobs??? That's what's known as catering to every one and pleasing no one. Some leadership, please!!!
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-22-2019, 11:10 PM
 
Location: In the heights
37,308 posts, read 39,707,291 times
Reputation: 21376
Quote:
Originally Posted by JWRocks View Post
Let's see, reduce the carbon to zero, but increase manufacturing jobs??? That's what's known as catering to every one and pleasing no one. Some leadership, please!!!
Well, if the process is to have your electrical generation have zero carbon emissions during generation, then doesn't that mean your options are essentially to build new electrical generation sources? I think some sources that do so are solar power, hydroelectricity, and wind turbines. To do that you'd probably need to manufacture some things. The two current and projected fastest growing occupations for the US are both renewable energy jobs: https://www.bls.gov/ooh/fastest-growing.htm

Part of this is because the cost per kilowatt of both panels and turbines have gone down so much that they are competitive with or cheaper than other electrical generation sources, so this is more of jumping on the bandwagon kind of moment. The median pay for the two aforementioned jobs are $42,680 per year and $54,370 per year which aren't princely sums, but can support a pretty decent life in some parts of the state.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply

Quick Reply
Message:




Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > New York

All times are GMT -6.

© 2005-2024, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Contact Us - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35, 36, 37 - Top