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Old 05-04-2020, 12:53 PM
 
Location: California
1,726 posts, read 1,416,137 times
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Thank you to all of those who have replied to my initial post thus far.

I suppose the point I am attempting to convey is, although Albany and New York City suburbs in the Hudson River Valley are equally as safe and wealthy as Rochester suburbs with similar demographics, the Rochester suburbs, from an outsider perspective at least, seem tidier and more charming. One of the major components of this charm is walkable downtown areas, which seem more common in the Rochester area than in the Hudson River Valley. In the Albany area in particular, many of the suburbs have no center of gravity. For example, towns such as Colonie and East Greenbush are bisected by major, commercialized thoroughfares with no real or true downtown areas. In many ways, this style of development feels out of character for the Northeast region.
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Old 05-04-2020, 02:03 PM
 
78,035 posts, read 105,998,977 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bert_from_back_East View Post
Thank you to all of those who have replied to my initial post thus far.

I suppose the point I am attempting to convey is, although Albany and New York City suburbs in the Hudson River Valley are equally as safe and wealthy as Rochester suburbs with similar demographics, the Rochester suburbs, from an outsider perspective at least, seem tidier and more charming. One of the major components of this charm is walkable downtown areas, which seem more common in the Rochester area than in the Hudson River Valley. In the Albany area in particular, many of the suburbs have no center of gravity. For example, towns such as Colonie and East Greenbush are bisected by major, commercialized thoroughfares with no real or true downtown areas. In many ways, this style of development feels out of character for the Northeast region.
On the other hand, you do have Delmar(Town of Bethlehem) and Scotia, which are suburban areas with walk ability, in the same metro area as those 2 towns. So, it can vary, but as mentioned earlier, the other bigger Upstate areas tend to have more villages surrounding those cities.

Even in the NYC area, you can find suburbs with minimal to no walk ability as well.
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Old 05-04-2020, 07:26 PM
Status: "Proud communist" (set 22 days ago)
 
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The further away from lower NY, the nicer it gets. ENY is much more convenient for the flatlanders to travel. Whatever they touch turns to crap.
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Old 05-04-2020, 07:43 PM
 
Location: Østenfor sol og vestenfor måne
17,932 posts, read 22,358,077 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hotkarl View Post
The further away from lower NY, the nicer it gets. ENY is much more convenient for the flatlanders to travel. Whatever they touch turns to crap.
One thing is for sure, rancor and snobbery is not limited to "lower NY".
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Old 05-04-2020, 07:52 PM
Status: "Proud communist" (set 22 days ago)
 
16,677 posts, read 17,162,453 times
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Originally Posted by ABQConvict View Post
One thing is for sure, rancor and snobbery is not limited to "lower NY".
True, but it's a different strain of snobbery.
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Old 05-05-2020, 08:01 AM
 
78,035 posts, read 105,998,977 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ckhthankgod View Post
On the other hand, you do have Delmar(Town of Bethlehem) and Scotia, which are suburban areas with walk ability, in the same metro area as those 2 towns. So, it can vary, but as mentioned earlier, the other bigger Upstate areas tend to have more villages surrounding those cities.

Even in the NYC area, you can find suburbs with minimal to no walk ability as well.
Streetviews for Delmar and Scotia, Delmar: https://www.google.com/maps/@42.6222...2!9m2!1b1!2i37

Scotia: https://www.google.com/maps/@42.8255...2!9m2!1b1!2i37
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Old 05-06-2020, 07:10 AM
 
78,035 posts, read 105,998,977 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bert_from_back_East View Post
In Monroe County, I visited the following towns and villages:
  • East Rochester
  • Fairport
  • Honeoye Falls
  • Penfield
  • Pittsford
Let me start off by saying, "Wow!" I was certainly not expecting towns and villages in the Rochester metropolitan area to be so charming and quaint. In my perspective, many of the towns and villages in Monroe County are tidier and in better repair than most towns and villages in the Hudson Valley, despite the cash on hand of wealthy city-slickers. Obviously, the Rochester metropolitan area is less densely populated and has flatter terrain than the Hudson Valley, so of course, Monroe County seems less crowded and more open. From an urban development standpoint, structures in the Rochester suburbs appear to have deeper road frontage than communities in the Hudson Valley, which allows for more tree-lined streets with sidewalks. This style of development is more common in western New England, eastern Long Island and much of Michigan. In areas of New York State that were initially settled and developed by Dutch people, such as the Nyack and Poughkeepsie, for example, commercial buildings and residential homes are closer together, have very little road frontage and, by my accord, are generally shoddier.

Outside of Monroe County, I had the opportunity to visit and explore the following hamlets and villages:
  • Avon
  • Geneseo
  • Canandaigua
  • Victor
In addition to the communities listed above, I drove through Bloomfield and West Bloomfield, but did not stop in either of those hamlets, since they are both small with limited public space.

IMO, all of those towns generally lacked the tiredness that is pervasive in many small towns of Eastern New York, such as Brewster (Putnam County), Champlain (Clinton County), Chester (Orange County), Kingston (Ulster County) or Whitehall (Washington County), for example. This leads me to believe that the Western New York towns were settled and developed during a different era and by a different crowd and have more local wealth and pride.
Some street views of the communities listed...

East Rochester: https://www.google.com/maps/@43.1130...2!9m2!1b1!2i37

Fairport: https://www.google.com/maps/@43.1006...2!9m2!1b1!2i37

Honeoye Falls: https://www.google.com/maps/@42.9532...6!9m2!1b1!2i37

Penfield(hamlet): https://www.google.com/maps/@43.1300...2!9m2!1b1!2i37

Pittsford: https://www.google.com/maps/@43.0908...2!9m2!1b1!2i37

Avon: https://www.google.com/maps/@42.9121...2!9m2!1b1!2i37

Geneseo: https://www.google.com/maps/@42.7971...6!9m2!1b1!2i37

Canandaigua: https://www.google.com/maps/@42.8873...2!9m2!1b1!2i37

Victor: https://www.google.com/maps/@42.9824...2!9m2!1b1!2i37
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Old 05-06-2020, 07:36 AM
 
4,063 posts, read 2,721,895 times
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Unfortunately, you can't judge walkability by a google screenshot. A dozen clustered
brick buildings doesn't make a walkable community. 2 examples for sure would be Penfield and Victor, maybe others
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Old 05-06-2020, 07:58 AM
 
78,035 posts, read 105,998,977 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JWRocks View Post
Unfortunately, you can't judge walkability by a google screenshot. A dozen clustered
brick buildings doesn't make a walkable community. 2 examples for sure would be Penfield and Victor, maybe others
You can actually go through each community listed to help see what the walk ability situation looks like. I just started at the center or Downtown of each community.

Penfield is just a town, with maybe some walk ability in the center of the hamlet, but villages tend to have some degree of walk ability due to having sidewalks that connect people from the neighborhoods to the village "downtown".

You have a source like this: https://www.walkscore.com/ , but even that leaves some things out that could help accurately calculate the walk ability of a neighborhood or community. It does give a rough idea though.
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Old 05-08-2020, 11:51 AM
 
Location: Deep in the Woods
2,952 posts, read 3,415,757 times
Reputation: 4039
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bert_from_back_East View Post
Thank you to all of those who have replied to my initial post thus far.

I suppose the point I am attempting to convey is, although Albany and New York City suburbs in the Hudson River Valley are equally as safe and wealthy as Rochester suburbs with similar demographics, the Rochester suburbs, from an outsider perspective at least, seem tidier and more charming. One of the major components of this charm is walkable downtown areas, which seem more common in the Rochester area than in the Hudson River Valley. In the Albany area in particular, many of the suburbs have no center of gravity. For example, towns such as Colonie and East Greenbush are bisected by major, commercialized thoroughfares with no real or true downtown areas. In many ways, this style of development feels out of character for the Northeast region.
I have to say, I pretty much agree with this 100%. I've said many times on here how western NY feels more like old fashioned Americana, which is a feel that I don't get in Eastern NY. This is what I like about NYS so much, each region has its own flavor. There's not many better places to be in America from Memorial Day until Halloween, imo, than the Finger Lakes and western NY. The weather is generally excellent and its a great place to be outside, swimming in a lake, fishing, camping, canoeing, etc.
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