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Old 07-09-2013, 09:27 PM
 
Location: SW FL
864 posts, read 1,501,418 times
Reputation: 866

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I had a very intriguing discussion with my mother the other day about young people's expectations and behavior today vs young people's expectations/behavior when my mom was growing up. It didn't take much time to drill down to one concrete difference between these two lifestyles.
It all started with me remarking to my mom how incredibly boring and under stimulating it must have been growing up on a small farm in a small rural community in Illinois. Her response was that while it obviously wasn't the most exciting time in her life, it wasn't as big of a deal back then because she didnt feel that it was always necessary to be entertained. I thought about that statement and how much kids rely on iPhones/iPads, and whatever other gadgets may be at hand to get through the day. Facebook/Snapchat/Twitter/etc, are all mediums through which young people attempt to entertain themselves constantly through psuedosocial stimulation. It in turn causes them to be more skittish, antsy, entitled, and overall less inclined to put up with arduous tasks or situations which are not necessarily stimulating. I recently attended an orientation for incoming freshman at my new school and noticed this dynamic at play frequently. Sure, these events are very, very trite, arduous and tedious at times, but overall I don't think it necessitates resorting to the phone every minute as a reprieve. I observed a kid in the middle of an important lecture bemoaning over snap chat about how tired and bored he was. Personally I don't think the dramatism is necessarily. After all, many parts of life are not very exciting and that shouldn't be viewed as a foreign concept.
There's a good read on this subject called: The Shallows: What the Internet is Doing to Our Brains. Interestingly enough, it's required reading for all incoming freshman at my new school.
Nicholas Carr on What the Internet is Doing to Our Brains
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Old 07-09-2013, 10:16 PM
 
Location: Tucson for awhile longer
8,874 posts, read 14,380,393 times
Reputation: 29083
That was insightful. And thanks for the link.

I've come to believe that, due to constant stimulation from electronic media, people's brains (my own included) have been fundamentally altered to require constant change. Attentions spans have crashed. I honestly don't know how young people raised on this kind of technology can learn anything. Any amount of detail or nuance has to be constructed like a puzzle because whole stories are rarely presented fully and certainly not without interruption.

Just look at the way information such as news and sports coverage is presented today. The successful programs feature multiple speakers. No one person talks for more than a few minutes before the speaker is switched. The entire time a camera is on a talking head, there are usually monitors filled with various moving pictures in the background. If not monitors, then there are just patterns and lights jumping around their heads. In the foreground are multiple chyrons presenting information, usually on a completely different topic. Information is given in soundbites. The amount presented between commercials is dished out as 1. quick summary, 2. a bit more detail, 3. someone's opinion about what was said, 4. a teaser about what will come next, then 5. an segue to the commercials.

The speakers, of course, are usually chosen for their looks as well as their ability to make the subjects sound exciting through their inflection. The voices don't even have to be pleasant, just attention-getting. An unnecessary tone of urgency, ending sentences on an upswing or with a question, even when a statement is made, are preferred. Vocabulary is dumbed-down, the grammar is often terrible, and there is no longer any effort made to erase regional accents. But it's all presented quickly, accompanied by digital graphics. People who aren't good at this will get criticism in 140 characters that will have a negative impact on their careers, teachers included. It matters not a whit that the people at the OP's college orientation NEED to know the information that was presented and will have to bother someone later for person-to-person instructions because they paid no attention when they were given necessary instructions. College's fault, not the student's.

But try to present an entire story uninterrupted, with detail, analysis, and nuance, and you will be told that you are too boring. The listeners will reject you by turning the channel, and if a remote isn't present, they'll just pick up their phones. I hosted a family birthday dinner in honor of my 20-year-old niece recently. Two times during the dinner conversation, at the table, the guest of honor used her hand-held device. BUT SO DID HER MOTHER. It's no longer valid to blame this solely on the young.

I've gone on too long already? Gotta go!
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Old 07-09-2013, 10:23 PM
 
Location: SW FL
864 posts, read 1,501,418 times
Reputation: 866
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jukesgrrl View Post
That was insightful. And thanks for the link.

I've come to believe that, due to constant stimulation from electronic media, people's brains (my own included) have been fundamentally altered to require constant change. Attentions spans have crashed. I honestly don't know how young people raised on this kind of technology can learn anything. Any amount of detail or nuance has to be constructed like a puzzle because whole stories are rarely presented fully and certainly not without interruption.

Just look at the way information such as news and sports coverage is presented today. The successful programs feature multiple speakers. No one person talks for more than a few minutes before the speaker is switched. The entire time a camera is on a talking head, there are usually monitors filled with various moving pictures in the background. If not monitors, then there are just patterns and lights jumping around their heads. In the foreground are multiple chyrons presenting information, usually on a completely different topic. Information is given in soundbites. The amount presented between commercials is dished out as 1. quick summary, 2. a bit more detail, 3. someone's opinion about what was said, 4. a teaser about what will come next, then 5. an segue to the commercials. The speakers, of course, are usually chosen for their looks as well as their ability to make the subjects sound exciting through their inflection. The voices don't even have to be pleasant, just attention-getting. An unnecessary tone of urgency, ending sentences on an upswing or with a question, even when a statement is made, are preferred. Vocabulary is dumbed-down, the grammar is often terrible, and there is no longer any effort made to erase regional accents. But it's all presented quickly, accompanied by digital graphics. People who aren't good at this will get criticism in 140 characters that will have a negative impact on their careers, teachers included.

But try to present an entire story uninterrupted, with detail, analysis, and nuance, and you will be told that you are too boring. The listeners will reject you by turning the channel, and if a remote isn't present, they'll just pick up their phones. I hosted a family birthday dinner in honor of my 20-year-old niece recently. Two times during the dinner conversation the guest of honor checked things on her phone. BUT SO DID HER MOTHER. There's no longer any use in blaming this solely on the young.

I've gone on too long already? Gotta go!
I strongly agree that the media in general is quite glamorous about how they present things based on this phenomenon. The examples you listed are typical not only for sports coverage, but also virtually any mainstream television program that is aimed at relaying information to an audience.
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Old 07-09-2013, 11:06 PM
 
1,866 posts, read 2,386,864 times
Reputation: 1458
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jukesgrrl View Post
That was insightful. And thanks for the link.

I've come to believe that, due to constant stimulation from electronic media, people's brains (my own included) have been fundamentally altered to require constant change. Attentions spans have crashed. I honestly don't know how young people raised on this kind of technology can learn anything. Any amount of detail or nuance has to be constructed like a puzzle because whole stories are rarely presented fully and certainly not without interruption.

Just look at the way information such as news and sports coverage is presented today. The successful programs feature multiple speakers. No one person talks for more than a few minutes before the speaker is switched. The entire time a camera is on a talking head, there are usually monitors filled with various moving pictures in the background. If not monitors, then there are just patterns and lights jumping around their heads. In the foreground are multiple chyrons presenting information, usually on a completely different topic. Information is given in soundbites. The amount presented between commercials is dished out as 1. quick summary, 2. a bit more detail, 3. someone's opinion about what was said, 4. a teaser about what will come next, then 5. an segue to the commercials.

The speakers, of course, are usually chosen for their looks as well as their ability to make the subjects sound exciting through their inflection. The voices don't even have to be pleasant, just attention-getting. An unnecessary tone of urgency, ending sentences on an upswing or with a question, even when a statement is made, are preferred. Vocabulary is dumbed-down, the grammar is often terrible, and there is no longer any effort made to erase regional accents. But it's all presented quickly, accompanied by digital graphics. People who aren't good at this will get criticism in 140 characters that will have a negative impact on their careers, teachers included. It matters not a whit that the people at the OP's college orientation NEED to know the information that was presented and will have to bother someone later for person-to-person instructions because they paid no attention when they were given necessary instructions. College's fault, not the student's.

But try to present an entire story uninterrupted, with detail, analysis, and nuance, and you will be told that you are too boring. The listeners will reject you by turning the channel, and if a remote isn't present, they'll just pick up their phones. I hosted a family birthday dinner in honor of my 20-year-old niece recently. Two times during the dinner conversation, at the table, the guest of honor used her hand-held device. BUT SO DID HER MOTHER. It's no longer valid to blame this solely on the young.

I've gone on too long already? Gotta go!
I like this!! ^^
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Old 07-10-2013, 12:11 AM
 
91 posts, read 170,136 times
Reputation: 115
I agree with everything you people said. Have you heard of the phenomenon nature deficit disorder? It basically boils down to the fact that the younger generation is getting further and further away from nature, meaning they're not getting their hands dirty like us kids used to. iPads have replaced tree houses.

If I ever have children I will transform them into mowgli.
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Old 07-10-2013, 12:13 AM
 
91 posts, read 170,136 times
Reputation: 115
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jukesgrrl View Post
That was insightful. And thanks for the link.

I've come to believe that, due to constant stimulation from electronic media, people's brains (my own included) have been fundamentally altered to require constant change. Attentions spans have crashed. I honestly don't know how young people raised on this kind of technology can learn anything. Any amount of detail or nuance has to be constructed like a puzzle because whole stories are rarely presented fully and certainly not without interruption.

Just look at the way information such as news and sports coverage is presented today. The successful programs feature multiple speakers. No one person talks for more than a few minutes before the speaker is switched. The entire time a camera is on a talking head, there are usually monitors filled with various moving pictures in the background. If not monitors, then there are just patterns and lights jumping around their heads. In the foreground are multiple chyrons presenting information, usually on a completely different topic. Information is given in soundbites. The amount presented between commercials is dished out as 1. quick summary, 2. a bit more detail, 3. someone's opinion about what was said, 4. a teaser about what will come next, then 5. an segue to the commercials.

The speakers, of course, are usually chosen for their looks as well as their ability to make the subjects sound exciting through their inflection. The voices don't even have to be pleasant, just attention-getting. An unnecessary tone of urgency, ending sentences on an upswing or with a question, even when a statement is made, are preferred. Vocabulary is dumbed-down, the grammar is often terrible, and there is no longer any effort made to erase regional accents. But it's all presented quickly, accompanied by digital graphics. People who aren't good at this will get criticism in 140 characters that will have a negative impact on their careers, teachers included. It matters not a whit that the people at the OP's college orientation NEED to know the information that was presented and will have to bother someone later for person-to-person instructions because they paid no attention when they were given necessary instructions. College's fault, not the student's.

But try to present an entire story uninterrupted, with detail, analysis, and nuance, and you will be told that you are too boring. The listeners will reject you by turning the channel, and if a remote isn't present, they'll just pick up their phones. I hosted a family birthday dinner in honor of my 20-year-old niece recently. Two times during the dinner conversation, at the table, the guest of honor used her hand-held device. BUT SO DID HER MOTHER. It's no longer valid to blame this solely on the young.

I've gone on too long already? Gotta go!

Have you noticed the state of cinema lately? Almost everything is a remake of a remake and every other film is a superhero movie. Can a greta garbo exist today? Not likely. Can a Chinatown or 2001 a space odyssey be made today? Never.
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Old 07-10-2013, 12:52 AM
 
Location: SW FL
864 posts, read 1,501,418 times
Reputation: 866
Quote:
Originally Posted by rishi851 View Post
Have you noticed the state of cinema lately? Almost everything is a remake of a remake and every other film is a superhero movie. Can a greta garbo exist today? Not likely. Can a Chinatown or 2001 a space odyssey be made today? Never.
Absolutely spot on.
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Old 07-10-2013, 08:46 AM
 
5,857 posts, read 5,528,125 times
Reputation: 6852
Quote:
It all started with me remarking to my mom how incredibly boring and under stimulating it must have been growing up on a small farm in a small rural community in Illinois.
Actually, it's incredibly interesting, stimulating, challenging, educating, liberating, etc., etc., etc. to be raised in a true rural area, allowing for free space (and friends) to roam, explore and do your thing unmanaged. Being able to contemplate (natural) world and your mind - priceless.

Modern children remind me little inmates, they are bused everywhere, uniformed, permanently managed by the "professionals", robbed of childhood (and humanity) in so many ways, electronic buzz, emphasis on the cramming abstract info-garbage that passes for "education", and wide spread use of the mind-altering drugs by "educators" just top all those indignities off.

But if we look at the sad direction of the human social evolution your generation just fits the pattern. We older generations did our share of the regress too. From hunter gatherers (generalists, living in the natural worlds and communities, free of rigid hierarchies and economic exploitations by the "elites" for the sake of the elites) we "progress" to an impersonal disconnected society of the specialists held together by hundreds of thousands of laws and regulations & survival/status anxiety, we earn our right to exist by developing specialized skills (and compliant personalities) elites demand at this particular time. It's only "logical" for a specialist to give up more and more of his human autonomy in order to become a better specialist, in order to earn his right to exist. We don't grow our food, we don't build our shelter, we... don't do pretty much anything of value to us as human beings, why should we entertain ourselves if there are professionals out there who could do it more "efficiently" for us?

We do our narrow specialized tasks and become consumers of everything else, including entertainment and simple human companionship. New media allows (and it's just beginning) elites to centrally program our minds, views and behavior. World becomes incredibly uniform, boring and anxious.
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Old 07-10-2013, 09:26 AM
 
13,510 posts, read 15,378,809 times
Reputation: 37885
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rcsligar View Post
I had a very intriguing discussion with my mother the other day about young people's expectations and behavior today vs young people's expectations/behavior when my mom was growing up. It didn't take much time to drill down to one concrete difference between these two lifestyles....
It sounds like your mother is from an older generation than the parents of today's young people. The fact that she did not expect to be entertained means she is a living fossil (like myself). or was raised in a cultural time warp.

Quite frankly, I find that many teenagers and people in their early twenties are indeed entertainment and gadget addicted zombies; however, many of their parents seem just as totally brain dead. Their gushy, icky-wicky-sticky adolescent-acting parents with their own past manias for VCR's, abysmally mindless TV sitcoms, New Age brain rot, and totally talentless entertainers manufactured by technical manipulation, etc. simply moved on down the road, and are now right there in the quagmire of the peek-n-peck culture with their spawn.

It was inevitable before the first cell phone was ever invented that this would be the case. So many of today's parents were already moulded to be unquestioning consumers (of anything) and mindless rabble and cannon fodder when needed by their political and financial betters. What would they give birth to and raise -- surely not a race of saints and scholars?
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Old 07-10-2013, 09:42 AM
 
13,510 posts, read 15,378,809 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RememberMee View Post
Actually, it's incredibly interesting, stimulating, challenging, educating, liberating, etc., etc., etc. to be raised in a true rural area, allowing for free space (and friends) to roam, explore and do your thing unmanaged. Being able to contemplate (natural) world and your mind - priceless. ....
Indeed, it is. And the total disconnect from the natural world and the ability to discover the living world on your own is one of the greatest wrong turns taken by societies and cultures all over the world, not just our own. And you did not need to be a farm kid to have this experience widely available.

Visits to the zoo and the aquariums don't make up for it. Hiking for two weeks every year in a National Park with a backpack the contents of which would support the inhabitants of a small village is not a substitute. Nor are EcoTours.

Perhaps the very worst part of the change is that if you have not had this type of experience available to you, you cannot even reject it. There is no imprint of connection to the totality of the living world. We become a race of zoo animals...completely detached from much of what our makeup was intended to deal with. We are as neurotically disoriented as five generation of tigers raised in zoos or three generations of elephants born in circuses.
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