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Old 02-11-2008, 04:15 PM
 
Location: State of Being
35,883 posts, read 70,174,693 times
Reputation: 22577

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Quote:
Originally Posted by SunnyKayak View Post
ANI, if you dont mind me asking is a tornado warning in the midwest more precise than it is here?

Does the terrain here make them seem more scary since you cannot see them developing in the distance with the hilly terrain, and amount of trees?
Yes - tornado warnings where I was were really precise. We typically had at least 10 - 12 minutes to gather ourselves and get to the basement once the sirens went off. I think the shortest time we had was 8 minutes and that was a small tornado that went over our house - didn't touch down in our neighborhood.

As far as seeing them - it was important to watch the cloud bank forming as this would give everyone an awareness about the likelihood of tornadoes b/f the sirens would go off. Plus we kept our TV on when under tornado warning. I can't see a thing here - the trees are so thick in our neighborhood - can't see a block off - plus - here, the clouds are not visible in a cloud bank formation. I was witness to a tornado in Nashville, TN a few years back and the reason I knew something bad was coming - was b/c of the swirling motion in the clouds, not a cloud bank.

My first week in Kansas, the sirens went off while I was mopping the kitchen and I had no clue what that even meant. LOL. After the mini-blinds on the windows started clattering so loudly upstairs (had been airing out the house) and I ran upstairs to see what was going on - and then I saw shingles flying around outside - it occurred to me - this reminded me of Hurricane Hugo so I started worrying what the heck was going on. I know - how ignorant but no one had told me what the sirens were for and I was from NC where - as you know - there just aren't sirens. I thought it was a fire siren going off.

Luckily, my neighbor had given me her phone number so I called her to ask what was going on w/ the sirens. She yelled in the phone - "WHERE ARE YOU?" I said - upstairs - and she said "Take your phone and get to the basement NOW."

I soon learned.
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Old 02-11-2008, 04:32 PM
 
Location: The 12th State
22,974 posts, read 60,748,857 times
Reputation: 15002
Quote:
Originally Posted by anifani821 View Post
Yes - tornado warnings where I was were really precise. We typically had at least 10 - 12 minutes to gather ourselves and get to the basement once the sirens went off. I think the shortest time we had was 8 minutes and that was a small tornado that went over our house - didn't touch down in our neighborhood.

As far as seeing them - it was important to watch the cloud bank forming as this would give everyone an awareness about the likelihood of tornadoes b/f the sirens would go off. Plus we kept our TV on when under tornado warning. I can't see a thing here - the trees are so thick in our neighborhood - can't see a block off - plus - here, the clouds are not visible in a cloud bank formation. I was witness to a tornado in Nashville, TN a few years back and the reason I knew something bad was coming - was b/c of the swirling motion in the clouds, not a cloud bank.

My first week in Kansas, the sirens went off while I was mopping the kitchen and I had no clue what that even meant. LOL. After the mini-blinds on the windows started clattering so loudly upstairs (had been airing out the house) and I ran upstairs to see what was going on - and then I saw shingles flying around outside - it occurred to me - this reminded me of Hurricane Hugo so I started worrying what the heck was going on. I know - how ignorant but no one had told me what the sirens were for and I was from NC where - as you know - there just aren't sirens. I thought it was a fire siren going off.

Luckily, my neighbor had given me her phone number so I called her to ask what was going on w/ the sirens. She yelled in the phone - "WHERE ARE YOU?" I said - upstairs - and she said "Take your phone and get to the basement NOW."

I soon learned.
Did your floor look clean after it was aired dried by nature?

just kidding on this serious subject
Thanks for sharing anifan821, and Mrs. Steel. I watch those tornado chase shows and I find those fascinating as they track one. Where here they use doppler and can show you neighborhoods it heading. I remember I was working over night in a restaurant and they just stated Tornado warning Lexington and I was thinking that doesnt help me lol it dark I cant see this place has to many windows and I dont feel safe in a big open box lol. I am glad this state does not have that many but this area can put out some scary lightening.
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Old 02-11-2008, 04:44 PM
 
Location: State of Being
35,883 posts, read 70,174,693 times
Reputation: 22577
Quote:
Originally Posted by SunnyKayak View Post
Did your floor look clean after it was aired dried by nature?

just kidding on this serious subject
Thanks for sharing anifan821, and Mrs. Steel. I watch those tornado chase shows and I find those fascinating as they track one. Where here they use doppler and can show you neighborhoods it heading. I remember I was working over night in a restaurant and they just stated Tornado warning Lexington and I was thinking that doesnt help me lol it dark I cant see this place has to many windows and I dont feel safe in a big open box lol. I am glad this state does not have that many but this area can put out some scary lightening.
Hee Hee - well actually, Sunny, I didn't tell the whole story b/c I am always so long-winded.

When I was downstairs and heard the siren going off, it had already started hailing. Since I thought it was a fire siren, I thought - that is so weird - if it is hailing like that - so wet - how could a fire have started? So I opened the door to see out - you know - like to see if there were smoke somewhere nearby. Well, when I did, the hail was coming in at an angle, and the winds were awful - and the hail blew in the door and went all the way across the kitchen to the other wall. I had never seen anything like that. That was when I was hearing all the clattering upstairs and ran up there to see what was going on and found my mini-blinds waving at nearly a 90 degree angle.

Even w/ all this wind, it had not dawned on me that a tornado was on the way, LOL. I had never heard that typically, hail precedes a tornado (in the midwest, anyway).

So when all this was over, instead of nice clean floors, I had big wet spots all over the floor where the hail had melted. I had to mop all over again.

If you watch radar - you will learn to spot an bow echo formation, wh/ can indicate formation of a tornado. Here in NC, when we are under tornado warning, my eye is glued to the radar, both on tv and on my laptop.
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Old 04-01-2018, 07:15 AM
 
29 posts, read 16,137 times
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According to the National weather page wayne, pitt and greene counties are at a higher risk than other areas of NC for tornado.
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Old 04-01-2018, 08:34 AM
 
Location: Research Triangle Area, NC
4,943 posts, read 3,497,709 times
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Cool. Thanks for digging up a 10 year old thread for that bit of information.....
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Old 04-06-2018, 07:31 AM
 
3 posts, read 1,202 times
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Im gonna post this on two different threads so I apologize if people see it twice... but ive lived and traveled all over NC but specifically in the mountains. I was born and raised in Ashe county which is near boone and use to pride myself on fact ashe county had NEVER had a tornado! We dont deal with major earthquakes just some mildly rough winters and no jobs🤷*♀️ But you have to make tradeoff somewhere! Then it was THIS YEAR! THIS YEAR! Ashe had its first tornado! For a community thats ran as a firont page news story about the lunch ladys at the high s chook (we rarely have REAL news) this tornado was a BIG deal! Every county around us has had tornados before and 45 minutes away they dealt with them enough they were use to flatten school gyms and homes aall thentime!
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Old 04-06-2018, 02:53 PM
 
6,800 posts, read 5,523,377 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dkamplain View Post
Im gonna post this on two different threads so I apologize if people see it twice... but ive lived and traveled all over NC but specifically in the mountains. I was born and raised in Ashe county which is near boone and use to pride myself on fact ashe county had NEVER had a tornado! We dont deal with major earthquakes just some mildly rough winters and no jobs��*♀️ But you have to make tradeoff somewhere! Then it was THIS YEAR! THIS YEAR! Ashe had its first tornado! For a community thats ran as a firont page news story about the lunch ladys at the high s chook (we rarely have REAL news) this tornado was a BIG deal! Every county around us has had tornados before and 45 minutes away they dealt with them enough they were use to flatten school gyms and homes aall thentime!
Actually, it was last year. And it wasn't the first one ever in Ashe County:

Moderator cut: link removed, linking to competitor sites is not allowed

Last edited by Yac; 04-19-2018 at 06:41 AM..
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Old 04-07-2018, 10:39 AM
LLN
 
Location: Upstairs closet
5,186 posts, read 9,408,820 times
Reputation: 6890
When I lived (and worked) in Des Moines, we had lots of sirens.

I had a corner office in a multi-story building. All day long we were keeping an eye on a front coming across Nebraska and western Iowa.

The sky got more and more ominous. At some point I checked out one window, and the clouds were moving in one direction. Looking out the window on the other side of the building, the clouds were moving differently.

I headed to the basement, hollering for everyone to evacuate to the basement.
We hadn’t reached the stairs, when the alarms started going off. We had a touchdown of a small tornado, just a couple hundred yards away.

Way to close for comfort, but you learn early, you don’t mess with that stuff.
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