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Old 05-13-2008, 12:36 PM
 
71 posts, read 277,484 times
Reputation: 89

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The reason most states don't have vehicle safety inspections is because a lot of recent research shows they don't do anything. Safety inspections are one of the classic government boondoggle programs, their purpose being collect taxes, give mechanics the opportunity to sell repairs, make it harder for private individuals to buy and sell their own cars to the car dealers profit, make money for vendors of safety inspection equipment, and keep a firmly entrenched bureucracy employed. They are so hard to get rid of because so many special interest groups keep them going with pressure on the legislature, in some cases legislators are car dealers. Don't want to lose their meal tickets. Ronald Reagan had it right when he said "The closest thing to immortality on this earth is a government program." Fortunantly only 18 States still have them, 3 States have bills to repeal them at present, but sorry, North Carolina isn't one of them.
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Old 08-02-2008, 08:28 AM
 
Location: Fuquay Varina NC
3 posts, read 16,575 times
Reputation: 11
Smile crack headlite

Quote:
Originally Posted by RDSLOTS View Post
In theory, I think I understand the requirement to have an automobile inspected annually. But, if this is such a great idea, why isn't it required nationwide? I guess I am just disgruntled with the 'system' (my husband calls it a hidden tax) because I am running into some trouble getting my car inspected.

One of the front headlamps is cracked; has been for a good number of years, but the lamp works perfectly. It has been through rain, snow, puddles, left on inadvertently until the battery died, but works perfectly. I cannot get it to pass inspection here because it is cracked.

It is NOT as simple as just replacing the headlamp. The whole front bumper has to come off, and is evidently a little more labor-intensive than what it appears. The best estimate to change the lamp has been about $200.

In the meanwhile, I have an expired inspection sticker and run the risk of getting a ticket. I may be having to drive the car back to Wilmington to find someone to do it? And how fair/legal is that? Because I may be able to find someone to ignore the fact the lamp is broken but STILL works?

Now, what's that all about?
well let me tell you something,I was and auto Inspector,for 25 years in Raleigh,and you dont have to replace the headlite,just go a parts store a pick up a small tube of clear silcone,thats all you need to do.just make should that water doen't get inside.
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Old 08-02-2008, 12:11 PM
 
16,308 posts, read 26,134,921 times
Reputation: 8324
Quote:
Originally Posted by deddy49 View Post
well let me tell you something,I was and auto Inspector,for 25 years in Raleigh,and you dont have to replace the headlite,just go a parts store a pick up a small tube of clear silcone,thats all you need to do.just make should that water doen't get inside.
That may work for honest facilities, but many people are taken for a ride by shall we say, less than honest shops, that really don't make squat doing inspections, but it allows them to leverage unnecessary but profitable repairs.

As other states abandon inspections as their effectiveness is almost zero, and they recognize that it is an undue burden on the public, NC is becoming Orwellian as they use it as a revenue stream.
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Old 08-04-2008, 10:35 AM
 
Location: Newport, NC
956 posts, read 3,764,403 times
Reputation: 708
NC doesn't sound too bad compared to PA. The inspection here is about $20, the emissions test is about $30. You have to have stickers on your windshield showing each has been done. Must be inspected every year. Cost of repairs are above and beyond cost to inspect and test. And there are minimum emission standards you must meet or pay for.
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Old 08-04-2008, 10:44 AM
 
Location: Blue Ridge Mtns of NC
5,661 posts, read 25,378,914 times
Reputation: 3844
Repair Waivers

A repair waiver can be issued when a vehicle cannot pass an emission inspection but the owner has made the attempt in correcting the emission failure. The following are the basic steps that need to be followed in order to be eligible for a repair waiver. The "OBDII Failure Brochure" which describes the repair waiver in more detail can be provided to you upon request from your inspection facility.

1. Vehicle fails the emissions inspection test, that is, fails the analysis of data provided by the On-Board Diagnostic (OBDII) equipment, but has passed the visual and safety portion of the inspection.

2. The vehicle owner takes vehicle in for repairs and the repair facility provides a repair receipt listing the OBDII trouble codes that resulted in the emission inspection failure, itemizing the repairs costing at least $200.00 made to the vehicle to correct the OBDII failure.

3. The vehicle owner must take the vehicle that failed the emission inspection, the two failed emission inspection records (VIRS), and the original repair receipts to the local DMV office.

4. DMV will review all documentation and inspect the vehicle for the repairs before a waiver can be issued.
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Old 08-04-2008, 01:01 PM
 
16,308 posts, read 26,134,921 times
Reputation: 8324
Quote:
Originally Posted by mm34b View Post
Repair Waivers

A repair waiver can be issued when a vehicle cannot pass an emission inspection but the owner has made the attempt in correcting the emission failure. The following are the basic steps that need to be followed in order to be eligible for a repair waiver. The "OBDII Failure Brochure" which describes the repair waiver in more detail can be provided to you upon request from your inspection facility.

1. Vehicle fails the emissions inspection test, that is, fails the analysis of data provided by the On-Board Diagnostic (OBDII) equipment, but has passed the visual and safety portion of the inspection.

2. The vehicle owner takes vehicle in for repairs and the repair facility provides a repair receipt listing the OBDII trouble codes that resulted in the emission inspection failure, itemizing the repairs costing at least $200.00 made to the vehicle to correct the OBDII failure.

3. The vehicle owner must take the vehicle that failed the emission inspection, the two failed emission inspection records (VIRS), and the original repair receipts to the local DMV office.

4. DMV will review all documentation and inspect the vehicle for the repairs before a waiver can be issued.
Which is a sub-paragraph of this topic.

"How do I get a waiver?
Waivers are available for vehicles unable to pass an emissions inspection test and are granted by authorized DMV personnel. A vehicle receiving a waiver is exempted from meeting the full requirements of the emissions test portion of the inspection for one year."

Which means you have to spend days jumping through the same hoops next year. Is there any requirement that this MUST be disclosed to anyone you sell/trade the vehicle to?
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Old 01-28-2010, 02:12 PM
 
1 posts, read 3,278 times
Reputation: 10
Default Past due auto inspection

So I had my truck inspected on the last day i was legal allowed to do so, but I failed some safety things such as broken driver side mirror, windshield wipers worked only intermittently and my horn didn't work. So i had 90 days to get everything straightened out. I made all the corrections with in several days but just got to busy with school and work that i forgot about going back to retest. My inspection was due in Aug 2009 and now its Feb 1, 2010. How much are the fees gonna cost me to make everything right? Tags past due as well due to the inspection thing. No ticket so far!
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Old 01-28-2010, 06:16 PM
 
Location: The 12th State
22,974 posts, read 60,708,294 times
Reputation: 15002
it wont cost you anything more unless you get pulled over for expire tags then the cop will make u parked the car take you to jail probably let you out but you now could have court fees towing & storage fees. Get this done tomorrow ASAP. And expect a letter from the DMV.
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