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Old 05-24-2013, 07:47 PM
 
16 posts, read 29,387 times
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Growing up in Upstate New York, I've often heard people using "sir" or "ma'am". I often heard it from people who seemed to be required to be polite to others, such as clerks in stores. As a result, I wondered whether it did have elements of a subordinate addressing a superior, and that service employees essentially are a rank below most other citizens.

On the other hand, I've often been called "sir" by strangers addressing me, often older ones. Perhaps considering that, it's simply a measure of respect for strangers, putting your best foot forward. As such, I have taken to doing so as well, addressing store clerks in such a way; I find it's a small gesture, but it helps show respect, and it has been positively received when I have done it.
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Old 06-12-2013, 04:27 AM
 
2 posts, read 5,972 times
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My father was from West Virginia and went into the military, and we were taught to say Ma'am or Sir, and Mrs. or Mr. out of respect, whether it was age, rank or politeness. And it has never failed me. I grew up in El Paso, Tx and I still prefer to be referred to as "too polite," rather than rude. I still call my elders and even professional people my same age by "appropriate" titles, Your Honor, Dr., etc., until I'm instructed by them to call them something else, including generals in the Air Force and Ph.Ds, both of whom I have worked. And Tenne, I am 56 yrs old and have a graduate degree and have taught my son to say Ma'am or Sir, Mrs. or Mr. If I were not so polite, I would ask you "Would you like honey with that or a saucer of vinegar?" Get over your stereotypical self, HON.
But 124C41, when my son was in high school in the mid-90s and we went to his high school football games, (Yes Tenne, we still watch our daughters and sons play sports, including dance, etc.)every time a student passed in front of us, he or she said "Excuse me" but the adults never did. Require more of parents and teachers, the kids will get it, and I was a teacher. Thanks Inquest for your polite inquiry.
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Old 08-28-2013, 10:21 PM
 
1 posts, read 4,971 times
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When I was a high school student in PA volunteering as a library assistant, one of my duties was to take around attendance sheets to the study hall teachers. Once I thanked one of the teachers for signing and returning the sheet with, "Thank you, sir." He answered me with a don't-call-me-sir-I-work-for-a-living quip. The attendees in his study hall laughed, but I had no respect for him after that.
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Old 08-29-2013, 05:59 AM
 
1,111 posts, read 1,769,181 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Emma Peel View Post
When I was a high school student in PA volunteering as a library assistant, one of my duties was to take around attendance sheets to the study hall teachers. Once I thanked one of the teachers for signing and returning the sheet with, "Thank you, sir." He answered me with a don't-call-me-sir-I-work-for-a-living quip. The attendees in his study hall laughed, but I had no respect for him after that.
Funny you said that because a lot of people get offended when you address them as sir or ma'am! I was raised to say yes sir no, no sir or yes ma'am, no ma'am, but after a supervisor of mine at a job I worked at five years ago told me not to call him sir (thankfully he wasn't rude about it) I just stopped addressing people as sir or ma'am, the only people I address as sir or ma'am now are my dad and mom!
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Old 09-07-2013, 11:26 PM
 
102 posts, read 132,853 times
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ITS CORNY. Dont do it just to be a follower. Stay yourself. Someone with a well rounded personality backbone self esteem and charm. You know.. a real person. Don't know if you are, but northerners have way more well rounded personalities than a "ma'am" talking southerner. They're a lot more fun. Plus anybody who talks like a servant doesn't have any personality.

Dont turn into some weirdo robot talking moron with no spirit. People over 25 (all older people) who say yes ma'am and sir to each other always freaked me out. Even if I saw it on TV. Looks wussy and weird. Like you're waay too overly obediant for no reason at all. Just be you. If its too creepy to say with people the same age when you're young it's still creepy later on when yr a little older. No different. The only people who dont look weird saying it are people under other people's authority like soldiers in the military and cops to other cops with higher rank. I dont even call judges and cops ma'am or sir. I give them the title they are. Your honor and officer. That's a lot more respectful than some servant sounding country hillbilly line.

Theres no way I'd hang with any creepy ppl who use that. Definitely not my kind of ppl. They're like the goodie goodies. BORINGG. I'm only cool with people full of life and originality just someone who's themself not something someone told them to be. You know the sexy people. Not the cornballs.

Plus those people are so worried about being overly polite and respectful to people they don't even know, with one corny word, instead of just using their actions. Just be respectful and not disrespectful (shrug) how hard is that. Now that's normal. So they just made sure they gave a whole lot of respect to some pedophile or murderer. How do you know you didn't. You have to earn respect not just get it for no reason. Just be normal and not disrespectful that other stuff is a55backwards and not that bright. Trust me you'll have way more friends too. Those people are homely and lonely.

Pretty much. A few of them might actually have a huge social life. I doubt it.

Last edited by L3XX; 09-07-2013 at 11:39 PM..
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Old 09-08-2013, 06:06 PM
 
102 posts, read 132,853 times
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See.. the rest of the cool mofos out there agree. Just got 5 reps for that post
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Old 09-08-2013, 08:20 PM
 
Location: NC High Country
4,077 posts, read 7,326,506 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by L3XX View Post
See.. the rest of the cool mofos out there agree. Just got 5 reps for that post
You sure didn't get one from me.

Using sir or ma'am is in no way being a follower or corny.... as many posters have confirmed, it's a simple matter of showing respect for others.
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Old 09-15-2013, 06:51 PM
 
102 posts, read 132,853 times
Reputation: 177
Quote:
Originally Posted by roadpony View Post
You sure didn't get one from me.

Using sir or ma'am is in no way being a follower or corny.... as many posters have confirmed, it's a simple matter of showing respect for others.

duh.. I said COOl mofos

and I already let you all in on why that whole "im being obediant and respectful" to all new people I run into, instead of friendly, open, laid back and normal is bull not to mention lame. I dont know... unless you weirdos who say that and actually have friends, say it to them too - wouldn't be surprised if you did. Weird is weird. I rather someone show me a crazy wild personality from day 1 then put me to sleep straight off the bat with "yes sir/ma'am". You're just some weirdo probably from some bible thumping or boring miltary upbringing who can't hang. The fun people in life will actualy have more respect for someone who shows them their wild side (if yr lucky enough to have one), then that. The last thing I have for anyone who says that is respect. Trust me I run all over those types. Shows weakness and brain numbing boredom.

This is exactly what someone is thinking of you when you run into people who dont like it. (laughing) Definitely not thinking ahh thank god this person the same age as me is soooo respectful I want more.... Trust me you've been crossed off the list. Not to "get to know". And if you're lucky.. they won't clown you like I will.

Now u Know
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Old 09-17-2013, 02:28 PM
 
Location: Mesa, AZ
451 posts, read 681,991 times
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Being born and raised in Arizona, I've always appreciated being called ma'am, although it doesn't happen often. I was raised that, as a child, adults you didn't know were to be addressed as sir or ma'am. Working in any kind of customer service job (restaurant, retail, call center), I called people sir or ma'am because it seemed courteous and professional to do so. I don't understand why people get offended by these polite terms.

I will say, though, that I absolutely HATE when strangers call me hon, sweetie, dear, etc. Addressing a stranger by a term of endearment is patronizing and rude.
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Old 09-17-2013, 02:37 PM
 
Location: NC High Country
4,077 posts, read 7,326,506 times
Reputation: 4136
Quote:
Originally Posted by ThatCrazyRedhead View Post
... I called people sir or ma'am because it seemed courteous and professional to do so. I don't understand why people get offended by these polite terms.

I will say, though, that I absolutely HATE when strangers call me hon, sweetie, dear, etc. Addressing a stranger by a term of endearment is patronizing and rude.
I agree 100%. Now that I am considered a senior citizen, I mentally cringe when someone young enough to be my grandchild calls me hon, sweetie, etc. I generally suck it up since I realize they think they're being friendly.
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