U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Covid-19 Information Page
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > North Carolina
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 03-12-2018, 11:13 AM
 
728 posts, read 580,870 times
Reputation: 852

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by BrianGC View Post
Nope, definitely doesn't exist on the east coast unless you're in the higher elevations (Maybe Boone for example). Although winters here are usually mild, but summers still get very hot and humid, just for a shorter time period than say Florida.
IMO Asheville is better than Boone for year round. But coming from the Midwest, Boone winters ain't nothing.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 03-12-2018, 08:41 PM
 
6,540 posts, read 10,683,131 times
Reputation: 5083
Quote:
Originally Posted by BC1960 View Post
Not in the summer!
That's why I stated most months of the year. With the exception of July and August the other 10 months are extremely comfortable along the I-20 corridor. In NC, July/August/January/February are all uncomfortable (with the exception of this past February which was a freak of nature).

The I-10 corridor is too hot, I-40 is too cold. I-20 is the best balance of hot/cold. It's no surprise that the largest non-coastal metro in the east is on I-20 (Atlanta). The second largest metro in the east without a nearby major water feature is only 80 miles north of I-20 (Charlotte).

IMO, the "Goldilocks zone" in the east is as far south as Charleston and as far north as Charlotte. Atlanta/Columbia are at the center of that climate zone.

Last edited by urbancharlotte; 03-12-2018 at 08:49 PM..
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-12-2018, 08:45 PM
 
728 posts, read 580,870 times
Reputation: 852
Quote:
Originally Posted by urbancharlotte View Post
That's why I stated most months of the year. With the exception of July and August the other 10 months are extremely comfortable along the I-20 corridor. In NC, July/August/January/February are all uncomfortable (with the exception of this past February which was a freak of nature).

The I-10 corridor is too hot, I-40 is too cold. I-20 is the best balance of hot/cold. It's no surprise that the largest non-coastal metro in the east is on I-20 (Atlanta).
Lotz. The rest of the nation calls it Hotlanta.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-12-2018, 09:02 PM
 
6,540 posts, read 10,683,131 times
Reputation: 5083
Quote:
Originally Posted by Clever nickname here View Post
Lotz. The rest of the nation calls it Hotlanta.
Atlanta is hot, but it isn't the hell-on-Earth that is Houston. Also, most people are just fine with heat over the cold. LA, Miami, New Orleans, Houston, Tampa, Orlando, San Antonio, Austin, Phoenix and several others are easily above 90 degrees 3-4 months each year. The same can be said about NC some years. So the real question is which area has the best balance of hot/cold? IMO, I-20 is by far the most comfortable corridor year-round in the east. There are only 2 uncomfortable months along I-20, which is as good as it gets on the east coast.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-13-2018, 07:12 AM
 
7,339 posts, read 4,567,750 times
Reputation: 9842
Quote:
Originally Posted by urbancharlotte View Post
Atlanta is hot, but it isn't the hell-on-Earth that is Houston.
I think it helps that Atlanta is 1,000 feet above sea level and not right next to a large body of water, where as Houston is basically at sea level and pretty close to the Gulf.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-13-2018, 10:14 AM
 
598 posts, read 359,753 times
Reputation: 847
Quote:
Originally Posted by Clever nickname here View Post
Lotz. The rest of the nation calls it Hotlanta.
I am actually a Raleigh native that is currently living in Atlanta. Believe when I say the summer heat here in Atlanta feels exactly the same as Raleigh. I really don't notice a difference at all. The winter time is noticeably a few degrees warmer with less snow and ice than Raleigh. So I would say it has a little bit more balance when it comes to temperatures but its not a big difference.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-13-2018, 12:35 PM
 
Location: Winston-Salem, NC
1,266 posts, read 2,291,026 times
Reputation: 675
I've lived in NY (NYC suburbs); CA (San Diego); NV (Mesquite); UT (St. George area); OR (Portland area); now Greenville, outside of Raleigh, and currently outside of Winston-Salem. With the exception of San Diego and its near-perfect (some might actually say boring) climate, the Triad's climate has been my favorite.

Greenville NC was our first experience in the South and its humidity - that definitely took some getting used to. I like a little bit of snow...this past winter has been perfect for me. I don't like extreme cold or extreme heat. I love the thunderstorms, and appreciate being at low risk of hurricanes. I love a change of seasons. I wish our springs were a little longer.

I didn't like the winters or the summers in NY. NV and southern UT were too brown, dry, and hot much of the year. OR was too gray, drizzly and dreary for most of the year.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-13-2018, 04:00 PM
 
6,800 posts, read 5,503,501 times
Reputation: 5345
Quote:
Originally Posted by urbancharlotte View Post
That's why I stated most months of the year. With the exception of July and August the other 10 months are extremely comfortable along the I-20 corridor. In NC, July/August/January/February are all uncomfortable (with the exception of this past February which was a freak of nature).
Wilmington has the same average temps in January and February as Columbia, so I don't see any difference.

Quote:
Originally Posted by urbancharlotte View Post
The I-10 corridor is too hot, I-40 is too cold. I-20 is the best balance of hot/cold.
Hwy. corridors aren't the best geography to use for this sort of thing. I-40 can be in the far SE corner of the state at the beach, or 4,000 feet above sea level in the mountains.

Quote:
Originally Posted by urbancharlotte View Post
It's no surprise that the largest non-coastal metro in the east is on I-20 (Atlanta). The second largest metro in the east without a nearby major water feature is only 80 miles north of I-20 (Charlotte).
Except that interstates were routed to go through urban areas that had already been prominent for a hundred years or more. The weather isn't a factor, except for lack of long winters like the northeast and upper midwest have. Atlanta grew because it was a railroad hub, then an airplane hub.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-13-2018, 04:53 PM
 
3,375 posts, read 5,529,922 times
Reputation: 2440
Halfback is a term for a reason

More Retirees Find the Mid-South an Alternative to Florida - The New York Times

NC in Focus: Examining “halfback” trends | Carolina Demography
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-14-2018, 06:11 PM
 
Location: Raleigh, NC
10,519 posts, read 20,560,500 times
Reputation: 11594
Quote:
Originally Posted by hey_guy View Post
Would you say we have the perfect balance of warm and cool weather?
If "we" means the whole state, no.

First of all, there is no "one" climate for the state--the mountains have a much duifferent climate than the coast or the flatlands. Any gardener can tell you about the frost lines etc and they differe from east to west.

As far as cities--I remember once seeing a ranking of the "best" climates in the US; San Francisco and San Diego were at the top, but the highest one in NC was Asheville. Probably because its summers don't get as brutal as points farther east, but the winters, while colder than the rest of the state due to elevation, are also considered moderate by "winter" standards.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply

Quick Reply
Message:




Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > North Carolina
Similar Threads

All times are GMT -6.

© 2005-2021, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Contact Us - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35, 36, 37 - Top