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Old 03-21-2018, 06:22 AM
 
Location: North Carolina
2,679 posts, read 2,872,624 times
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Old 03-21-2018, 07:37 AM
 
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In other news, water is wet
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Old 03-21-2018, 09:33 AM
 
Location: North Carolina
2,679 posts, read 2,872,624 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hey_guy View Post
In other news, water is wet
Yeah... this is a problem, however.
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Old 03-21-2018, 02:04 PM
 
Location: North Carolina
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There is definitely an abuse problem across the state and nation that isn't confined to poor, rural areas.

Part of the explanation is that in the poorer, rural counties a larger proportion of people work in hard, manual labor jobs where they're likely to either be injured or have aches and pains over the long term and be prescribed an opioid. Plus the opioid manufacturers have heavily marketed opioids towards that clientele for years and are just now beginning to be held accountable for doing so.
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Old 03-23-2018, 02:56 PM
 
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Sucks that this is the way it is for most states. Rural communities can't catch a break.
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Old 03-25-2018, 07:07 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jowel View Post
There is definitely an abuse problem across the state and nation that isn't confined to poor, rural areas.

Part of the explanation is that in the poorer, rural counties a larger proportion of people work in hard, manual labor jobs where they're likely to either be injured or have aches and pains over the long term and be prescribed an opioid. Plus the opioid manufacturers have heavily marketed opioids towards that clientele for years and are just now beginning to be held accountable for doing so.
I feel similar to this also it's probably a case of similar numbers in all the other counties but a larger pool

Opoid abuse hits people on the lower end of the SES. These counties don't have a larger pool of people not lower SES so the numbers are scewed

On sheer numbers wake county would have a bigger problem than robeson
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