Welcome to City-Data.com Forum!
U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > North Carolina
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 04-03-2023, 03:57 PM
 
4,605 posts, read 6,429,984 times
Reputation: 4198
Some things that jump out to me: 1) Franklin County is on fire with growth, up by nearly 5,000 people since 2000. This rate of growth is relatively new, as the county previously was growing only modestly; 2) Johnson County continues to grow at a breakneck pace and the growth is on track to spill east toward the I-95 corridor where new development is sprouting; 3) Lee County's growth rate is respectfully around 2.3% annually, but a lot of new industry is locating there already, and nearby Vinfast could make the population go boom in a couple of years; 4) Chatham County grew at a year over year rate of about 1%, which is respectable, but not quite the red hot rate that will likely follow when Wolfspeed is operational and Chatham Park is more substantially complete; 5) After 2010, Rockingham County's population stagnated or declined. 2022 is the highest estimated population for the county since 2012; 6) Could Nash County be reversing a population skid that began around 2010? The county gained over 500 people in the latest YTD estimate; 7) Alamance County's 1.4% growth rate is the highest rate in the Triad, followed by Davidson County's 1.1% growth rate; 8) Currituck County continues its explosive growth rate at 4.4%; 9) it looks like the Durham County slowdown in population growth is real; and 10) like Franklin County, Lincoln County is an exurban county that previously had modest growth, but is now experiencing red hot growth at around a 3.5% annual growth rate.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 04-03-2023, 04:21 PM
 
743 posts, read 826,419 times
Reputation: 345
Lincoln is not really a exurban county, at least not where the majority of population is growing. The eastern part of the county is a extension of Lake Norman & better priced at this time.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-03-2023, 04:35 PM
 
4,605 posts, read 6,429,984 times
Reputation: 4198
Quote:
Originally Posted by js4life View Post
Lincoln is not really a exurban county, at least not where the majority of population is growing. The eastern part of the county is a extension of Lake Norman & better priced at this time.
I consider it exurban. The county overall is not particularly dense. It ranges from quasi-suburban to small town rural to me.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-03-2023, 04:45 PM
 
743 posts, read 826,419 times
Reputation: 345
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tarheelhombre View Post
I consider it exurban. The county overall is not particularly dense. It ranges from quasi-suburban to small town rural to me.
That's true but the same could be said of parts of Union & Iredell counties. This area likely sees a huge boom over the next couple of decades with planned road improvements, growth in eastern Gaston & close proximity to the airport/River District which has potential to have a Balantyne type effect on the west side
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-03-2023, 07:04 PM
 
Location: Atlanta
3,661 posts, read 3,940,346 times
Reputation: 4321
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tarheelhombre View Post
Some things that jump out to me: 1) Franklin County is on fire with growth, up by nearly 5,000 people since 2000. This rate of growth is relatively new, as the county previously was growing only modestly; 2) Johnson County continues to grow at a breakneck pace and the growth is on track to spill east toward the I-95 corridor where new development is sprouting; 3) Lee County's growth rate is respectfully around 2.3% annually, but a lot of new industry is locating there already, and nearby Vinfast could make the population go boom in a couple of years; 4) Chatham County grew at a year over year rate of about 1%, which is respectable, but not quite the red hot rate that will likely follow when Wolfspeed is operational and Chatham Park is more substantially complete; 5) After 2010, Rockingham County's population stagnated or declined. 2022 is the highest estimated population for the county since 2012; 6) Could Nash County be reversing a population skid that began around 2010? The county gained over 500 people in the latest YTD estimate; 7) Alamance County's 1.4% growth rate is the highest rate in the Triad, followed by Davidson County's 1.1% growth rate; 8) Currituck County continues its explosive growth rate at 4.4%; 9) it looks like the Durham County slowdown in population growth is real; and 10) like Franklin County, Lincoln County is an exurban county that previously had modest growth, but is now experiencing red hot growth at around a 3.5% annual growth rate.
For sure Franklin County has been the least similar to the sophistication of the rest of the Triangle.
I've had seatmates on airplanes snicker when I told them I was a native on flights to/from RDU.

But it's large shared border with Wake County has always cemented its inclusion as a core Triangle county.

Even back in the 80s when the population was tabulated in the 700,000s the Triangle was defined as Wake, Durham, Orange and Franklin counties.

It is a different world in Central and Northern Franklin County, and maybe that's a good thing to provide some variety within commuting distance of Raleigh.

Slower growth can yield better results. Providing water and sewer is one of the reasons Franklin isn't growing faster. The county will need to build new and bigger systems and the county tax rate is already higher than Wake. They also rely on getting water from Wake and the Tar River. Several years ago they were contemplating tapping into Kerr Lake however I don't know the details.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-04-2023, 06:51 AM
 
4,605 posts, read 6,429,984 times
Reputation: 4198
Quote:
Originally Posted by architect77 View Post
For sure Franklin County has been the least similar to the sophistication of the rest of the Triangle.
I've had seatmates on airplanes snicker when I told them I was a native on flights to/from RDU.

But it's large shared border with Wake County has always cemented its inclusion as a core Triangle county.

Even back in the 80s when the population was tabulated in the 700,000s the Triangle was defined as Wake, Durham, Orange and Franklin counties.

It is a different world in Central and Northern Franklin County, and maybe that's a good thing to provide some variety within commuting distance of Raleigh.

Slower growth can yield better results. Providing water and sewer is one of the reasons Franklin isn't growing faster. The county will need to build new and bigger systems and the county tax rate is already higher than Wake. They also rely on getting water from Wake and the Tar River. Several years ago they were contemplating tapping into Kerr Lake however I don't know the details.
Naturally, Franklin County's growth is and will be concentrated near the Wake border, and extend northward along U.S. 1. Already, development is being proposed up toward Franklinton along U.S. 1. I really think U.S. 1 should be a freeway through the county.


https://www.bizjournals.com/triangle...new-homes.html

https://www.bizjournals.com/triangle...r-raleigh.html
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-04-2023, 08:20 AM
 
7,076 posts, read 12,350,275 times
Reputation: 6439
Quote:
Originally Posted by rnc2mbfl View Post
On both counts, land area matters to population numbers as Mr BLT states. Raleigh will never be NC's most populated city without some sort of impossible merger among a variety of municipalities in Wake. Currently Raleigh is less than half the land area of Charlotte and I don't think that its largest possible size would even be 2/3 the current land area of Charlotte. There are just too many other municipalities with their own growth agendas in the county. It's not impossible to imagine Wake having Raleigh with 600,000, Cary with 200,000, Apex with over 100,000 and a few others in the 75,000+ range. Going forward, it's also hard to imagine any county overtaking Wake, barring a complete collapse of the economy.

The two most ascendent counties seem to be Union and Johnston with their rapid growth and positions adjacent to the two superstar counties in the state. It will be interesting to watch these two over the next 20 years. Cumberland is a wildcard in my opinion. I don't have a clue what the future holds for that county.
City populations don't really mean much. Most people choose a place to live and/or visit by pretty much every measure except census population data. Furthermore, our current remote working environment could cause the collapse of the CSA/MSA model as we currently know it. What cities need to get back to is creating dense and walkable areas (the core is the perfect place to start) with tons of mass transit and foot traffic. Who cares what's going on in 300 or 900 sq/miles? I'm more interested in what's happening in that tight dense little 20-35 sq/mile area that often finds it's photograph on postcards. Some of the smallest cities in our area (Charleston, Savannah, and Asheville) seem to understand this simple concept.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-04-2023, 09:59 AM
 
3,084 posts, read 4,859,830 times
Reputation: 1954
Quote:
Originally Posted by urbancharlotte View Post
City populations don't really mean much. Most people choose a place to live and/or visit by pretty much every measure except census population data. Furthermore, our current remote working environment could cause the collapse of the CSA/MSA model as we currently know it. What cities need to get back to is creating dense and walkable areas (the core is the perfect place to start) with tons of mass transit and foot traffic. Who cares what's going on in 300 or 900 sq/miles? I'm more interested in what's happening in that tight dense little 20-35 sq/mile area that often finds it's photograph on postcards. Some of the smallest cities in our area (Charleston, Savannah, and Asheville) seem to understand this simple concept.
NC is a professional of suburban sprawl...the change in annexation laws has caused more cities to revise their local zoning classifications and allowances to encourage redevelopment within their existing footprint. Wilmington only sits at about 50 square miles and was recently reported to be 95% built out. However there are projects going on or in the planning stages to redevelop an old theater, a driving range, a car dealership...turning an old roller skating rink into a church. More and more multi-use paths are being built along main corridors. Much of this is new for North Carolina where interstates just open up another area for development.

If a city or town is not allowing more density, they are going to stagnate.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-04-2023, 11:10 AM
 
4,159 posts, read 2,853,098 times
Reputation: 5517
Quote:
Originally Posted by urbancharlotte View Post
I'm more interested in what's happening in that tight dense little 20-35 sq/mile area that often finds it's photograph on postcards. Some of the smallest cities in our area (Charleston, Savannah, and Asheville) seem to understand this simple concept.
But most of the growth in Charleston is happening in the suburbs and Berkeley County. Certainly isn't happening in the peninsula.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-05-2023, 03:30 PM
 
Location: Greensboro
511 posts, read 511,187 times
Reputation: 417
Quote:
Originally Posted by Heel82 View Post
The Triangle just recently lost Harnett County to Fayetteville MSA. I think the 540 loop finishing and Southern Wake becoming the next growth region as Western Wake fills up will inevitably bring Harnett back.

I'd also look at the Burlington MSA. The Triangle just recently passed the Triad for Alamance commuters. While complicated by the MSA splits going on in both CSAs, I'd expect Alamance will grow at being a RTP bedroom community.
How does this work in the inflow workforce? There are a lot more Triad workers traveling into Alamance than there are coming from Triangle counties. Is it solely tied to the outflow workforce?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:



Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > North Carolina

All times are GMT -6.

© 2005-2024, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Contact Us - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35, 36, 37 - Top