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Old 04-12-2007, 06:39 PM
 
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I know you share a national park, but do you share other things, too, like cultures, cooking, slang, etc.? What is the same, and what is different?
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Old 04-13-2007, 01:20 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Scholar View Post
I know you share a national park, but do you share other things, too, like cultures, cooking, slang, etc.? What is the same, and what is different?
This is a good question. I've been to TN but never been to NC so are there any similarities?
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Old 04-13-2007, 03:05 PM
 
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Ok, since no one has replied with any info, I'll ask some more specifics to see if anyone knows. The TN side of the Smokies seems to be very touristy. Have heard that the NC is more upscale and liberal and artsy. True? Is this the tip of the iceburg with differences? Is the piedmont similar geographically to Middle Tennessee? Some states in the union share a border but little else. Are NC and TN like that or are they sister states?
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Old 04-13-2007, 03:42 PM
 
Location: Up above the world so high!
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Originally Posted by Scholar View Post
Ok, since no one has replied with any info, I'll ask some more specifics to see if anyone knows. The TN side of the Smokies seems to be very touristy. Have heard that the NC is more upscale and liberal and artsy. True? Is this the tip of the iceburg with differences? Is the piedmont similar geographically to Middle Tennessee? Some states in the union share a border but little else. Are NC and TN like that or are they sister states?
Let's see if I can help... The first 10 to 20 miles on either side of the state line along I40 is very similar - RUGGED. If you look at a map you will see that is because the state line basically follows the Appalachian Mts. This rugged area gets some of the most extreme weather either state ever gets. These areas have never been very populated. People who have lived in the little communities or "hollows" of the mountains are a tough bunch. And as breathtaking as the scenery is, life there has never been easy. So, I believe the people of these mountains are very similar, no matter which side of the state line they live on. They are a hardy bunch, self-reliant, not too trusting of folks from other places. But I think, good salt of the earth kinds of folks. Most of them know the land around them intimately and have had many generations of their family members live on it before them.

The TN side of the Great Smokey Mt. National Park is touristy, but only in and near Gatlinburg and Pigeon Forge. The NC side of the park is somewhat geared for tourists with the Harrahs casinon in Cherokee and other indian attractions. Still, these are two very small areas when you consider the entire length of the state line between the two states. These are not places outsiders move or relocate to.

About equal distance away from the state line are the two largest cities in the far ends of their states - Asheville and Knoxville. To me, they have a lot in common. Both have universities and colleges. Both have medical facilities to support the far ends of their respective states. Both are now getting a fair share of retirees relocating to the area. Asheville probably has the more active arts community and gay communities. I wouldn't say either city is "upscale" in its entirety, though they each have some areas that are upscale. In my humble opinion, Asheville is the more beautiful city - though if developers there don't get reined in that will be changed forever.

As far as piedmont areas, I do believe Charlotte and Nashville have a lot in common. They are both nice cities, with similar population sizes. In both you will find many folks from different parts of the country settling in for a better life. I personally think Nashville is a bit more scenic in its topography.

I sure hope this helps you in some small way
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Old 04-13-2007, 05:02 PM
 
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lovesMountains, thank you so much for your detailed and thoughtful post. Because we have deep Tennessee roots, your descriptions have given us more insight than you know. I was leary of posting such a random sounding question, so the fact that you answered it so thoughtfully is a huge relief. Thanks again!
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Old 04-13-2007, 05:31 PM
 
Location: in a house
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Originally Posted by Scholar View Post
I know you share a national park, but do you share other things, too, like cultures, cooking, slang, etc.? What is the same, and what is different?
Cloggers in TN are a bit "bouncier" than in NC, but I don't care - it's great watching (and trying to learn!)
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Old 04-13-2007, 06:11 PM
 
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Originally Posted by lovesMountains View Post
Let's see if I can help... The first 10 to 20 miles on either side of the state line along I40 is very similar - RUGGED. If you look at a map you will see that is because the state line basically follows the Appalachian Mts. This rugged area gets some of the most extreme weather either state ever gets. These areas have never been very populated. People who have lived in the little communities or "hollows" of the mountains are a tough bunch. And as breathtaking as the scenery is, life there has never been easy. So, I believe the people of these mountains are very similar, no matter which side of the state line they live on. They are a hardy bunch, self-reliant, not too trusting of folks from other places. But I think, good salt of the earth kinds of folks. Most of them know the land around them intimately and have had many generations of their family members live on it before them.

The TN side of the Great Smokey Mt. National Park is touristy, but only in and near Gatlinburg and Pigeon Forge. The NC side of the park is somewhat geared for tourists with the Harrahs casinon in Cherokee and other indian attractions. Still, these are two very small areas when you consider the entire length of the state line between the two states. These are not places outsiders move or relocate to.

About equal distance away from the state line are the two largest cities in the far ends of their states - Asheville and Knoxville. To me, they have a lot in common. Both have universities and colleges. Both have medical facilities to support the far ends of their respective states. Both are now getting a fair share of retirees relocating to the area. Asheville probably has the more active arts community and gay communities. I wouldn't say either city is "upscale" in its entirety, though they each have some areas that are upscale. In my humble opinion, Asheville is the more beautiful city - though if developers there don't get reined in that will be changed forever.

As far as piedmont areas, I do believe Charlotte and Nashville have a lot in common. They are both nice cities, with similar population sizes. In both you will find many folks from different parts of the country settling in for a better life. I personally think Nashville is a bit more scenic in its topography.

I sure hope this helps you in some small way
Thank you so much for all the information! No matter how many books or websites you look at there is nothing like the view from someone who lives in NC. IF I remember correctly, you have posted some beautiful NC pictures. Maybe you should work for the NC Tourism Bureau! Thank you again!
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Old 04-14-2007, 10:09 AM
 
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Very interesting! I think I'm a southern girl at heart and I would like to move to North Carolina or Tennessee as soon as possible--but reality is probably in about 2 years. Wonder if I could afford anything down there by then? (Asheville is getting VERY expensive!)
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Old 04-14-2007, 12:57 PM
 
Location: Up above the world so high!
45,269 posts, read 91,900,068 times
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Originally Posted by Scholar View Post
lovesMountains, thank you so much for your detailed and thoughtful post. Because we have deep Tennessee roots, your descriptions have given us more insight than you know. I was leary of posting such a random sounding question, so the fact that you answered it so thoughtfully is a huge relief. Thanks again!
Hey, glad I helped in any way at all Southern roots DO run deep don't they?
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Old 04-14-2007, 01:03 PM
 
Location: Up above the world so high!
45,269 posts, read 91,900,068 times
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Originally Posted by bargainmom View Post
Very interesting! I think I'm a southern girl at heart and I would like to move to North Carolina or Tennessee as soon as possible--but reality is probably in about 2 years. Wonder if I could afford anything down there by then? (Asheville is getting VERY expensive!)
I would say this, don't despair. While we are experiencing tremendous growth in our 4 major metro areas there will always be room for folks who can look to live a bit away from those areas. You just have to know where to look

It helps if you don't need a job when you get here - you'd have so many places to choose from. But, if you are still needing to work when you make the move I would suggest this...do your homework now on where the most plentiful jobs in your field are. For instance, if you are an IT professional don't get your heart set on Asheville - look to Raleigh. Once you have figured out the most likely place to land a job come to this forum often and learn about the smaller surrounding areas near that job. I do believe you will still find your niche by the time you can come. Good luck!
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