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Old 07-11-2009, 07:22 PM
 
Location: North Durham
113 posts, read 249,486 times
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Can anyone point me in the direction of any statistical data dealing with Snake bites and children within NC state? I want to know: How many registered, diagnostics (which snake) and prognosis. Thanks
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Old 07-11-2009, 09:01 PM
 
Location: Five Points
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Last time that I read stats, only something like 6 people die every year in the US of snake bites. And those are usually folks bitten by rattlers when they are way out in the woods. I am a lifelong hunter, outdoorsman that grew up in the in the woods and swamps of eastern NC. I have seen less than 20 snakes in the wild in my 43 years. Most were black or king snakes. 4 or 5 copperheads, 2 eastern diamondbacks(scary) and 1 cottonmouth. Snakes brains pick up on human footsteps from 25 feet away. They are scared of humans and thus they are rarely seen. Early spring is the dangerous time because they have just come out of their holes and are pissed off and very sluggish. This is when people and dogs walk up on copperheads and get bit. Overall, I would not give one minute of thought to snakes unless you are in the woods during the summer months. Then, just use common sense. Sorry for the long post.

We are home to copperheads, cottonmouths, eastern diamondbacks, pigmy rattler, canebrake rattler and very rarely the coral snake.
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Old 07-12-2009, 10:06 AM
 
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Snakes are not a real hazard for kids out in the woods and fields. What they and you need to be wary of are ticks, now that they carry Lyme Disease and Rocky Mountain Spotted fever.

Ground nesting Yellow Jackets, nasty little buggers, and you are in them before you are aware, and they will wear you out.

In the Piedmont and coastal areas, fire ants. Too cold in the mountains so no personal experience, but they sound unpleasant. Chiggers, well not dangerous, but very unpleasant tiny little red buggers that bore into your skin and itch like fire. Poison Ivy also thrives in many areas.

The woods and fields were our play grounds growing up. We had a number of unpleasant encounters but never a snake. Sure we saw some, and we could find one if we went looking under rocks, logs, or in sheds or barns. But a snake wants to avoid you as much as you want to avoid them.
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Old 07-12-2009, 08:01 PM
 
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You're more apt to be "bitten" by 2 legged snakes than by any reptile in this state!
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Old 01-07-2010, 07:34 AM
 
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I am about to hunt for my first time this year in NC, what should I be aware of in the woods? Any advice would be much appreciated. Any hunter out there been bitten by snakes?
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Old 01-07-2010, 04:01 PM
 
Location: The 12th State
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your biggest threat will be ticks, bees ( watch for little rocks with caves underneath,)
biting knats, mosquitoes then snakes
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Old 01-07-2010, 04:06 PM
 
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It depends on what month(s) you're hunting in and the temperature. If you hunt anywhere in this state this weekend, you won't have to worry about any kind of bugs or insects or reptiles, no matter what anybody else tells you!! The biggest threat to some people in the fall and spring is poison ivy or poison oak.

Quote:
Originally Posted by heredaf View Post
I am about to hunt for my first time this year in NC, what should I be aware of in the woods? Any advice would be much appreciated. Any hunter out there been bitten by snakes?
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Old 01-07-2010, 08:06 PM
 
Location: State of Being
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Davidson provides one of the best online resources for info on snakes.

Here's a link:

North Carolina Online Snake Identification System

You and your kids will be much more likely to get Lyme Disease or Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever than ever be bitten by a snake. I have lived here all my life, have encountered quite a few snakes along the way b/c of the areas I happened to be in (messing with wood piles, hiking, gardening). Basically, snakes don't want to be around people and will avoid humans. As long as you are paying attention, you will only rarely come very close at all to any type of snake.

But getting Lyme Disease or Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever would not be uncommon. I have family members who have contracted both of those diseases. Read up on proper dressing, use of insect spray, etc as the rate for both diseases here in NC ranks pretty high.

Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever

3 Tips for Avoiding Tick Bites and Lyme Disease - US News and World Report

Good for you that you are finding out the info to stay safe!
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Old 07-14-2011, 06:58 AM
 
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I believe pipsky was inquiring about snake bite data, not ticks and so on.

Here is a good article from American Family Physician Venomous Snakebites in the United States: Management Review and Update - April 1, 2002 - American Family Physician

And, while I did not do an extensive search, this wikipedia site is very interesting and more importantly has an extensive bibliography: Snakebite - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

And of course, the CDC is the definitive authority on the subjects of injury and illness; here is their venomous snake page (should be able to find hard statistics from here): CDC - Venomous Snakes - NIOSH Workplace Safety and Health Topic
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Old 07-14-2011, 08:49 AM
 
Location: Raleigh, NC
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gcarter121 View Post
I believe pipsky was inquiring about snake bite data, not ticks and so on.
I believe his post was over two years ago.
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