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Old 02-10-2012, 04:53 AM
 
1,503 posts, read 2,097,321 times
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Detailing the problems of ‘breast cancer culture’ - The Washington Post

Interesting column. The pink ribbon group didn't irk me until those "Save the ta-tas" car magnets started making an appearance. Really? Women are dying, having to endure painful and sometimes ineffective treatment and that's your response?
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Old 02-10-2012, 05:55 AM
 
Location: Loudoun County, VA
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Very interesting but maybe on the wrong board?
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Old 02-10-2012, 07:04 AM
 
Location: Virginia
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Normally I'd agree, but in this instance I think there's a point to the humor. Making people comfortable with talking about "breasts" and "cancer" is saving a lot of lives. Back in the early 70s my grandmother died of breast cancer, and one of the reasons she didn't get detected in time (or tell anybody else that she was sick) was that saying the word "breast" was a no no. I have a feeling my grandmother didn't want to admit she even had breasts. And the word "cancer" was even worse--you never talked about having it. It was an unspoken word, as embarrassing as talking about someone having syphilis.

When people started being comfortable with the words "breast" and "cancer" women started finding out they had family histories of it. And women started feeling comfortable going to the doctor and getting preventative measures. Health insurance started covering procedures only after it became something everyone talked about. Self examinations became an everyday thing to do, not something embarrassing. Contributing money for research became a cool thing to do, not something that you wouldn't talk about in public.

ps. I agree this belongs in the health forum.
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Old 02-10-2012, 07:16 AM
 
Location: New-Dentist Colony
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Caladium, I see your point, and I agree that the change is good. We shouldn't be prudish about any part of the body when it comes to healthcare.

That said, I think that when any message achieves complete media saturation, viewer fatigue sets in. We all get bombarded with slogans all day, encouraging us to donate, think, act a certain way. I'm glad there's more funding for breast cancer, but maybe they've gone overboard with the ribbons and whatnot.

To my mind, here's the most compelling sentence in the article: "... many of the companies that donate to breast cancer charities — Revlon, AstraZeneca, Ford, Yoplait — have manufactured goods that contain or expel known carcinogens, estrogenics and endocrine disruptors."
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Old 02-10-2012, 07:21 AM
 
Location: Virginia
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Carlingtonian View Post

That said, I think that when any message achieves complete media saturation, viewer fatigue sets in. We all get bombarded with slogans all day,
Fair enough, and that does put the local spin on this topic. I agree that in this metro area in particular we do get bombarded with it. I think people all over the country get fixated on the idea of "taking the message to DC" to the point that we really do get overloaded.
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Old 02-10-2012, 07:48 AM
 
Location: DMV
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I know as a man this is sort of out of my realm, but I've always wondered why do women continue to support these groups? I mean when they create all this merchandise for 'awareness', does anybody ever ask how much money is actually going to research? I'm sure it cost a lot of money to have advertisements, t-shirts, pins, races, etc., but it still continues without really hearing about the research that is being done. I honestly believe that women are being exploited and their using this subject as a money grab. Isn't the whole point to try to find a cure? At what point is making people aware of this, has gone too far?
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Old 02-10-2012, 07:57 AM
 
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Meatkins, good point--we all need to do this. I think the recent news may change that. More women and men will look more closely at how their donations of time and money are being utilized (or not) to support research to stop cancer. The Better Business Bureau has a great site where consumers can check out how a charity rates on 22 criteria, including what part of the budget goes for fundraising, etc., vs. to help victims, fund research, etc. Some charities blow off the BBB's request for information. I wish everyone would use this site and boycott charities that do not respond or do not stack up well. Accountability is a good thing.
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Old 02-10-2012, 08:02 AM
 
Location: New-Dentist Colony
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Quote:
Originally Posted by meatkins View Post
I know as a man this is sort of out of my realm, but I've always wondered why do women continue to support these groups? I mean when they create all this merchandise for 'awareness', does anybody ever ask how much money is actually going to research? I'm sure it cost a lot of money to have advertisements, t-shirts, pins, races, etc., but it still continues without really hearing about the research that is being done. I honestly believe that women are being exploited and their using this subject as a money grab. Isn't the whole point to try to find a cure? At what point is making people aware of this, has gone too far?
Research has actually led to some pretty big strides in treatment, not just for breast cancer but other cancers as well. The strides are incremental, however, and take years to confirm. And they often don't make a good 2-minute news story. To report that the median survival time increased by 2 months with cisplatin versus oxalaplatin doesn't keep Joe Idiot Viewer's interest--but it has relevance for the patient. Research journals report such progress, but it only makes the news when the result is proven (which takes science years to achieve) and of such major impact that the average person will understand it and find it interesting.

That's not to say that these groups may be using more of this money for "overhead" than they should. But all nonprofits do fundraising, and fundraising does cost some money to conduct.
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Old 03-07-2012, 12:00 PM
 
Location: On the Ohio River in Western, KY
3,388 posts, read 5,998,921 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Carlingtonian View Post
To my mind, here's the most compelling sentence in the article: "... many of the companies that donate to breast cancer charities — Revlon, AstraZeneca, Ford, Yoplait — have manufactured goods that contain or expel known carcinogens, estrogenics and endocrine disruptors."
Sadly, it's all too true.

Think Before You Pink »

Think Before You Pink » Think Before You Pink Toolkit
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Old 03-07-2012, 12:51 PM
 
1,759 posts, read 1,829,599 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pgtitans View Post
I know as a man this is sort of out of my realm, but I've always wondered why do women continue to support these groups?

Some of us don't. But yeah, I don't understand it either.

I mean when they create all this merchandise for 'awareness', does anybody ever ask how much money is actually going to research?

Yep. And that's why I don't buy into it.
This is why, when Susan G. Komen [initially; before cowardly backtracking] withdrew its support for PP, I was thinking that it
didn't bother me much that people were all up in arms, freaking out,
stickin-it-to-SGK-by-sending-donations-to-PP-instead, and so on,
because I never felt SGK was a reputable company in the first place.
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