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Old 04-30-2009, 06:57 PM
 
Location: Marshall-Shadeland, Pittsburgh, PA
32,616 posts, read 77,579,178 times
Reputation: 19101

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Hello!

I am going to be moving within walking distance of St. Anne's, and I was wondering if anyone on the forum currently attends services there and can give me some insight on as to what I could expect a typical service. I'm coming from a very traditional Lutheran/Missouri Synod background, so reading on the church's web site that it is "welcoming, diverse, engaged, and progressive" leads me to believe that Episcopalians have a more contextual interpretation of the Bible as contrasted to the more literal interpretation of the Bible that we Lutheran/Missouri Synod Protestants are accustomed to, correct?

Judging from the descriptions I'd be most interested in attending the 9 AM service, but what are the Episcopalian standards for communion? Do I have to be "re"-confirmed? I'm also interested in the educational hour that they offer in the hour subsequent to the 9 AM service. What sorts of topics are discussed?

Any and all insight would be greatly appreciated, as I think this church would be a good fit for me.
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Old 05-01-2009, 02:29 PM
 
Location: Marshall-Shadeland, Pittsburgh, PA
32,616 posts, read 77,579,178 times
Reputation: 19101
Well if nobody knows anything about this church then I'll just go myself on some Sunday when I get down to Reston, scope it out, and then report back with my findings! I don't think becoming Episcopalian will sit well with my rather conservative family, since I think the Episcopalians were involved with the big brou-ha-ha for installing a gay pastor not long ago, but we shall see. God is God, right?
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Old 05-01-2009, 02:38 PM
 
428 posts, read 1,114,484 times
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I think your best bet is to be in direct contact with the priest at St. Anne's. I'm sure you've learned growing up as an LCMS Lutheran that, while the Synod does act as the governing body, per se, for the Church, there are still noticeable differences between individual congregations. The Episcopal Church is probably much same way.

I'm actually a fellow LCMS Lutheran, so I obviously don't know anything about St. Anne's in particular, but I do know that the ELCA Lutheran Church and the Episcopal Church are in communal fellowship, if that's any help.

Talk with the priest at St. Anne's. I'm sure he or she would be delighted to have a conversation with you, whether in person or via telephone. And don't allow the anticipated reaction of your family, friends, or anyone else to sway you in your decision to -- or not to -- convert from one denomination to another. This is between you and God. If, for whatever reason, if still needs to be between you, God, and someone else for you, then I think you'd be wise to give your decision a bit more prayerful consideration.

All the best to you in your search! I hope you find a denomination and congregation in which you, your heart, and your soul can be happy and at peace.
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Old 08-14-2009, 08:44 AM
 
Location: Reston
1 posts, read 5,196 times
Reputation: 10
St. Anne's is among the most Progressive churches in the area (I go there). Please feel free to visit!
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Old 08-14-2009, 11:06 AM
 
24 posts, read 83,511 times
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ScranBarre: my family and I attended during Lent a few years ago. We found St. Anne's to be a friendly, welcoming church with a lot of families. They have a phenomenal music program. I know the physical church shouldn't matter so much, but it's very 70s--round altar, white walls, and that did turn me off. Call me shallow.

As for Communion, in the Episcopal church you just need to be a baptized Christian, although it's not like they're carding you at the altar.
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Old 08-14-2009, 03:50 PM
 
Location: Marshall-Shadeland, Pittsburgh, PA
32,616 posts, read 77,579,178 times
Reputation: 19101
Quote:
Originally Posted by philvollman View Post
St. Anne's is among the most Progressive churches in the area (I go there). Please feel free to visit!
Quote:
Originally Posted by idrive View Post
ScranBarre: my family and I attended during Lent a few years ago. We found St. Anne's to be a friendly, welcoming church with a lot of families. They have a phenomenal music program. I know the physical church shouldn't matter so much, but it's very 70s--round altar, white walls, and that did turn me off. Call me shallow.

As for Communion, in the Episcopal church you just need to be a baptized Christian, although it's not like they're carding you at the altar.
Thank you both very much for the insight. I have since decided to join the flock of Good Shepherd Lutheran Church along Reston Avenue in Herndon.
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Old 08-15-2009, 01:39 PM
 
5 posts, read 16,761 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by philvollman View Post
St. Anne's is among the most Progressive churches in the area (I go there). Please feel free to visit!
Are you familar with other Epispocal churches in the area? We're moving to Burke soon, and are very intrested in finding a liberal episcopal church a bit closer. Any recommendations?
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Old 08-15-2009, 08:36 PM
 
Location: Marshall-Shadeland, Pittsburgh, PA
32,616 posts, read 77,579,178 times
Reputation: 19101
Quote:
Originally Posted by finn3716 View Post
Are you familar with other Epispocal churches in the area? We're moving to Burke soon, and are very intrested in finding a liberal episcopal church a bit closer. Any recommendations?
I visited several churches in the Dulles Tech Corridor area, and all were decidely more "progressive" than to what I was accustomed back in Pennsylvania. My current Lutheran church, even though it is part of the more traditional Missouri Synod faction, is still very progressive in my mind. I would think that most churches in the region would have a similar direction given the very high concentration of forward-thinking people in the area. Best of luck to you as you find a new place to share your faith!
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Old 04-08-2010, 10:27 AM
 
116 posts, read 427,804 times
Reputation: 18
This thread is old, but how is it going at Good Shepherd? I am thinking of joining that church. I have my two children signed up for preschool there in the Fall, and I was very impressed with the tour I had and everyone I met. Does the Church service seem family friendly?
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Old 12-29-2012, 12:11 PM
 
1 posts, read 2,619 times
Reputation: 10
Default I go to St Anne's & love it

Quote:
Originally Posted by SteelCityRising View Post
Hello!

I am going to be moving within walking distance of St. Anne's, and I was wondering if anyone on the forum currently attends services there and can give me some insight on as to what I could expect a typical service. I'm coming from a very traditional Lutheran/Missouri Synod background, so reading on the church's web site that it is "welcoming, diverse, engaged, and progressive" leads me to believe that Episcopalians have a more contextual interpretation of the Bible as contrasted to the more literal interpretation of the Bible that we Lutheran/Missouri Synod Protestants are accustomed to, correct?

Judging from the descriptions I'd be most interested in attending the 9 AM service, but what are the Episcopalian standards for communion? Do I have to be "re"-confirmed? I'm also interested in the educational hour that they offer in the hour subsequent to the 9 AM service. What sorts of topics are discussed?

Any and all insight would be greatly appreciated, as I think this church would be a good fit for me.
I have attended St Anne's Episcopal Church since 1987. I will try to answer your questions.
Your assumption that Episcoplians "have a more contextual interpretation of the Bible" than LC/MS is correct. The Lutheran Church Missouri Synod (LCMS) has traditions of literal Bible interpretation and a very high level of scholarship. The Episcopal Church (EC) shares this high regard for scholarship but believes that "a text without a context is a pretext." At St Anne's you will encounter a liturgical service from the Book of Common Prayer, three Bible readings plus a Psalm, a biblically-based sermon and the celebration of the Eucharist every Sunday at all services. You will also meet three priests (yeh, we call 'em priests), two of whom are women. You are warmly welcomed to St Anne's just because you want to attend. Standards for participation in communion are baptism -- period. Children take communion. And we actually don't check your baptismal creds, so all those who draw near in faith are welcome at the Lord's Table. If you are LC/MS your baptized in the name of the Father, Son and Holy Spirit and that works for us.

The EC has bishops (hey, it's episcopal!). The bishops stand in the apostolic succession. One can trace their conscration clear back to the apostles. If you want to be a "Real Episcopalian" you have to be confirmed by an apostolic bishop. When I joined the EC I was an ordained Presbyterian minister. I had baptized and confirmed a lot of people. I found the confirmation requirement hard to swallow, but I lived through it. Anyway, lots of people participate in the life of St Anne's who have not been confirmed.

The EC is not a confessing church; we have no doctirnal statement that corresponds to the Augsburg Confession. The EC recognizes three sources of authority: the Holy Scriptures, the traditions of the Church (safe-guarded by our bishops) and reason. Reason includes science. We believe the faith expressed in the liturgies of the Book of Common Prayer. The EC encourages a wide range of opinion and discussion of theological matters and the application of our faith to our daily lives. We call this process "discrenment" and believe God works in us as we work out our faith. We believe we are justified by faith and save by God's grace. We also believe God does not value us based on our theological opinions.

The EC values music as much as the LC/MS. St Anne's has a great music program. The 9:00 service is the most attended -- probably because of the children's Sunday School. At 9:00 there is a pick-up choir that does pretty simple music. The prelude at 9:00 features a classical guitar player who is AWESOME!

The 11:15 service has very high-class classical church music. The 5:00 is praise music and very informal. 7:45 has no music and uses the Rite I liturgy. Rite I is in the language of the Prayerbook handed down from Shakespeare's time. Rite II is the same liturgy in contemporary language. Most Episcopalians that I know were not raised in the EC. So the old prayerbook language, though beautiful, prompts no feelings of nostalgia. I think that's why Rite II services are more heavily attended. BTW I use Rite I in my private prayers.

You also asked about adult education. Adult ed is done in classes scheduled at times other than Sunday morning. The time after the 9:00 service is for children and youth. We have a lot of adult ed opportunities. The Sunday morning schedule just doesn't allow participation by all those who are interested.

With regard to the social ambience: St Anne's is NOT socially conservative. Straight people and gays worship together. The EC supported the civil rights movement from the beginning. St Anne's in particular had a lot to do with the early development of Reston. If you learn about Reston's history you will encounter Embry Rucker. Embry was St Anne's first rector. He started the church in the Common Ground Coffee Shop on Lake Anne. He also started theRIBS bus and Reston Interfaith, and was instrumental in keeping Reston going in the early years. Reston's homeless shelter is named for him. We are still engaged in Reston Interfaith, feeding the homeless, citizenship classes and other services to the community.

I hope this answered some of your questions. Sorry if I have gone on and on. I don't know when you posted this. I hope I am not too late welcoming you to Reston.
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