Welcome to City-Data.com Forum!
U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Virginia > Northern Virginia
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 07-29-2009, 07:27 PM
 
64 posts, read 233,117 times
Reputation: 45

Advertisements

I am looking at GMU for a part-time MBA sometime in the near future.

What is the general perception of this school?
Well known in the area, not really known outside the area?
Extremely diverse, but no sense of community because everyone commutes?
I'm not interested in going to the "best" school, but are there any others you would suggest over GMU?

For me, GMU is affordable, convenient and practical.

Thanks.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 07-29-2009, 07:41 PM
 
Location: Huntersville/Charlotte, NC and Washington, DC
26,700 posts, read 41,798,419 times
Reputation: 41398
Quote:
Originally Posted by novadude View Post
I am looking at GMU for a part-time MBA sometime in the near future.

What is the general perception of this school?
Well known in the area, not really known outside the area?
Extremely diverse, but no sense of community because everyone commutes?
I'm not interested in going to the "best" school, but are there any others you would suggest over GMU?

For me, GMU is affordable, convenient and practical.

Thanks.
From my studies at Northern VA Comm College GMU was the school that everyone was trying to transfer to. It has a really good rep in the area and the school's Final Four basketball run a few years ago probably opened a few eyes around the country. I wouldnt expect a strong sense of community because of commuters but, call me crazy, i thought you went to college to get a degree not make friends?

As for MBAs, i saw a post on the Colleges and Universites forum that suggested that an MBA would be a waste of time unless it was from a top 20 school and GMU likely dont fit that criteria. So you may want to research that.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-29-2009, 08:05 PM
 
Location: Weaverville
765 posts, read 2,570,876 times
Reputation: 404
GMU is a full university not a community college. I have a BS, MS, and PhD from GMU and can tell you it is highly regarded. It is not among the private ivy like its parent school UVA but in its areas of specialization it is the equal of the other major Va universities. One big strength is its access to top government officials and businessmen who fill adjunct professor positions. Also a good source of internships and jobs. I started at the Dept of Interior as a senior in college and 32 years later am about to retire. Went from an entry level position to a 6-figure income and a leader in my field. Remember though that the degree just gets you in the door, success comes from hard work and your own abilities. Good luck.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-29-2009, 08:28 PM
 
4,709 posts, read 12,687,713 times
Reputation: 3814
I work near GMU and the weekend that the students arrive I see many, many cars with out-of-state plates....so it must be known out of the area. Coach L's Final Four team is probably mainly responsible for this.

The "commuter" school rep might be fading also...they are building dorms as fast as they can it seems.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-29-2009, 09:05 PM
 
446 posts, read 1,649,693 times
Reputation: 151
GMU definitely has grown by leaps and bounds and I respect it.

That being said, I would not want to go there as an undergrad as I feel it is too large of a commuter school. Too many people come in and leave as fast as they can to get back to their family responsibilities, etc. There of course is nothing wrong with that, but it is a way of college life that is noticeably different from say UVA or JMU where school is the end all be all (aside from your part-time job) and you're focused on being involved 24/7 on campus.

Again, different viewpoints make the world go round. But I will strongly encourage my future children to choose a school with a very small commuter population.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-29-2009, 09:49 PM
 
Location: Downtown Silver Spring
177 posts, read 457,052 times
Reputation: 85
GMU has my respect. During my undergrad days, the lady who taught my Data Encryption class was a GMU alum and boy that lady was SMART and she knew her stuff. I've also met a couple of GMU alums and going from my perceptions, I'd give GMU two thumbs up.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-30-2009, 06:59 AM
 
Location: Falls Church, VA
722 posts, read 1,983,424 times
Reputation: 316
If you're doing a part-time program, I don't think it will really matter if the school is a commuter school or not. I mean, you won't even have much of a chance to get involved in the school community yourself if you're only there a few hours a week. It would be different for undergrad.

GMU has a decent enough reputation. And I totally agree that they get some excellent teachers due to their proximity to DC and business in the region. The program at UMD is better, that would be my first choice in the area, but it's probably a little too far to commute from NoVA.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-30-2009, 07:22 AM
 
50 posts, read 202,871 times
Reputation: 19
GMU's reputation is growing so I consider it a good education investment, ie by the time you graduate it will be harder to get admission to than when you started and for a good price to boot.

The commuter school comments have been true in the past, but at the clip new student housing is being built that is changing more and more. And out of stater's have been coming to GMU for a long time before the final four, when I was an undergrad there I know we had tons of people from out of state, especially New Jersey, not sure why, but its probably why our unofficial basketball theme song is Livin on a Prayer by Bon Jovi hahaa.

I can't speak to the MBA program, but I know GMU has established its self as a leader in several fields, like conflict resolution, economics, biodefense etc that have helped raise the schools profile, but if you go outside the area, not that many people are familiar with the school. As another poster mentioned, one of the huge benefits is the proximity to DC and the adjuncts the school pulls in. My last Government class was taught by Tom Davis while he was still in Congress.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-30-2009, 07:24 AM
 
5,125 posts, read 10,101,492 times
Reputation: 2871
Quote:
Originally Posted by CaseyMac View Post
GMU definitely has grown by leaps and bounds and I respect it.

That being said, I would not want to go there as an undergrad as I feel it is too large of a commuter school. Too many people come in and leave as fast as they can to get back to their family responsibilities, etc. There of course is nothing wrong with that, but it is a way of college life that is noticeably different from say UVA or JMU where school is the end all be all (aside from your part-time job) and you're focused on being involved 24/7 on campus.

Again, different viewpoints make the world go round. But I will strongly encourage my future children to choose a school with a very small commuter population.
I think your view is the majority view in this area among parents, but I will say that a lot of private employers in the area love to hire GMU grads, or at least top GMU grads, precisely because they seem to have a more down-to-earth, ready-to-work attitude than graduates of many other colleges or universities who aren't quite ready yet for a full-time job or are too busy singing their own praises.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-30-2009, 07:41 AM
 
66 posts, read 199,789 times
Reputation: 39
Going to George Mason as a part-time graduate student is different from going there full-time as an undergrad. Most of the students I knew who went to George Mason, as an undergrad, were easily distracted and took more than 4 years to finish. But that was over a decade ago when GMU's reputation wasn't quite as good as it is now. They have really built up the school facilities and academics. A lot of the classes are taught by people in the industry, so you gain industry perspective. And local companies and government know the university and readily hire graduates.

I personally don't believe that the MBA program is as strong as say University of Maryland or possibly George Washington University. But those programs are quite pricey. If I were to get an MBA, I would consider GMU just for price and convenience. It is a commuter school, but most MBA students will probably be part-time like you are considering. Plus the students usually make it a point to get together to get projects done as necessary.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:


Settings
X
Data:
Loading data...
Based on 2000-2022 data
Loading data...

123
Hide US histogram


Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Virginia > Northern Virginia

All times are GMT -6.

© 2005-2024, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Contact Us - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35, 36, 37 - Top