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Old 07-11-2017, 01:09 PM
 
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Anybody know how long it takes to drive from Whiting IN down to the loop? Just curious.
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Old 07-11-2017, 01:56 PM
 
3,480 posts, read 2,149,969 times
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Originally Posted by jvr789 View Post
Anybody know how long it takes to drive from Whiting IN down to the loop? Just curious.
Google maps says 32 minutes right now and anywhere from 30-70 minutes on a typical weekday morning commute. A very reasonable commute if you work downtown but with a population of less than 5,000 few are able to enjoy..
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Old 07-11-2017, 02:01 PM
 
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I think My Kind Of Town makes good points, and I think the rebuttals are fair as well.

What's more centrally located to employment opportunities Chicagoland area? Of course it's the near West suburbs, more so than NWI. I don't particularly think anyone would dispute that, and if they do, they're biased.

If you're talking job opportunity and being centrally located, then really what you're doing is assuming that you're going to change jobs in the relatively near future, and in that case, want to be covered when it comes to living close enough to that job. To each his own, however, I would say most people don't really have any particular expectation that they'll leave their current job in the near future, or at least if they did, could hone in their future jobs to specific areas (i.e. only jobs in the loop or W/SW burbs). Or, if it REALLY comes to it, if you live in NWI and there's a job in the far NW or Northern suburbs, then... just move there if the job makes it financially advantageous to live in that location as well. Seems pretty simple. But, to pay a premium in not only housing costs, but taxes, and normal every day costs of living... for the trade off being centrally located in case you need to find another job.... To me, that seems, not to be the most financially prudent decision.
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Old 07-11-2017, 02:36 PM
 
3,480 posts, read 2,149,969 times
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Originally Posted by svillechris View Post
I think My Kind Of Town makes good points, and I think the rebuttals are fair as well.

What's more centrally located to employment opportunities Chicagoland area? Of course it's the near West suburbs, more so than NWI. I don't particularly think anyone would dispute that, and if they do, they're biased.

If you're talking job opportunity and being centrally located, then really what you're doing is assuming that you're going to change jobs in the relatively near future, and in that case, want to be covered when it comes to living close enough to that job. To each his own, however, I would say most people don't really have any particular expectation that they'll leave their current job in the near future, or at least if they did, could hone in their future jobs to specific areas (i.e. only jobs in the loop or W/SW burbs). Or, if it REALLY comes to it, if you live in NWI and there's a job in the far NW or Northern suburbs, then... just move there if the job makes it financially advantageous to live in that location as well. Seems pretty simple. But, to pay a premium in not only housing costs, but taxes, and normal every day costs of living... for the trade off being centrally located in case you need to find another job.... To me, that seems, not to be the most financially prudent decision.
I think you are missing a big part of my perspective on this. Being centrally located to employment centers isn't just about assuming you are going to change jobs in the near future, it's about being ready and able to move to a better opportunity if it arises. Why would I want to limit my employment options to one part of the metro area? A few other points on this. Sometimes people change jobs not by choice but because they have to. Having spent the early part of my career during the Great Recession, I saw many people forced out not because they were poor performers but because there was not enough work to keep them employed. Having flexibility when hit with hard times is huge. Also, how many people really spend their entire career with the same employer these days? Recent studies show that the average person changes jobs 12 times throughout their career. For the average person that's once every 3.5 years! It's not that every job change will result in a drastically new work location within the metro area but let's say 1/3 of them do. I really don't want to be moving every 8-10 years because my work location moved from Chicago to Glenview to Naperville. Moving becomes even more difficult for young families that desire continuity for their kids in the local school system/church/sports/etc.

I guess that's where the old adage of location, location, location comes from...
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Old 07-11-2017, 02:47 PM
 
811 posts, read 2,327,130 times
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Originally Posted by My Kind Of Town View Post
I think you are missing a big part of my perspective on this. Being centrally located to employment centers isn't just about assuming you are going to change jobs in the near future, it's about being ready and able to move to a better opportunity if it arises. Why would I want to limit my employment options to one part of the metro area? A few other points on this. Sometimes people change jobs not by choice but because they have to. Having spent the early part of my career during the Great Recession, I saw many people forced out not because they were poor performers but because there was not enough work to keep them employed. Having flexibility when hit with hard times is huge. Also, how many people really spend their entire career with the same employer these days? Recent studies show that the average person changes jobs 12 times throughout their career. For the average person that's once every 3.5 years! It's not that every job change will result in a drastically new work location within the metro area but let's say 1/3 of them do. I really don't want to be moving every 8-10 years because my work location moved from Chicago to Glenview to Naperville. Moving becomes even more difficult for young families that desire continuity for their kids in the local school system/church/sports/etc.

I guess that's where the old adage of location, location, location comes from...
Fair points, and I agree with most. The easy response is that just because this is your opinion on why a certain location is worth it, doesn't mean that other people are wrong when they have different opinions. The trade-off part is what you're missing, and that's frankly my main point. Again, I agree that living in, for example, Hinsdale, does allow you to jump at a new job opportunity quickly without having to move if an opportunity arises... when compared to living in NWI. However, the benefit to living in Hinsdale in that regard would be solely for new job opportunities in the North/NW suburbs. While there are many jobs in those locations, my point is that what you pay in excess of what someone in NWI would pay, for what you are characterizing as being job opportunity flexibility in the North and NW suburbs, really isn't worth it for most people. Hinsdale's a great town, and probably not the best example to use, but I think you get the point. It's a cost/benefit decision. The excess costs in exchange for flexibility if a job opens up in the North or NW suburbs. For me, that's an easy pass. For you, it may not be, and that's fine too. To each his own.

Another point - companies are increasingly becoming flexible with employees working from home. If not exclusively, then a few days a week. That also lessens the appeal to living in a centrally located town, especially when considering the additional costs of living in said towns.
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Old 07-11-2017, 03:11 PM
 
3,480 posts, read 2,149,969 times
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Originally Posted by svillechris View Post
Fair points, and I agree with most. The easy response is that just because this is your opinion on why a certain location is worth it, doesn't mean that other people are wrong when they have different opinions. The trade-off part is what you're missing, and that's frankly my main point. Again, I agree that living in, for example, Hinsdale, does allow you to jump at a new job opportunity quickly without having to move if an opportunity arises... when compared to living in NWI. However, the benefit to living in Hinsdale in that regard would be solely for new job opportunities in the North/NW suburbs. While there are many jobs in those locations, my point is that what you pay in excess of what someone in NWI would pay, for what you are characterizing as being job opportunity flexibility in the North and NW suburbs, really isn't worth it for most people. Hinsdale's a great town, and probably not the best example to use, but I think you get the point. It's a cost/benefit decision. The excess costs in exchange for flexibility if a job opens up in the North or NW suburbs. For me, that's an easy pass. For you, it may not be, and that's fine too. To each his own.

Another point - companies are increasingly becoming flexible with employees working from home. If not exclusively, then a few days a week. That also lessens the appeal to living in a centrally located town, especially when considering the additional costs of living in said towns.
I know what you are trying to say and I totally agree that I would choose a nice town in NWI over say Tinley Park or Orland Park. But I believe, and many others do as well, that paying a premium to live in nice IL towns that are more centrally located like Hinsdale, Oak Brook, Western Springs, and Elmhurst are well worth the added expense (ref: real estate prices as the tell-all metric for demand of these towns). The central location is a huge factor for these towns as well as the school performance, public safety, historic downtown areas, and beauty of the landscape/architecture to name a few.
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Old 07-11-2017, 04:02 PM
 
811 posts, read 2,327,130 times
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Originally Posted by My Kind Of Town View Post
I know what you are trying to say and I totally agree that I would choose a nice town in NWI over say Tinley Park or Orland Park. But I believe, and many others do as well, that paying a premium to live in nice IL towns that are more centrally located like Hinsdale, Oak Brook, Western Springs, and Elmhurst are well worth the added expense (ref: real estate prices as the tell-all metric for demand of these towns). The central location is a huge factor for these towns as well as the school performance, public safety, historic downtown areas, and beauty of the landscape/architecture to name a few.
I think we're basically agreeing, but coming at it from different perspectives. One other comment I'd make though is that there's a large number of people living in the towns you referenced (Hinsdale and Oak Brook in particular) where another grand or two per month of living expenses to live in those towns just doesn't really matter or put much of a dent in the budget. This conversation isn't really referencing the very well off folk who are able to absorb high costs, increasing taxes, etc. If I were in that same position, I'd probably live in Hinsdale as well. While NWI has plenty of very high earning residents and that number is growing daily, the desirable towns are generally regarded as a middle to upper middle class areas where household budgets still exist and cost/benefit decisions still have to be made.
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Old 07-11-2017, 07:49 PM
 
2,155 posts, read 5,460,935 times
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Originally Posted by svillechris View Post
I think we're basically agreeing, but coming at it from different perspectives. One other comment I'd make though is that there's a large number of people living in the towns you referenced (Hinsdale and Oak Brook in particular) where another grand or two per month of living expenses to live in those towns just doesn't really matter or put much of a dent in the budget. This conversation isn't really referencing the very well off folk who are able to absorb high costs, increasing taxes, etc. If I were in that same position, I'd probably live in Hinsdale as well. While NWI has plenty of very high earning residents and that number is growing daily, the desirable towns are generally regarded as a middle to upper middle class areas where household budgets still exist and cost/benefit decisions still have to be made.
THIS ^^^^^^^^^ deserve a standing ovation because most people fail to realize this.

To everyone else: Yes, there are folks out there who talk as if ALL of Illinois is just going down in the dumps and Indiana is the promised land. Many of these folks came from the most "middle-of-the-road" places in Illinois (at best) and from the most crime ridden ghettos (at worst) to better places in Indiana. So to them, it is the promise land. Folks that moved from south suburbs in the 90s to NWI moved to "the promised land"...they made generalizations such as "Indiana is much safer than Illinois" without clarifying that "DYER Indiana is much safer than SAUK VILLAGE Illinois". And don't get me started on the Move To Indy/Evan Bour guy...

At the end of the day, Illinois is not fighting to keep the Hinsdalians, Oak Brookians, Winnetkians (you all get the picture)...they are fighting to keep the Oak Forestians, Lansingians, Carol Streamians, etc. The more middle-of-the-road places in Illinois where folks are more vulnerable to tax increases.

If money were no obstacle for me, hands down, I would be in the North Shore, Oak Brook, Hinsdale, River Forest, or River North, Gold Coast, Streeterville, Lincoln Park, etc. Many folks would probably say the same. But for the vast majority of folks, money is an obstacle and for the more middle class families, they are the ones who have to decide to stay or go.

As far as commuting goes, most of NWI is within a reasonable commute to Chicago not much worse than some northwest suburbs (by driving). As far as trains go, yes, we are beat right now. However in average traffic, I can get from Munster to the Loop in 35 minutes...the fastest I have ever done it was 27 minutes. Munster borders Hammond which borders Chicago...we are not some faraway land. Most of the new Illinois residents to NWI have come from south side of Chicago and the south suburbs and were fleeing declining areas and areas undergoing a change from White to Black...now, we are seeing a lot more people from southwest suburbs that are NOT declining nor changing demographically but are just not seeing the advantage of living in an area like New Lenox vs St. John.

All in all, I wish that the bickering would just cease. People in NWI constantly acting like we would flourish so greatly if Chicago were to die as well as acting as if we do not have our crime issues here and people in Illinois acting like Chicago does not need their suburbs to continue to flourish. We all need one another. Not trying to have a "kumbaya" moment but its just nuts at this point. NWI is part of the Chicagoland area and the fact of the matter is that Chicagoland has NOT bottommed out. If it does, we will feel it for sure. MOST of the most upscale growth in NWI has been thanks to Illinois transplants and folks whom work in Illinois. Something that many locals do not like to admit.

As far as companies moving from Illinois to Indiana goes, most of the best ones that did move did NOT move to NWI...they went right to Indy. I have always said, I wish I-65 was filled with the white collar corporations that I-88 and I-290 are lined with...but instead, its either mostly empty or with warehouses of companies that leave after their 10-year tax abatement is up.
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Old 09-04-2017, 06:47 PM
 
Location: 53179
14,416 posts, read 22,397,972 times
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Originally Posted by CGab View Post
We moved to St. John from Plainfield last year. We do not regret the move and wish we had done it sooner. In your budget there will be more options in Dyer, Crown Point and Schererville than in Munster or St. John. A $300k home in Munster or St. John will be smaller and more outdated, but is possible. As far as diversity, I would rank as follows with highest to lowest as far as diversity with Munster on top and St. John being the least diverse as it is predominately white.


1. Munster
2. Schererville
3. Dyer
4. Crown Point
5. St. John


Munster has the best schools in the region (rated a 10) followed by Lake Central (which is all Dyer, Schererville & St. John rated between 7-9). Part of Crown Point goes to Lake Central schools and part go to Crown Point schools which are also highly rated. You can see all of these statistics on CD. Munster also has a great park district whereas St. John's park district is almost non-existent. I'm not sure about the park districts in the rest of the towns. Munster also has a great pubic pool.


As another poster stated property taxes are WAY lower than Illinois and no tax on food. Gas prices and utilities also seem to be lower. All the towns have Lake Michigan water (as far as I know) except St. John which has municipal well water. All the towns are family oriented! Lots of kids!

The drive downtown would depend on what town you choose and the time of day you are driving. Munster is the closest (about 29 miles) which would probably take you 40 minutes to an hour. St. John and Crown Point are the furthest and would take you at least an hour or possibly more. I believe there is the South Shore train in Hammond that can take you down town and that is expanding to Munster in the near future.
Really? That would be nice. Do you have any more info on this?
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Old 09-04-2017, 07:40 PM
 
Location: Saint John, IN
11,583 posts, read 6,685,745 times
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Originally Posted by glass_of_merlot View Post
Really? That would be nice. Do you have any more info on this?

South Shore Extension - Northwestern Indiana Regional Planning Commission | NIRPC


Changes made to South Shore's West Lake line plan - Post-Tribune
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