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Old 02-12-2019, 02:18 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GearHeadDave View Post
If you think about it in terms of what are considered "Appalachian" counties, here's a map. Almost half of Ohio is considered Appalachian. About the same as Kentucky, except the counties in Ohio stretch further West. They base this on topography, demographics, and economics.

https://www.arc.gov/research/mapsofa....asp?MAP_ID=31


I think that map is quite accurate. Note Clermont county, Ohio (next to Hamilton county where the city of Cincinnati is located) is the most western "Appalachian" county. I used to live in Hamilton county 1 mile from the Clermont county border. That area turned rural quickly when driving eastbound on US 125 into Clermont county.
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Old 02-12-2019, 04:17 PM
 
Location: The New England part of Ohio
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yu7][=These questions about regions are silly, easily answered and redundant. Not only about Ohio, but about ANY state that boarders another region.

It is generally accepted that Ohio is a Midwestern state. Consequently, ALL of Ohio is considered "Midwestern".

Can the far reaches of any state have attributes of a region that it boarders? Of course. Language, ethnicity, folkways, religion ans regional accents can blur at these boarders. That does not make the state "Southern".

I live in North Eastern OH. I am closer to Buffalo, Pittsburgh and even NYC, than I am to Chicago. That does not mean that my part of Ohio is in the Middle Atlantic or the North East.

Similarly, my area of Ohio was settled originally by people from Connecticut and many of the smaller towns retain a New England feel. There are towns with village greens and white clapboard churches and other topographic and archaeological features that are evocative of New England. My City Data location is facetious. There is no "New England part of Ohio".

Ohio is in the Midwest. Period.
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Old 02-20-2019, 09:01 AM
 
Location: Reynoldsburg, Ohio
408 posts, read 315,927 times
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I might have chimed in in these 29 pages ... not sure.
I don't consider southern Ohio "the South" by any means, but it's most definitely Appalachian. Having lived in Columbus most of my life, and four years on top of that in college in northwest Ohio, I consider probably 2/3 of this state solidly Midwestern in language, geography, attitudes and the like, but the cutoff is not far east of Columbus at all. To me, while all of Ohio is technically considered the Midwest, coming west I don't feel like I'm in the Midwest until I'm into Licking County on I-70 or approaching Lancaster on 33 heading toward Columbus where the land begins to flatten out and things just look Midwestern.
The counties in blue on the map on the previous page are a pretty good representation of where I think the Midwest cuts off and Appalachia begins, although I'd cut out Ashtabula and Trumbull.
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Old 02-24-2019, 05:40 AM
 
Location: Ohio
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One thing to keep in mind with the Appalachian Regional Commission county designation is that it has more to do with economics than culture and a lot of counties listed were lobbied by local Politicians to be included naturally for the funding ARC counties received. But for the most part, the map is fairly accaurate to where the Appalachian feel can be found.
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Old 02-24-2019, 06:08 AM
 
Location: Appalachian New York, Formerly Louisiana
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Quote:
Originally Posted by KY_Transplant View Post
One thing to keep in mind with the Appalachian Regional Commission county designation is that it has more to do with economics than culture and a lot of counties listed were lobbied by local Politicians to be included naturally for the funding ARC counties received. But for the most part, the map is fairly accaurate to where the Appalachian feel can be found.
True, though with some exception in Mississippi and northeastern-most Ohio, it is also geographically sound.

I know that as somebody who defends NY's position in the ARC people tend to question it a lot. Economically, the southern tier of NY has benefited from the assistance in a very real way. As one example; Old route 17, AKA route 86/the southern tier expy, was built almost entirely by the ARC and crosses some very harsh terrain for a highway.

People have also commented on how much higher the median income for NY's Appalachian counties is than anywhere south of it. What they neglect to acknowledge is two fold. One, the median income is enormously skewed by rich people who own second homes on the lakes, which dip into the southern tier, or wealthy retirees from downstate (it is not uncommon for people here to really only be earning 20-35k a year as a couple). And two, cost of living in NY state is much higher than WV or KY or TN. 25K still sucks in WV, but it sucks harder in NY because of CoL.

And of course, as stated above, it is geographically appropriate. The southern tier is entirely in the northern Alleghenies.

PS. I am not aiming this specifically at you, just putting it out there for any reader.

Last edited by CookieSkoon; 02-24-2019 at 06:27 AM..
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Old 02-24-2019, 06:37 AM
 
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Of course not
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Old 02-25-2019, 08:47 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Endoplasmic View Post
Of course not
Borders are just government delineations, not a strict cutoff for cultures and people. I don't understand how someone can say Kentucky is Southern, but right across the river in Ohio is not. They border each other. At least some parts of Southern Ohio must be Southern, unless we're saying the part of KY that borders OH is Midwestern.
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Old 02-25-2019, 09:41 AM
 
Location: Appalachian New York, Formerly Louisiana
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jessemh431 View Post
Borders are just government delineations, not a strict cutoff for cultures and people. I don't understand how someone can say Kentucky is Southern, but right across the river in Ohio is not. They border each other. At least some parts of Southern Ohio must be Southern, unless we're saying the part of KY that borders OH is Midwestern.
I've said it a thousand times but it bears repeating.

Border areas like the Ohio River are mixed. Elements of the north effect Kentucky, elements of the south effect Ohio. It doesn't go very far from the river itself, but the neighbors influence each other. It's never just one way.

Even within single regions different states can influence each other at the border areas. Northern PA and upstate NY, West Louisiana and east Texas, etc.
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Old 02-25-2019, 10:09 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CookieSkoon View Post
I've said it a thousand times but it bears repeating.

Border areas like the Ohio River are mixed. Elements of the north effect Kentucky, elements of the south effect Ohio. It doesn't go very far from the river itself, but the neighbors influence each other. It's never just one way.

Even within single regions different states can influence each other at the border areas. Northern PA and upstate NY, West Louisiana and east Texas, etc.
Oh for sure. I fully agree, especially with Central PA and southern Upstate NY. But I don't personally think there is anything Midwestern or "Northern" about the northeastern part of KY. Ashland and Grayson are NOT Midwestern or Northern. They are Southern and/or Appalachian, but NOT Midwestern or Northern. You can say its architecture or history or something is one way or another, but the people and the culture and the politics and just everything about them is Southern.

I don't consider Cincinnati and NKY Southern or Midwestern. I think they're both a blend. But the upriver border counties are more Southern than Midwestern.
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Old 02-25-2019, 10:51 AM
 
Location: Appalachian New York, Formerly Louisiana
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jessemh431 View Post
Oh for sure. I fully agree, especially with Central PA and southern Upstate NY. But I don't personally think there is anything Midwestern or "Northern" about the northeastern part of KY. Ashland and Grayson are NOT Midwestern or Northern. They are Southern and/or Appalachian, but NOT Midwestern or Northern. You can say its architecture or history or something is one way or another, but the people and the culture and the politics and just everything about them is Southern.

I don't consider Cincinnati and NKY Southern or Midwestern. I think they're both a blend. But the upriver border counties are more Southern than Midwestern.
Oh I wouldn't call Kentucky northern at all, but there certainly are people from Ohio (and Indiana) who moved there long ago, and their influence can be seen here and there.

I think the reason southern qualities stand out in Ohio more than the other way around is because more people from KY have moved north historically than vice-versa.

Calling back to that point in time when a lot of central Appalachian folk moved to Ohio and Michigan and Pittsburgh for work.

In some cases the reverse is true, where northern influence is what stands out more. Such as in Virginia, or forgoing borders, Florida.

However, in either case I don't personally believe it truly changes a northern state or southern state so much that they become part of the other region.
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