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Old 04-01-2012, 09:27 AM
 
40 posts, read 68,923 times
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Hello,
I will be relocating to Oklahoma to attend the University of Oklahoma's meteorology program......hopefully. I will be a non-traditional student; older than my classmates and most professors. I will be obtaining my surgical tech certification before moving to Oklahoma so I can enter the somewhat recession-proof health field. I have lived in NYC and Boston; cities with good public transit so I never had the need for a car. If I' am going to attend UofO, is it possible to live and work in OKC and attend school at UofO without the use of a car or should I live and work in Norman?
I' am also a musician, however I'm not expecting much in the way of an independent music scene in Oklahoma (at least compared to NYC) but I do like surprises (and with independent I don't mean hipster approved, corporate indie packages like Death Cab for Cutie, Flaming Lips, Arcade Fire, White Stripes etc. Independent as in pg.lost, Tortoise, Rachel's/Rachel Grimes, Lali Puna etc.) Is there a decent music scene out there?

Last edited by rocketsurgeon; 04-01-2012 at 09:44 AM..
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Old 04-01-2012, 05:43 PM
 
Location: The edge of the world and all of Western civilization
984 posts, read 1,092,469 times
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You will need a car. This is quite possibly the most car-dependent major city in the country. There's a bare bones bus system in OKC and Norman, and I believe a commuter bus from Norman to OKC... but I believe it's northbound-only in the mornings, southbound-only in the afternoon/evening. Norman has the CART, but even if you live in this town I can't imagine common things would be feasible without a car; e.g. grocery shopping, dining out, nightlife/venues, going to the doctor, etc.

Honestly, I don't know you well enough to say for sure if this would bother you or not, but for me, I live and work in Norman and loathe driving. I don't particularly like spending more than 20 minutes in a car, and the distance to OKC alone is enough of a deterrent to keep me from going there. You can look up the Oklahoma Gazette to see if anything looks appealing as far as music, and pay attention to where the things you see are located. That's the best I can say... prioritizing is up to you.
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Old 04-02-2012, 06:50 AM
 
40 posts, read 68,923 times
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Thank you for the response. I too absolutely hate driving; that's why I love NYC. I still have some time left here in the east coast before moving out to Oklahoma and with any luck the city/state budget in Oklahoma will include investing in mass transit. According to the numbers, I noticed a large percentage jump in population in OKC and this will hopefully help with the demand and funding of mass transit like it happened in Salt Lake City. Joining a band is not a priority: Work and school is though.
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Old 04-02-2012, 07:23 AM
 
Location: Edmond, OK
4,033 posts, read 10,211,569 times
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OKC is extremely spread out and while living here with out a car might be possible, it would be extremely difficult. I don't think there's any way you could live in and work in OKC and go to school at OU without one. I personally can't even imagine living, working and going to school in Norman without one, but then again, I've never lived anywhere where a car was not necessary, nor can I imagine having to live my life around some bus schedule. Even most of the largest cities here in the southwest (where I've always lived) are going to have limited mass transit. However, rather than just listening to what some random posters are saying, here are a couple of links to both the OKC transit and Norman area transit websites for you to check out: Home | METRO Transit Providing Central Oklahoma Transportation & Bus Service Options and Cleveland Area Rapid Transit (CART) - Norman, Oklahoma. Maybe it would work for you.

As for the music thing, I can't tell you much about that. The only thing I will mention is in reference to your comment about The Flaming Lips. I'm not sure if you're aware, but they are from OKC and still live here and still have a pretty visible presence in the city. There's even an alley in Bricktown named after them.
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Old 04-02-2012, 07:40 AM
 
40 posts, read 68,923 times
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Thank you for the links. I'll look at my options but it looks like I'am leaning towards Norman for convenience sake. No offense to Lips fans: I'am well aware that The Lips are from OKC. They're "pretty neat." I was holding a resentment towards Wayne because of what he allegedly said about Elliott Smith; which I found out today is untrue. My bad.
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Old 04-02-2012, 11:22 AM
 
Location: Deep Dirty South
5,190 posts, read 5,002,499 times
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I don't see how you'd make it without a car. I left Oklahoma a few years back but know Norman/OKC intimately.

Back in the day there was a couple of great punk scenes in OKC and Tulsa. Tulsa in particular has a lot of music history.

I don't know what to say...there are some pleasant things about Oklahoma living but it's not exactly a cultural mecca.
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Old 04-02-2012, 08:21 PM
 
Location: The edge of the world and all of Western civilization
984 posts, read 1,092,469 times
Reputation: 1688
Quote:
Originally Posted by rocketsurgeon View Post
Thank you for the response. I too absolutely hate driving; that's why I love NYC. I still have some time left here in the east coast before moving out to Oklahoma and with any luck the city/state budget in Oklahoma will include investing in mass transit. According to the numbers, I noticed a large percentage jump in population in OKC and this will hopefully help with the demand and funding of mass transit like it happened in Salt Lake City. Joining a band is not a priority: Work and school is though.
I used to live for a couple years in a city of about 25 million people, and the public transit was amazing. I just loved the lifestyle so much that I've been trying to get somewhere more built-up and less car-reliant ever since... but under circumstances I'll have to wait until next year before I can try to move on.

However, I will say that I wouldn't expect OKC to invest in mass transit anytime soon. Though it's automobile-dependent here, the roads aren't even in very good condition. Even the capitol is crumbling because they can't afford to maintain it. Add to that how spread out the area is and the lack of density... and I just don't think mass transit is going to expand here in the near future. Culturally, I think there might be resistance to developing it further, because people aren't quick to adopt new things and are comfortable with the car, and because of the tax hike necessary to fund it. I remember seeing somewhere that if you compare 2000-2010 numbers in Oklahoma's growth with that of combined metro OKC and metro Tulsa, the number you get from the latter actually exceeds the former. In other words, most (lest someone take that the wrong way) of the growth of both areas isn't people coming from elsewhere-- thus bringing in new ideas, freshness and ways to enrich the area with new perspectives-- but rather, people in rural parts of Oklahoma are moving into those metro areas.

In sum: if you want to attend OU, it's in your best interests to get a car... or see if OU has an online program you can do without moving.
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Old 04-02-2012, 11:30 PM
 
Location: Muncie, IN
588 posts, read 1,240,540 times
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Hi,

I am in the meteorology program myself. It's an incredibly difficult program to go to. Make 100% certain that it's what you want to do and make sure that you want to attend the hardest most prestige program in the country. It is not easy to get. Usually, classes start out at 120 students in freshman class, and they end up graduating 35-40 students, so most leave the program. I honestly don't see students just getting a meteorology degree here just for the heck of it. It has to be their passion, their dream, their desire to achieve a degree here. You can't just waltz in here and get a degree in meteorology here like most of the degrees at this university.

You better prepare yourself for some serious math courses. I don't know how much research you have done, but you have to go through all of calc, physical math, and another intense math course in senior year. On top of that, you must complete physics for engineers which isn't too bad. With all of that is the very math intensive courses in meteorology taught by some of the most difficult professors that expect the very best out of their students.

With that said, please please please don't make the mistakes that many students do and go into this program thinking its like any old degree. Its very difficult. You will live, eat, sleep, drink meteorology. It would be great if you had calc out of the way. I hope you have some good math skills. If you aren't 100% sure this is what you want to do, perhaps go to a university not as intensive and get a degree there. Undergrad doesn't matter quite as much (though a degree at OU in meteorology is well sought after). It's grad school that really counts. If you can afford it, go to in state and save some bucks. SUNY oswego has a great program! If you are ready for the painstaking hours in math and meteorology in a totally new environment, then go for it! The end result is great! Nothing beats a degree in meteorology at OU. I don't want to scare you. I just want to make you are prepared for this program. It's not like other meteorology programs...

So if you are ready for everything I said, then begin the trek out here. I am originally from California. It's quite a bit different. It's very conservative (not as much on campus, but the whole liberal college town is much less pronounced here). You will be asked to go to church with you buddies. Sometimes, that seems like the only way to make friends unless you are young and live on campus in the dorms. You will get close with some of your classamates, not at first, but probably in the second year when the math intensive part comes in. (This is where you live at the national weather center) There are several students that aren't your typical students. Some are older, some are out of the country. You will fit in fine.

You will want a car. Everybody has a car here. All the freshman have cars. It's expected to have a car. Oklahoma has some of the most pathetic public transportation I have ever seen. There is hardly anything. Thankfully, Norman is one of the select few areas with some public transportation. If you live next to campus, there is a small yet efficient bus service. The bus will go directly to the national weather center (where you take your classes). To get to any grocery stores, or any service places, you will most likely need a car. You might be able to get away with it, but it will be a huge hassle unlike New York or San Francisco (where I am from).

Oh one more thing, the grocery stores SUCK here. They are god awful. I don't know what you are used to, but 60% of the grocery market share is Walmart. Finally, OKC has invested in some good supermarkets like Whole foods and Sunflower farmers market, but they are decades behind. Norman is suppose to get their sunflower farmers market (wholefoodsie) in a year or so.

One of the great things about OK is that it's dirt cheap. Groceries especially for me. Even the gas is a bit cheaper. Finding an apartment is easy here, though it may be a little distance from the NWC as that is on the research part of campus, on the south side. There aren't a whole lot of apartments there. You could probably find a small one bed room for 400 bucks a mile or two from the NWC. Next to campus or near NWC, you might be able to find one for 450-500.

Oklahoma is a big change to what you are used to. It takes a bit of time to get used to, but as long as you have an open mind and are willing to try new things, it's great. I have come to enjoy it. If you have a car, Dallas is not too far away and that's a bigger city with a lot to do. OKC metro is having its time. It's becoming a city of it's own. There are jobs, people moving here, ect.

If you have any questions, don't hesitate to ask. You can PM me or ask on this thread.

Good luck,
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Old 04-07-2012, 03:36 PM
 
Location: Oklahoma City
242 posts, read 727,230 times
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There is a bus from downtown OKC to the OU campus which goes both directions 3 times in the morning and 3 times in the afternoon/evening. It is convenient if you live near the transit center in OKC but probably will still want to have a car unless you are an avid urban biker. In Norman, I would say it is probably a little more feasible to live without a car, if you live close to the OU campus where the bus routes converge and there is a car-sharing service. The area of Norman between campus and Main Street is walkable and has small-town style urbanity.

Art and creativity in general are taking off in the OKC metro right now. OKC and Norman both have a pretty good music scene (as do Tulsa and Stillwater) with lots of acts that are doing pretty well right now, including Other Lives (Stillwater) which has recently toured with (sorry, hipster-approved acts that have become masses-approved acts) Radiohead and Bon Iver. There is a "School of Rock" in downtown OKC that is growing really fast (about 500 students now) and producing a lot of young bands. Check out oklahomarock.com to get familiar with a lot of the local acts.
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Old 04-11-2012, 09:47 AM
 
Location: Norman
81 posts, read 238,836 times
Reputation: 82
I haven't seen this mentioned but the most CART buses have bicycle racks on the front of them. So if you ride a bus and take your bike with you can then zip around to other places on you bike.
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