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Old 05-19-2013, 01:45 AM
 
Location: Deep Dirty South
5,192 posts, read 4,721,423 times
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I don't feel you can really classify the entire state of Oklahoma as one homogenous entity as you can with a lot of other states. It's really more diverse in landscape and culture than I ever appreciated when I was younger.

None of this is scientific, but to my mind, Central OK including OKC is rather plains-like (even though it has been brought up here before that this region is officially "crosstimbers")--relatively flat, etc.

And yet the Southern Central parts of the state can get pretty lush (I'm thinking of Turner Falls/The Arbuckles down near Ardmore, etc.)

The further West outreaches of Oklahoma are more like the classic Western states with regards to terrain and climate. Think of the Black Mesa, the Wichitas...parts of Western OK aren't much different looking than the prototypical Desert Southwest.

The Eastern areas of the state are more Southern to me...Northeast OK is considerably different from Southeast OK however.

OKC was a cattle crossroads and Tulsa was oil barons. Tulsa itself is interesting because it has some hallmarks of Southern towns like the Plantation South--areas of Louisiana, Georgia, etc. but early on its culture, architecture, etc. was heavily influenced by nouveau-riche people from New England cities like Boston as well as Atlantic states locales such as Philadelphia.

Oklahoma can sure have some harsh weather--Winter and Summer both, and don't forget Tornado Season! It is certainly not the most diverse state culturally, politically, or with regards to religion, but topographically it has a great deal of beauty of all kinds. Even the stark, often desolate middle part of the state has its own style of beauty.

You can't truly, accurately say "Oklahoma IS... (Western, Southwestern, Midwestern, Southeastern, and so on)" because it is all of those things and something more as well.
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Old 05-19-2013, 02:15 AM
 
Location: Stillwater, Oklahoma
22,623 posts, read 16,023,319 times
Reputation: 6960
Well put. Thanks.
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Old 05-19-2013, 08:11 AM
 
Location: Oklahoma
11,682 posts, read 8,361,184 times
Reputation: 10501
Quote:
Originally Posted by Griffis View Post
I don't feel you can really classify the entire state of Oklahoma as one homogenous entity as you can with a lot of other states. It's really more diverse in landscape and culture than I ever appreciated when I was younger.

None of this is scientific, but to my mind, Central OK including OKC is rather plains-like (even though it has been brought up here before that this region is officially "crosstimbers")--relatively flat, etc.

And yet the Southern Central parts of the state can get pretty lush (I'm thinking of Turner Falls/The Arbuckles down near Ardmore, etc.)

The further West outreaches of Oklahoma are more like the classic Western states with regards to terrain and climate. Think of the Black Mesa, the Wichitas...parts of Western OK aren't much different looking than the prototypical Desert Southwest.

The Eastern areas of the state are more Southern to me...Northeast OK is considerably different from Southeast OK however.

OKC was a cattle crossroads and Tulsa was oil barons. Tulsa itself is interesting because it has some hallmarks of Southern towns like the Plantation South--areas of Louisiana, Georgia, etc. but early on its culture, architecture, etc. was heavily influenced by nouveau-riche people from New England cities like Boston as well as Atlantic states locales such as Philadelphia.

Oklahoma can sure have some harsh weather--Winter and Summer both, and don't forget Tornado Season! It is certainly not the most diverse state culturally, politically, or with regards to religion, but topographically it has a great deal of beauty of all kinds. Even the stark, often desolate middle part of the state has its own style of beauty.

You can't truly, accurately say "Oklahoma IS... (Western, Southwestern, Midwestern, Southeastern, and so on)" because it is all of those things and something more as well.
Yes, Tulsa was basically founded by the oil barons trying to stay across the river from the Glenn Pool riff raff that was pumping out their fortunes. Tulsa had money from the get go.

OTOH, OKC was a land run town that had to generate it's own wealth over time.
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Old 05-19-2013, 10:17 AM
 
498 posts, read 1,473,423 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by eddie gein View Post
OTOH, OKC was a land run town that had to generate it's own wealth over time.
Best summarized description of OKC I have heard to date. Accurate and hits the nail right on the head. Oklahoma City did strike oil in 1928 that brought more money to town, but it was never the same caliber as Tulsa. And today, Oklahoma City has become more white collar than blue collar, especially in the last six years.
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Old 05-19-2013, 12:29 PM
 
Location: Not where you ever lived
11,544 posts, read 27,487,117 times
Reputation: 6342
Oklahoma was Indian Territory before it became a state. Today OK is The Native State with more registered tribes than any other state else in the United States. Geophysically it is as easy to find the same types/kinds of trees, large bodies of water, towering cliffs, high rolling hills, sailboats and wildlife in NE Delaware County, OK that that is found in central Illinois. This is perhaps because the most eastern part of the state is also part of the Ozark Mountain Range. It is 50,000 acres that ends roughly s few short miles south of Fayetteville, AR and about 50 -75 miles west of the MO/OK border.

Talehquah, OK and Peoria, IL are both located on an Illinois River. The Mississippi River is the mother of both; and both are in the fowl Flyway zone. What this means is its most likely the same white pelicans that stop in the wetlands preserve outside of Peoria are the same pelicans that stop in Grove, Ok to feed on chad and rest for six weeks before they winter in Mexico. .

The Drive between the OK/MO border on 1-40 or 412 is beautiful. These routes were cut out of deep valleys, high hills and heavy natural forests. Tulsa is a green, leafy city from malls to residential streets. It's also a bit of a *four-face-oclock* city. It's nice to shop and not be too far from a large clock that is accurate within 5 minutes and that sometimes chimes.

Between I-44 and Tulsa, and where it joins I-40 there is a gradual change in the landscape that continues into Texas. The soil is more sandy and clay packed. and eventually becomes "red earth". The hills slowly flatten, as the once deep valleys rise, and heavily forested areas thin. Western Oklahoma, between the western outskirts of OKC and Texas, gradually change from modern steel and glass and heavy traffic to miles upon miles of sand and oil wells and the occasional isolated gas station or very small town.

Politics and religion are not good bedfellows which is why, other than national politics, Oklahomans tend to vote their mind. Its a good thing, and as a consequence you can find a Catholic Church that still offers Mass in Latin, just as as easily as one can find the Cowboy Church where hats, spurs, ropes and horses are optional, a church erected before statehood by a Principal Chief for his wife. It is still non-denominational, and still serves members and guests alike every Sunday.

There is no one word that describes all of Oklahoma and her people. It's sports; it's cowboys and cattle, it's gas and oil; it's forest and river; its museums and botanical parks; it's urban; it's isolated; it's upscale cuisine and down home BBQ. It may mimick others, but make no mistake Oklahoma is its brand.
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Old 06-23-2013, 06:41 PM
 
Location: Texas
324 posts, read 155,975 times
Reputation: 788
Southern and Western
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Old 06-23-2013, 06:52 PM
 
Location: IN
22,264 posts, read 38,863,111 times
Reputation: 14846
The Southwest.
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Old 06-29-2013, 08:32 PM
 
Location: Tulsa, OK
69 posts, read 113,188 times
Reputation: 47
Southwest.
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Old 12-20-2013, 01:01 AM
 
Location: NorCal by way of L.A. and Atlanta
96 posts, read 112,093 times
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OMI Oklahoma is more southern and western with some midwestern features though. When I rode on I-40 everything east of OKC was southern, but everything west of OKC is more western, and the only thing midwest about Oklahoma is probably the plains and flat land plus the tornadoes that roam through there. I always saw Oklahoma as a southwestern state just like Texas because eastern Texas is The South and western Texas is The West
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Old 12-20-2013, 03:23 AM
 
328 posts, read 527,385 times
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Oklahoma is so central it can be all three.

I tend to think of Oklahomans as "southerners" in terms of speech, food, music, religion, etc. I would bet most prominent Oklahomans, like Garth Brooks or Toby Keith are seen as "southerners."

Physically, its very similar to Kansas and the Midwest with its hot summers, stormy weather, and colder winters than the southeast.

Economically, it has more in common with the west: oil and gas, ranching. The strong Native American presence and growing Mexican American presence gives Oklahoma much in common with areas to the west. However, the west (aside from Utah) tends to be less religious.
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