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Old 12-26-2013, 03:31 PM
 
641 posts, read 893,634 times
Reputation: 864

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Its just a short jaunt up 71 or 44 to ST Louis or KCMO, and in either case I don't feel like much has changed at all from Tulsa. I do business with those people every day.

Now when I travel down into Louisiana, Mississippi or Alabama, it feels somewhat exotic, different.
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Old 12-31-2013, 10:04 AM
 
Location: Oklahoma City
374 posts, read 703,062 times
Reputation: 239
IMO there is nothing worse than someone from California referring to Oklahoma as the midwest.
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Old 12-31-2013, 10:06 AM
 
Location: Oklahoma City
374 posts, read 703,062 times
Reputation: 239
CHAPEL HILL – Ask even educated Americans what states form "the South," and you’re likely to get 100 different answers. Almost everyone will agree on Deep South states -- except maybe Florida -- but which border states belong and which don’t can be endlessly debated.
Now, the Southern Focus Poll, conducted by the Institute for Research in Social Science at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, provides strong support for including such states as Texas, Kentucky and Oklahoma in the South. On the other hand, West Virginia, Maryland, Missouri, Delaware and the District of Columbia don’t belong anymore, if they ever did.


Fourteen polls, surveying a total of more than 17,000 people between 1992 and 1999 show, for example, that only 7 percent of D.C. residents responding say that they live in the South.
Only 14 percent of Delaware residents think they live in the region, followed by Missourians with 23 percent, Marylanders with 40 percent and West Virginians with 45 percent.


"We found 84 percent of Texans, 82 percent of Virginians, 79 percent of Kentuckians and 69 percent of Oklahomans say they live in the South," says Dr. John Shelton Reed, director of the institute. "Our findings correspond to the traditional 13-state South as defined by the Gallup organization and others, but is different from the Census Bureau’s South, which doesn’t make sense."


The U.S. Census Bureau includes Delaware, D.C., Maryland and West Virginia in its definition.
"Clearly some parts of Texas aren’t Southern – whatever you mean by that -- and some parts of Maryland are," Reed said. "But sometimes you need to say what ‘the Southern states’ are, and this kind of information can help you decide. Our next step is to look inside individual states like Texas, break the data down by county, and say, for example, where between Beaumont and El Paso people stop telling you that you’re in the South."


A report on the findings, produced by UNC-CH’s Institute for Research in Social Science, will appear in the June issue of the journal "Southern Cultures." Reed, who directs the institute, says the results should interest many people including survey, marketing and census researchers.
"Personally, I think they ought to be interesting too to ordinary folk who are curious about where people stop telling you you’re in the South as you’re travelling west or north," he said. "Where that is has been kind of hard to say sometimes."


Perhaps surprisingly, 11 percent of people in Utah, 10 percent in Indiana and slighter fewer people in Illinois, Ohio, Arizona and Michigan claim to be Southerners.
"That’s because in the early part of this century millions of people left the South, and their migration was one of the great migrations not just in American history, but in world history," Reed said. "Their children may not think of themselves as Southern, but they still do."


The UNC-CH sociologist said he was surprised that 51 percent of Floridians describe themselves as Southerners even though 90 percent know their community is in the South.
"Florida is the only state in lower 48 where most people living there weren’t born there," he said. "In fact, most of them weren’t born in the South, much less in Florida."
Because of the South’s growing economy, only between 90 and 80 percent of residents of Mississippi, Louisiana, Alabama, Tennessee, Arkansas, Georgia and the Carolinas said they are Southerners, the surveys showed.


"If you want to define the South as where people say it is, now we have a better sense of it," Reed said. "For the most part, it confirms what I already suspected, which is why I’m glad to see it. This work shows something we wanted to show, but haven’t been able to before."


UNC-CH surveys reveal where the ‘real’ South lies


Sorry midwestern people. You are in the minority
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Old 12-31-2013, 12:25 PM
 
Location: OKIE-Ville
5,482 posts, read 8,278,600 times
Reputation: 3168
Quote:
Originally Posted by johnspecial View Post
CHAPEL HILL – Ask even educated Americans what states form "the South," and you’re likely to get 100 different answers. Almost everyone will agree on Deep South states -- except maybe Florida -- but which border states belong and which don’t can be endlessly debated.
Now, the Southern Focus Poll, conducted by the Institute for Research in Social Science at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, provides strong support for including such states as Texas, Kentucky and Oklahoma in the South. On the other hand, West Virginia, Maryland, Missouri, Delaware and the District of Columbia don’t belong anymore, if they ever did.


Fourteen polls, surveying a total of more than 17,000 people between 1992 and 1999 show, for example, that only 7 percent of D.C. residents responding say that they live in the South.
Only 14 percent of Delaware residents think they live in the region, followed by Missourians with 23 percent, Marylanders with 40 percent and West Virginians with 45 percent.


"We found 84 percent of Texans, 82 percent of Virginians, 79 percent of Kentuckians and 69 percent of Oklahomans say they live in the South," says Dr. John Shelton Reed, director of the institute. "Our findings correspond to the traditional 13-state South as defined by the Gallup organization and others, but is different from the Census Bureau’s South, which doesn’t make sense."


The U.S. Census Bureau includes Delaware, D.C., Maryland and West Virginia in its definition.
"Clearly some parts of Texas aren’t Southern – whatever you mean by that -- and some parts of Maryland are," Reed said. "But sometimes you need to say what ‘the Southern states’ are, and this kind of information can help you decide. Our next step is to look inside individual states like Texas, break the data down by county, and say, for example, where between Beaumont and El Paso people stop telling you that you’re in the South."


A report on the findings, produced by UNC-CH’s Institute for Research in Social Science, will appear in the June issue of the journal "Southern Cultures." Reed, who directs the institute, says the results should interest many people including survey, marketing and census researchers.
"Personally, I think they ought to be interesting too to ordinary folk who are curious about where people stop telling you you’re in the South as you’re travelling west or north," he said. "Where that is has been kind of hard to say sometimes."


Perhaps surprisingly, 11 percent of people in Utah, 10 percent in Indiana and slighter fewer people in Illinois, Ohio, Arizona and Michigan claim to be Southerners.
"That’s because in the early part of this century millions of people left the South, and their migration was one of the great migrations not just in American history, but in world history," Reed said. "Their children may not think of themselves as Southern, but they still do."


The UNC-CH sociologist said he was surprised that 51 percent of Floridians describe themselves as Southerners even though 90 percent know their community is in the South.
"Florida is the only state in lower 48 where most people living there weren’t born there," he said. "In fact, most of them weren’t born in the South, much less in Florida."
Because of the South’s growing economy, only between 90 and 80 percent of residents of Mississippi, Louisiana, Alabama, Tennessee, Arkansas, Georgia and the Carolinas said they are Southerners, the surveys showed.


"If you want to define the South as where people say it is, now we have a better sense of it," Reed said. "For the most part, it confirms what I already suspected, which is why I’m glad to see it. This work shows something we wanted to show, but haven’t been able to before."


UNC-CH surveys reveal where the ‘real’ South lies


Sorry midwestern people. You are in the minority
Don't use actual data in this dialogue. Apparently raw facts and research are not enough.
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Old 10-11-2017, 04:12 PM
 
Location: plano
7,488 posts, read 9,253,055 times
Reputation: 7177
Oklahoma doesn't feel very cohesive to me. I grew up in Durant. We identified with Texas more than Oklahoma. Dallas was twice as close as OKC. Si we rarely went to a city in OK but were in Dallas when we needed a city. Durant us now identified as part of extended DFW smsa. I niw live in DFW in Plano. I don't consider it southern at all but sw.okc and Tulsa seem like the Midwest to me. Western OK us definitely sw. I know little about okc or Tulsa. When I moved around the country with my job and mentioned I was from Oklahoma, it was like crickets no one asked me about it.

Our summer vacation growing up was visiting dad's parents in Tennessee. Now that was very different than Durant t OK me much more si than okc was. SE OK was called little Dixie but never made sense to me.

Truth is not many besides us Okies care but I would say Midwest if forced to out one label on the whole state.
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Old 10-11-2017, 05:20 PM
 
Location: The Republic of Gilead
11,908 posts, read 5,786,959 times
Reputation: 10301
I think Oklahoma is firmly within the Southern United States, similar in culture to much of Arkansas, Mississippi, and Alabama. There isn't much that is Midwestern or Southwestern about Oklahoma.
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Old 10-11-2017, 05:57 PM
 
Location: plano
7,488 posts, read 9,253,055 times
Reputation: 7177
Its nothing like the south. But you make my point we cant agree so its lost and has no strong identity.

The south is a history of tobacco and slaves none apply to SE Oklahoma in my experience. The slaves are the okies trying to farm the soil in ok with limited rain
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Old 10-12-2017, 09:32 PM
 
5,003 posts, read 14,391,399 times
Reputation: 2474
I'll put it to redt. We are just Indian Territory
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Old 10-12-2017, 11:59 PM
 
Location: Stillwater, Oklahoma
22,640 posts, read 16,036,051 times
Reputation: 6965
Quote:
Originally Posted by Johnhw2 View Post
Its nothing like the south. But you make my point we cant agree so its lost and has no strong identity.

The south is a history of tobacco and slaves none apply to SE Oklahoma in my experience. The slaves are the okies trying to farm the soil in ok with limited rain
I think Oklahoma has become closer aligned with the politics of the old south over the last decade. If I'm more right than I want to be, Fisher will get the nomination from Republicans to run as governor of Oklahoma next year. However, if Oklahoma is enough like the state of Louisiana, the Democrat will be the next governor of Oklahoma.
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Old 10-15-2017, 10:15 AM
 
Location: plano
7,488 posts, read 9,253,055 times
Reputation: 7177
My point is Oklahoma is not the same border to border. Durant where I grew up is called Little Dixie but its more like DFW than the south. DFW is a melting point now its not the south, Tyler may be but not dfw. Houston has larger southern pockets than DFW in my experience.

I find Tulsa and OKC to be very different from Durant.If thats your point I agree but its not true of Oklahoma as a whole
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