U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Covid-19 Information Page
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Oklahoma
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 03-02-2015, 01:35 PM
 
Location: Cushing OK
14,545 posts, read 18,207,281 times
Reputation: 16829

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by Griffis View Post
Oklahoma IS far more diverse in landscape/topography than most people think. I feel as though a lot of folks hear "Oklahoma" and they think "dustbowl." Just flat and characterless and brown everywhere.

While I like all of the different types of natural beauty and scenery in the state, something I feel should be mentioned are the skies. The sky here is so amazing and expansive. I have seen cloud formations that look like they belong in the atmosphere of an alien world. The sunrises and sunsets are like a gift. They can be so breathtaking, and so many colors...indescribable colors.

My wife and I were watching a sunset last week and it went from silver to gold to deep orange to hot pink to purple in minutes, all while the great "sky blue" behind and above it all shifted into different shades. Quite a show! The town we live in currently isn't the most pretty, and the area in which it's situated is not terribly scenic. But while watching that sunset, my wife said "You know, in Oklahoma if you happen to live in a place without the prettiest scenery, the amazing sky is what you get in place of it."

I have lived in every corner of this nation, from Minnesota to Texas and from the Atlantic Coast to the Pacific. I've seen many beautiful things and there are places in many other states I find beautiful, but as far as the actual sky goes--NO place I've lived has skies like the ones we get here. They call Montana "Big Sky Country" and many regions of Montana are indeed beautiful, but the skies there sure don't beat Oklahoma's.
I have a huge collection of sunset pictures now. I just wish the digitial camera would catch all the tones, and just may buy myself a better one with more pixles than the phone camera for really good ones. I love it when there are clouds, and as the sun sets the clouds reflect all the ranges of color. One time a friend and I decided to go look at intetersting places, and when we were driving home we were on a hill and you could virtually see that whole half of the sky in sunset, every tone of gold to red to everything inbetween. We stopped on the wide shoulder to just look and take pictures.

I have a large jumbo plastic crate full of wool embroidery yarn supplimented by other types you can use by splitting for stitchings, and it is currently my favorite hobby. What I'm thinking is a long piece of a sunset and a series of hills underneath. (I never use patterns, design them on my own). I'd love a wide and colorful piece on the wall of the beautiful skies.

Ironically, with the smog which smothered any sunset out in socal, the most striking sunset I ever took a picture of was during a major fire when we had fires burning on all sides, and the cinders were falling along with the air being smokey.

There are all kinds of beauty and you have to open your eyes to all of them.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 03-11-2015, 12:49 PM
 
Location: Jacksonville, FL
11,155 posts, read 14,694,093 times
Reputation: 7136
Also, I think it's very subjective when people assert that Tulsa has better scenery than OKC metro. In my opinion, both areas are scenically nice (based on browsing around on Google street view). And I've also driven through OK along I-35 the entire length, southbound. Not gonna lie -- it was a bit underwhelming after driving down from Denver, but it was during the winter when things were dead looking.

I like how Tulsa has low rise hills and higher density trees...kind of like what you see in parts of the northeastern U.S. Very pretty indeed. But I also like how central OK has a bigger sky and a farther, bigger horizon unobstructed by trees. And it still looks green, although maybe not quite as green as Tulsa and eastern OK.

The most ugly, non-scenic places I've been to in this country were places like Kennewick, WA and certain parts of central California (e.g. Bakersfield). Those places look very YELLOW, dusty and dirty. Not sure if anyone considers places like that to be scenic.

But in general, I think everywhere in the entire world has beautiful scenery. It's just a different kind of scenery, from place to place. Whether it's hills or flat terrain, brown or green, forested or bare, coniferous or deciduous, tropical or continental, I think everywhere has its own beauty.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-11-2015, 01:01 PM
 
Location: plano
6,921 posts, read 8,584,898 times
Reputation: 6275
I grew up in SE Oklahoma. The comments from some about the NE or green Oklahoma then labeling the rest as like western Oklahoma is misleading. SE Oklahoma is wild, remote and hilly as well as green. Lake Hugo in SE Oklahoma reportedly has enough water flowing over it's dam to handle NYCs needs several times over.

Growing in Durant, we felt as much like part of Texas as Oklahoma since OKC was twice as far as Dallas and Tulsa even further away.

I contend living near the Texas border in SE Ok you get the best of Oklahoma scenery combined wiTh the major city of Dallas. Best of my two favorite states.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-11-2015, 05:29 PM
 
Location: Jacksonville, FL
11,155 posts, read 14,694,093 times
Reputation: 7136
I have a question about OK scenery.

OK is in the Great Plains, and has a limited amount of forest and trees and lots of open grassland. But, was all of that openness manmade or natural? In other words, before humans settled in OK, was the entire state essentially a forest and then tons of trees were cleared out?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-11-2015, 10:58 PM
 
641 posts, read 842,291 times
Reputation: 864
Its natural. The crosstimbers is a vertical band of tough old stunted oaks that marks the boundary. There is a large region of forested hills in the east, which are not plains at all. Oklahoma is a very transitional place in almost every regard and gives people fits when they can't easily define it. Lots of wrong-headed debates here on this forum.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-12-2015, 11:56 AM
 
Location: Pawnee Nation
7,525 posts, read 15,201,056 times
Reputation: 7030
Oklahoma doesn't have a whole lot of tall "old growth" forests. Far eastern OK has some, but there are lots and lots of acres of scrub oaks. Post Oaks, Black Jack, etc are predominant.

Be careful about the comment "before humans........." Many of us have ancestors that were here 10,000 years ago.




https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8ZM4oKVXPe4
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-12-2015, 10:00 PM
 
25,699 posts, read 24,731,708 times
Reputation: 44301
Quote:
Originally Posted by _redbird_ View Post
You can see for a 100 miles. And if you stand on a phone book, you can see for 200 miles.
I agree, the rolling hills, the plains, its gorgeous there.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-12-2015, 10:05 PM
 
25,699 posts, read 24,731,708 times
Reputation: 44301
I think a lot of people profile OK as the 'tornado' state too, but geeze, give it a break, they don't happen every day in every town. Every state is going to have weather related issues. Heck AZ is dry desert and hot, dust storms, Calif gets quakes more often than OK gets tornadoes, the east coast gets hit with hurricanes, we just stay prepared for these things. I loved every visit there and wouldn't hesitate to live out there. Just sayin'.....
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-12-2015, 11:01 PM
 
Location: South/Central Florida
134 posts, read 201,249 times
Reputation: 103
Quote:
Originally Posted by wisconsin woman View Post
I think a lot of people profile OK as the 'tornado' state too, but geeze, give it a break, they don't happen every day in every town. Every state is going to have weather related issues. Heck AZ is dry desert and hot, dust storms, Calif gets quakes more often than OK gets tornadoes, the east coast gets hit with hurricanes, we just stay prepared for these things. I loved every visit there and wouldn't hesitate to live out there. Just sayin'.....
I think everyone associates Oklahoma with Tornadoes to. I live in Florida and we actually have the most Tornadoes per 10,000 miles or something like that. Most of our Tornadoes are EF0 and EF1 that are very short lived. I have never actually seen a Tornado at a close distance (I have tried) but have seen the funnel from several miles away. I can't even remember the last time my area was under a Tornado Warning. We have Hurricanes but we do not get hit as bad as most people think. I think 2005 was the last Hurricane to make landfall in Florida (Hurricane Wilma). I have lived here for about 25 years and have only been through 4-5 that have caused damage.

I would not hesitate to live in Oklahoma either. I love the scenery and I am also drawn to OK due to my Cherokee heritage on both sides of the family.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-12-2015, 11:16 PM
 
Location: Tulsa, OK
2,572 posts, read 3,633,360 times
Reputation: 2396
Quote:
Originally Posted by nep321 View Post
I have a question about OK scenery.

OK is in the Great Plains, and has a limited amount of forest and trees and lots of open grassland. But, was all of that openness manmade or natural? In other words, before humans settled in OK, was the entire state essentially a forest and then tons of trees were cleared out?
[/url]
[/url]

Not all of Oklahoma is flat.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:


Options
X
Data:
Loading data...
Based on 2000-2016 data
Loading data...

123
Hide US histogram


Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Oklahoma
Similar Threads
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

© 2005-2020, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top