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Old 05-17-2015, 03:47 PM
 
191 posts, read 169,375 times
Reputation: 312

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Has anybody else read this book? It was written in the 1980s by a man who had been an editor for the Washington Post.

In it, he suggests that the north American continent, including the islands of the Caribbean, are made up of nine separate and distinct "nations". He named them:

1. New England
2. Quebec
3. The Foundry
4. Dixie
5. The Breadbasket
6. The Empty Quarter
7. The Islands
8. Mex-America
9. Ecotopia

Some of these nations are natural allies (the Breadbasket and the Foundry), some are bitter enemies (Mex-America and Ecotopia) and many don't really have much to say tor about one another at all.

He describes the boundaries between nations , sometimes directly,
(the boundary between the Breadbasket and Dixie in Texas is a particular runway at DFW) and sometime whimsically (Connecticut leaves the Foundry and becomes New England at the point that more people are Red Sox, rather than Yankee, fans), and further describe in brief what the over arching attitude; the thing that makes one nation different than the next is (for example Mex-America is located in a region that lacks resources in the right place, so engineering feats like the California aqua-duct system, or the ability to air condition every single aspect of your life, are celebrated as not only good, but absolutely necessary, while Ecotopia (the only part of western North America with enough water) such things are considered near blasphemous.

For the record, Oklahoma, along with most of Alaska, Manhattan, NY, Washington DC and St. Louis, MO are listed as "Aberrations" meaning we don't fit the author's nation scheme.

Why is any of this relevant? Maybe it isn't really, but I have noticed lot of posts like "Is Virginia a Southern State?", which tends to be answered by the book (at least as things stood in 1980, when it was written). Also, and maybe more to the point, look at Lincx's post on Friendly Farming towns; he pointed out that most farming communities in OK are pretty doggone white; which happens to be one of the "characteristics" of the Breadbasket. Outside of military bases and big cities, it is so white that the folks there use Jews to discriminate against in terms of Country Club memberships and so forth.

I picked up this book way back to have something to read while I was waiting around to get an oil well logged, but I have found it really helpful to explain for example why certain political moves result in a sea change in peoples thought. If you can find a copy, I recommend it highly.
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Old 05-17-2015, 04:08 PM
 
Location: Not where you ever lived
11,544 posts, read 26,688,447 times
Reputation: 6300
Hi Skip! The book sounds interesting. I would probably like and argue a bit as farther was a foundryman in the Midwest for 60 years. But I digress.

I think you misread what I wrote. No harm; no foul.(;-)

1-in the Midwest (13 states including the Dakotas) most farming towns are predominately white.
2- In NE Oklahoma, which is in the foothills of the Ozark Mountain range, you are hard pressed to find easy land to manage due to the cliffs, steep hills and heavily forested areas.

I lived in NE OK for a long time.I would say I saw a lot more white ranchers than farmers. OK is an NDN state and believe me when I say some of our Native Americans families have been planters for 10000 years. I knew none who did not plant for their own use. A thousand acres? Probably not due to the great hills, high cliffs, mountains, and rock and clay that is buried deep in the foothills. Sometimes just setting a septic tank is a major obstacle to overcome. . .
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Old 05-17-2015, 04:49 PM
 
Location: USA
7,778 posts, read 10,543,829 times
Reputation: 11746
The book sounds like one I would like to read, so I've just ordered a copy from half.com for 4.24. It's a used paperback. Thought the library might have it, but no.
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Old 05-18-2015, 05:36 PM
 
Location: Not where you ever lived
11,544 posts, read 26,688,447 times
Reputation: 6300
Did you by chance check at the state library? They have many books the local libraries do not carry, but they can get it. At least they used to be able to find most things in the lending library system and deliver it to your home. I am going to check with my own lame library. Every time I go down there I wish in Oklahoma.



Quote:
Originally Posted by Rubi3 View Post
The book sounds like one I would like to read, so I've just ordered a copy from half.com for 4.24. It's a used paperback. Thought the library might have it, but no.
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Old 05-18-2015, 05:42 PM
 
Location: USA
7,778 posts, read 10,543,829 times
Reputation: 11746
Quote:
Originally Posted by linicx View Post
Did you by chance check at the state library? They have many books the local libraries do not carry, but they can get it. At least they used to be able to find most things in the lending library system and deliver it to your home. I am going to check with my own lame library. Every time I go down there I wish in Oklahoma.
I didn't, but I knew my library would try to get it for me, but when I saw it available at half.com I just went ahead and bought it. I know a couple of others who will want to read it.
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Old 05-22-2015, 12:01 PM
 
Location: Not where you ever lived
11,544 posts, read 26,688,447 times
Reputation: 6300
Awesome! What a great idea.


Quote:
Originally Posted by Rubi3 View Post
I didn't, but I knew my library would try to get it for me, but when I saw it available at half.com I just went ahead and bought it. I know a couple of others who will want to read it.
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