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Old 08-04-2016, 04:11 PM
 
Location: The State Of California
9,723 posts, read 12,828,285 times
Reputation: 3820

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Quote:
Originally Posted by SluggoF16 View Post
Tastings in Napa used to be free. About twenty years ago that changed. Now you need a roll of twenties just to try three half-ounce pours of wine that, while excellent, isn't much better than some of the up-and-coming states' wines, such as Colorado and Texas. (Except Highway 290 by Fredericksburg wineries are charging a boatload now... hint, go to the ones off that highway. Or go to Grand Junction, CO, was there in October, almost every winery is free.) Some Okie wineries are charging a nominal fee but often cancel it if you buy a bottle, and several Oklahoma wineries are starting to make some very good wines, which is a real challenge given the weather in this state. A friend of mine in the Chandler-Stroud area made exceptional sauvignon blanc but had to close his winery a few years back after the big freeze of 2011.

Map of Oklahoma wineries

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I didn't know diddity squat about Oklahoma Wineries......what a revelation SluggoF16
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Old 08-04-2016, 05:31 PM
 
Location: SW OK (AZ Native)
18,132 posts, read 8,151,880 times
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There are several obstacles to the Oklahoma wine "industry". #1 is Sally Kern, and her ilk. #2 is the monopoly regarding the distribution of wine in this state, a throwback to #1. #3 is something no one can do anything about, though they complain about it (re: Charles Dudley Warner, not Mark Twain) and that's the weather, specifically humidity, but also hail, ice, drenching rain, drought (which actually can help), tornadoes, and all those other fun things Oklahoma weather is known for. #4 is the soil... in some places it's too good, too well-drained and too rich; grapes hate that. Well, they don't but they get fat and tasteless and overproduce - like some people - and make "thin" wine. #5 is farmers' use of 2-4D... it once killed most of a vineyard of a winemaker I know in Texas.

The Oklahoma taste, like that of the South, is for sweeter, less "grown-up" wines. Which, despite my allegedly sophisticated palate, is also OK by me. A great Sonoma pinot noir or Napa cab blend makes me happy, but so does $6 Arkansas screw cap muscadine in a red Solo cup. It's easy to make a sweet wine by chaptalizing it, that is, adding some sugar, or not fermenting it as long and keeping sugar in it. Which makes it less dry and again that's OK by me, but not very pleasing to wine snobs. Or at least that's what they say. My sister is a wine snob; she works as the assistant winemaker at a California winery, but secretly admits she has a thing for Catawba wine from Indiana.
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Old 08-04-2016, 09:32 PM
 
Location: OKIE-Ville
5,451 posts, read 7,975,450 times
Reputation: 3109
Quote:
Originally Posted by SluggoF16 View Post
There are several obstacles to the Oklahoma wine "industry". #1 is Sally Kern, and her ilk. #2 is the monopoly regarding the distribution of wine in this state, a throwback to #1. #3 is something no one can do anything about, though they complain about it (re: Charles Dudley Warner, not Mark Twain) and that's the weather, specifically humidity, but also hail, ice, drenching rain, drought (which actually can help), tornadoes, and all those other fun things Oklahoma weather is known for. #4 is the soil... in some places it's too good, too well-drained and too rich; grapes hate that. Well, they don't but they get fat and tasteless and overproduce - like some people - and make "thin" wine. #5 is farmers' use of 2-4D... it once killed most of a vineyard of a winemaker I know in Texas.

The Oklahoma taste, like that of the South, is for sweeter, less "grown-up" wines. Which, despite my allegedly sophisticated palate, is also OK by me. A great Sonoma pinot noir or Napa cab blend makes me happy, but so does $6 Arkansas screw cap muscadine in a red Solo cup. It's easy to make a sweet wine by chaptalizing it, that is, adding some sugar, or not fermenting it as long and keeping sugar in it. Which makes it less dry and again that's OK by me, but not very pleasing to wine snobs. Or at least that's what they say. My sister is a wine snob; she works as the assistant winemaker at a California winery, but secretly admits she has a thing for Catawba wine from Indiana.
Good info.

As for me, hell, I'll drink the stuff out of the box if I'm desperate enough. No need for me fighting my Redneck heritage.

As for distilleries, the OP could have stopped by my uncle's house in Southern Oklahoma. My uncle has been making homemade wine for over sixty years. He kept it in a small cistern behind his fridge. No wine snobbery in my family.
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Old 08-05-2016, 05:34 AM
 
Location: SW OK (AZ Native)
18,132 posts, read 8,151,880 times
Reputation: 7673
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bass&Catfish2008 View Post
Good info.

As for me, hell, I'll drink the stuff out of the box if I'm desperate enough. No need for me fighting my Redneck heritage.

As for distilleries, the OP could have stopped by my uncle's house in Southern Oklahoma. My uncle has been making homemade wine for over sixty years. He kept it in a small cistern behind his fridge. No wine snobbery in my family.
One of the differences between the mega-wineries of the West Coast and upstate NY and the Okie wineries (and to a lesser extent the smaller Texas wineries), or for that matter the Oklahoma breweries and distilleries, is the person pouring the wine (in the case of a tasting room) was likely the same one who made it. Very roots-driven production, and I like that.
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Old 08-05-2016, 03:46 PM
 
1,501 posts, read 1,165,134 times
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There's plenty of distilleries in eastern, OK. Just go up in the mountains and ask the local about distilleries. They call them "stills" for short. Should make for a interesting trip.
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Old 08-05-2016, 04:05 PM
 
657 posts, read 531,867 times
Reputation: 944
There are some distilleries scattered around the southeastern Oklahoma mountains, but I don't think visitors would be welcomed.

http://www.nationalvietnamveteransfo...statistics.htm
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