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Old 11-23-2016, 12:14 PM
 
106 posts, read 96,626 times
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I lived in Oklahoma for the first 40 years of my life, then moved to NE Indiana in 2012 to be with my fiancé. We are thinking of moving back to Oklahoma because I want our 4-year-old son to be near his grandparents and plus the security of being back in my home state. My fiancé is getting along in years and he wants us to be in a place where me and our son can feel secure after he is gone. The only thing that concerns me is the apparent apathy and ineptedness of the Oklahoma state government, especially in regards to K-12 education and infrastructure, among other things. Any advice would be good...

Last edited by janedoe1972; 11-23-2016 at 12:22 PM..
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Old 11-23-2016, 03:58 PM
 
Location: United States of Jerry Falwell
11,415 posts, read 5,038,465 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by janedoe1972 View Post
I lived in Oklahoma for the first 40 years of my life, then moved to NE Indiana in 2012 to be with my fiancé. We are thinking of moving back to Oklahoma because I want our 4-year-old son to be near his grandparents and plus the security of being back in my home state. My fiancé is getting along in years and he wants us to be in a place where me and our son can feel secure after he is gone. The only thing that concerns me is the apparent apathy and ineptedness of the Oklahoma state government, especially in regards to K-12 education and infrastructure, among other things. Any advice would be good...
What are your political leanings? Also, what would make you feel more secure in Oklahoma moreso than where you are now?

Oklahoma can be very frustrating if you aren't conservative, which you are probably aware if you lived here for 40 years. I moved back to Oklahoma, approaching it in a very objective manner, but the conservative culture here really gets under my skin a lot of the time. Not just the legislature, but the amount of support they get and the fact they get re-elected time and time again because Jesus when in fact they are screwing everybody over. K-12 education, infrastructure, and earthquakes are just a few of the ways they are doing that. Since you mention the legislature and their ineptedness as a concern, I would evaluate how much of a concern it actually is to you. You can't put a price on family, but you also have to decide whether being near family is worth the negatives if you moved back here. I moved back primarily because of family but my relationship with them has actually gone downhill since I've been back.
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Old 11-23-2016, 04:22 PM
 
Location: Stillwater, Oklahoma
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Quote:
Originally Posted by janedoe1972 View Post
I lived in Oklahoma for the first 40 years of my life, then moved to NE Indiana in 2012 to be with my fiancé. We are thinking of moving back to Oklahoma because I want our 4-year-old son to be near his grandparents and plus the security of being back in my home state. My fiancé is getting along in years and he wants us to be in a place where me and our son can feel secure after he is gone. The only thing that concerns me is the apparent apathy and ineptedness of the Oklahoma state government, especially in regards to K-12 education and infrastructure, among other things. Any advice would be good...
Talking about security, I certainly would advise staying away from the earthquake prone areas of Oklahoma. You don't need the daily stress of worrying about when the next big one happens. It's a bad enough position for adults to be in, let alone a 4 year old child. Tulsa, the southeast, southwest parts and northeast parts of the state may be far enough away from the earthquakes not to be frightened by them too much and suffering damage. The earthquakes weren't worrying me all that much, until I went through the rapid shaking of the record breaking 5.8 Pawnee earthquake. I sure don't want them to get stronger than that. Scientists can't guarantee they won't.

The conservative political culture here tends to be pretty toxic unless you're well off. The Oklahoma Legislature is dedicated to making the already well off more so. Most everybody else is expected to do a better job of lifting themselves up by the boot straps.

Last edited by StillwaterTownie; 11-23-2016 at 05:10 PM..
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Old 11-23-2016, 04:34 PM
 
Location: Oklahoma
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I can't imagine that Oklahoma would be much different than what you remember it being like. Except for maybe the earthquakes.

As far as schools go, the schools are woefully underfunded but that doesn't mean there aren't some good schools in the state. Mostly places that have some sort of corporate tax base (Power plant in the district etc). It would help to know what part of Oklahoma you are wanting to come back to to really advice you on that stuff.
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Old 11-24-2016, 07:26 AM
 
Location: plano
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OP where in Oklahoma are you considering returning? I think things varies somewhat by area of the state.
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Old 11-24-2016, 04:14 PM
 
Location: Cushing OK
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I'm considering moving out, when my son gets settled in the new house they're buying. That's in Utah. Since we've been getting multiple 5.quakes, and the houses here are old, it sounds like a good time to get closer. I live in Cushing. I would avoid the area in central OK where the quakes are occuring, and around Stillwater/Cushing area especially. The buildings here can only take so much shaking and they will all start showing bad damage.

I agree with Stillwater Townie that you should look in the areas NOT currently under the redzone warning. I'd also consider the cost of insurence when you buy since even without quake riders its going up considerably. Check first to see if you can get it at all, or within reasonable cost.
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Old 11-24-2016, 07:55 PM
 
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In fact, I was looking at Stillwater or Norman...however, I would rather live above a major fault line than in a place that is Ground Zero for monster tornadoes (I.e., Moore).
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Old 11-24-2016, 09:44 PM
 
Location: Stillwater, Oklahoma
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Originally Posted by janedoe1972 View Post
In fact, I was looking at Stillwater or Norman...however, I would rather live above a major fault line than in a place that is Ground Zero for monster tornadoes (I.e., Moore).
Norman is safer from the earthquakes. People there can live with greater peace of mind. Unlike Stillwater, the centers of the earthquakes haven't ventured near Norman. In Stillwater, we worry every day if a 5.0 or worse earthquake is going to happen close enough to town to cause damage like what happened in Cushing and Pawnee. Since there doesn't seem to be a season for earthquakes, like there is for tornadoes, I'd say the earthquake worry is worse, especially this time of year. But then, on the other hand, damage from a F-5 tornado is would be worse than from a magnitude 5.0 earthquake.
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Old 11-25-2016, 02:53 AM
 
Location: Cushing OK
14,545 posts, read 18,207,281 times
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Originally Posted by StillwaterTownie View Post
Norman is safer from the earthquakes. People there can live with greater peace of mind. Unlike Stillwater, the centers of the earthquakes haven't ventured near Norman. In Stillwater, we worry every day if a 5.0 or worse earthquake is going to happen close enough to town to cause damage like what happened in Cushing and Pawnee. Since there doesn't seem to be a season for earthquakes, like there is for tornadoes, I'd say the earthquake worry is worse, especially this time of year. But then, on the other hand, damage from a F-5 tornado is would be worse than from a magnitude 5.0 earthquake.
A quake large enough to produce major damage would, in this area, cause massive damage here given the number of old and non-earthquake resistant buildings. Look at downtown Cushing, and other downtowns may face the same. I'm not an expert on tornados, but wouldn't it heavily damage one area and leave the area next to it alone. Quakes aren't going to do that. The total amount of damage could be greater because quakes aren't selective about what block they knock down.

The epicenter of the Cushing quake was only one mile from my house. I couldn't get out the door it was shaking so hard and hung onto an easychair. After I realized the only hanging object, a ceiling fan, was right above me. And then there was the one a few months ago on a weekend. I remember I was in bed asleep, and woke up to the bed moving back and forth. For some reason I decided to get out of the room and could hardly stand. Power went out for a while with both.

Back in California, we all knew the Big One was coming. Or, one of them given the number of faults. But buildings are built to withstand quakes, to move without crumbling. Before I moved, the buildings grandfathered out had come under regulation as well. I'd say its time for Oklahoma to insist on building standards especially for homes and schools. The California standards are used world wide in quake prone areas. It doesn't guarentee you anything, but it gives you a better chance. And also educate people about the ways to minimize potential damage, like afixing shelves firmly to a wall, and have tall items attached as well. And never ever ever put shelves over a bed unless the only thing which goes on it are stuffed animals.

I will admit to being really scared of tornados, but then there's no shelter and the best place inside is still not that good. At least they don't sneek up on you. I'm sitting there watching the radar when there's storms. Lately, with the quakes, there has been a small 'warning'. There's a noise, and just a small movement, then whamo. Hold on and hopefully there's nothing to fall directly on you.

Just sitting here, had a small 'slip' and the house shook. Waiting for the rest...
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