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Old 07-19-2017, 01:04 PM
 
657 posts, read 531,755 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Versatile View Post
Thanks. I wil stop by there sometime.
The article is from the Daily Oklahoman of Sep. 18, 1921 (Vol. 32, number 346). The article takes up all of the front page of Section B and is titled "Preserving Oklahoma Wildlife". It also deals with other state refuges, such as the Wichita Mountains. The first twenty sections of land were acquired from the federal government in 1916 but it included no year-round water sources so "two years ago" 2,330 more acres were purchased from their New York owner, and this included 1.5 miles of frontage along Mountain Fork. It says that a 26-mile fence was "just completed", at a cost of $10,000. It was six strands of wire and six feet tall. A home for the superintendent was also built.

At the time of the article there were hundreds of turkeys and an estimated 500 deer on the preserve.
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Old 07-20-2017, 08:23 AM
 
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You made a good hit! Thanks. I would think your article is correct and this one is wrong.

McCurtain County Wilderness Area | The Encyclopedia of Oklahoma History and Culture

In the 1930s the Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC) maintained a camp in the area, and the Works Progress Administration (WPA) built projects, including a low-water bridge across the Upper Mountain Fork River, and installed more than twenty-four miles of high boundary fence.

Compare this purchase to yours.

Born through the efforts of the 1918 Oklahoma Legislature to keep the area in a primal state, officials purchased the entire acreage from twenty sections of American Indian land at approximately $6.13 per acre.

Six strands of barb wire 6ft tall wold only keep out horses,cows or humans.

Why all the information differences? This whole thing doesn't pass my smell test. There is morethan has been told.
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Old 07-27-2017, 09:45 AM
 
Location: New Mexico U.S.A.
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Originally Posted by Versatile View Post
Hello, Any one have any history on this legislator?

William H. Harrison Dem McCurtain
Quote:
WILLIAM H. HARRISON

Born September 26, 1853, married to Scerild Jane McCaslin January 26, 1878, a white woman born in Springfield, Missouri. To this union twelve children were born, six of whom are living Ida, Etta, Mable, Victor Van, Guy, and Vivian. In 1888 elected sheriff of Atoka County, serving two years. In 1890 and 1891 elected representative to the Choctaw Council from said county. District Royalty collector for two years, and National Agent of the Choctaw Nation for two years. Served as Deputy United States Marshal for Western District of Arkansas, and later as Deputy United States Marshal for Eastern District of Texas when said districts had jurisdiction over the Choctaw Nation. Later was United States Marshal under J. J. McAlester, Central District of Indian Territory and United States Indian Police from 1885 to 1889. Elected to the House of the Choctaw Council in 1902 and served as speaker of the house. He was United States land appraiser in the appraisement of the lands of the Choctaw Nation. Died June 7, 1919, at his home in Durant, and buried at Atoka, Oklahoma.
Continues On At: Chronicles of Oklahoma
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Old 07-27-2017, 09:55 AM
 
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Thanks. I still wonder why they would build a fence that anyone knows won't keep in a deer? I have been on the east side of the Wilderness area and the only fence remmants are 5-6 starnd of barb wire on about 4-5 ft wooden post and it looks from the 20's.

There is a lot more to this Wilderness area than is being told.
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Old 07-27-2017, 02:24 PM
 
657 posts, read 531,755 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Versatile View Post
Thanks. I still wonder why they would build a fence that anyone knows won't keep in a deer? I have been on the east side of the Wilderness area and the only fence remmants are 5-6 starnd of barb wire on about 4-5 ft wooden post and it looks from the 20's.

There is a lot more to this Wilderness area than is being told.
My guess is it was to keep out trespass livestock.
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Old 07-28-2017, 07:40 AM
 
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$10,000.00 Back in the 20's is equal to about $142k. That money back then would have purchased about 3,200 cows. That is some very rugged terrain and other than the Union Trail Trace Road ; ther just were hardly any roads or inhabitants. (and) cattle. I think you could have drawn a circle of 50 miles and not found 3,200 cows. The population of the cty was under a 1000 people.

Thus i say why are there documents in a museum proving this happened in he 20's and Oklahoma Historical Societies say it was in the 30's by the CCC Camps? Over the years since 2004 i have read several different acre amounts.
The east side of the Wilderness area is not even marked with signs.
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Old 07-28-2017, 09:49 AM
 
657 posts, read 531,755 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Versatile View Post
$10,000.00 Back in the 20's is equal to about $142k. That money back then would have purchased about 3,200 cows. That is some very rugged terrain and other than the Union Trail Trace Road ; ther just were hardly any roads or inhabitants. (and) cattle. I think you could have drawn a circle of 50 miles and not found 3,200 cows. The population of the cty was under a 1000 people.

Thus i say why are there documents in a museum proving this happened in he 20's and Oklahoma Historical Societies say it was in the 30's by the CCC Camps? Over the years since 2004 i have read several different acre amounts.
The east side of the Wilderness area is not even marked with signs.
No, the population of McCurtain County was much higher in 1920 than at the latest census (37,905 and 33,151, respectively) and the area would have been overrun with free ranging cattle since before statehood.
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Old 07-28-2017, 11:10 AM
 
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Originally Posted by deb100 View Post
No, the population of McCurtain County was much higher in 1920 than at the latest census (37,905 and 33,151, respectively) and the area would have been overrun with free ranging cattle since before statehood.
Thanks for catching my mistake. "The population of the cty was under a 1000 people." I think i crossed the cty with Idabell.
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Old 07-28-2017, 12:16 PM
 
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With a large rural population depending entirely on subsistence farming and logging, using the most primitive practices and with no thought given to conservation, it is a wonder that any deer survived in the wild. The mountains of southeast Oklahoma were probably the last place in the state there were any at all left by that time. In addition to each family having its herd of wild-roaming razorback hogs uprooting vegetation and destroying wildlife habitat, the mountain areas were used as free range by cattle owners. I have read accounts of a single family that had herds that were tended by cowboys, known as range riders, who lived in camps that were scattered over a distance of 75 miles.
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Old 07-28-2017, 01:49 PM
 
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Have been reading that with barb wire arriving in 1870 that is when they outlawed free range cattle but it continued in eastern oklahoma for some time afterwards. McCurtain county has some very steep twisted rocky terrain. Hard scrabble life for sure.

I spoke to a relative that caught hogs for people for .25 each. This was in Izard cty Ar but sure not much difference in the terrain other than McURTAIN CTY has steep Mts but life was close. I had a great uncle and his family that went from Calico Rock Ar to ADA Ok by wagon with mules and it took 27 days.
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