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Old 12-10-2017, 03:59 PM
 
Location: East Oak Lan
62 posts, read 37,981 times
Reputation: 160

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Are you willing to downsize in your new city? Maybe start with a small apartment or studio. Are you ok with that? That may enable you to move, with a job, and manage your car payment. Also, are you saving? I'm assuming you are smart enough to do so. Save more aggressively. You are getting to an age where you need to live and be happy for you. Its sets the stage for everything else. If you wait longer, you may get comfortable or accept your fate. I have seen people get too comfortable and complacent. By the time they finally snap out of it, its twice as hard to make changes. You are 32! Gonna blink and be 35, 36 and it may get worse.

 
Old 12-10-2017, 04:07 PM
 
Location: 49th parallel
2,993 posts, read 1,599,969 times
Reputation: 6229
I would word my resume very carefully. If you are really interested in something you see out there, job-wise, you can state that you are moving to that area in X month. Obviously, the statement will become true if you get the job. The employer is then off the hook to move you and can consider you "local."

I did that some years ago (but I actually WAS moving to that state) but the end result was the same. I got considered as a "local" hire.
 
Old 12-10-2017, 05:00 PM
 
Location: United States of Jerry Falwell
11,415 posts, read 5,038,465 times
Reputation: 9280
Quote:
Originally Posted by Shazzy1228 View Post
Are you willing to downsize in your new city? Maybe start with a small apartment or studio. Are you ok with that? That may enable you to move, with a job, and manage your car payment. Also, are you saving? I'm assuming you are smart enough to do so. Save more aggressively. You are getting to an age where you need to live and be happy for you. Its sets the stage for everything else. If you wait longer, you may get comfortable or accept your fate. I have seen people get too comfortable and complacent. By the time they finally snap out of it, its twice as hard to make changes. You are 32! Gonna blink and be 35, 36 and it may get worse.
I am currently living in a studio even here so I can't really downsize much. If I could move with a job making at least what I am making here, I could move. I could not take a cut however and still afford my car.

As far as saving, I am saving what I can but most of my disposable income goes towards this car.

And I totally agree that the longer I wait, the more difficult it will be. That's a scary thing because this already seems much, much more difficult than it was when I was 22 and I moved away the first time. I really cannot believe I moved back and I still have a hard time accepting it. I would say "comfortable and complacent yet miserable" has been the story of my life these past five years. I look at things I did back when I was 22 and couldn't see myself taking the same kind of risks today.
 
Old 12-10-2017, 07:06 PM
 
5,296 posts, read 2,290,678 times
Reputation: 10499
Quote:
Originally Posted by bawac34618 View Post
I am currently living in a studio even here so I can't really downsize much. If I could move with a job making at least what I am making here, I could move. I could not take a cut however and still afford my car.

As far as saving, I am saving what I can but most of my disposable income goes towards this car.

And I totally agree that the longer I wait, the more difficult it will be. That's a scary thing because this already seems much, much more difficult than it was when I was 22 and I moved away the first time. I really cannot believe I moved back and I still have a hard time accepting it. I would say "comfortable and complacent yet miserable" has been the story of my life these past five years. I look at things I did back when I was 22 and couldn't see myself taking the same kind of risks today.
Why are you still underwater with a 3-4 year old car and $8K in savings? You really should be using some of that money so if something happens to the car, you are not underwater with it. Put some of that money to paying down the car! I can’t imagine that you have many years left on the payments at this point and should be able to pay it off quickly. If you can pay it off even more quickly with some of that savings, it is worth it to do it.

Then you can start looking at cities that are relatively nearby- Dallas, for example, or KC. Those wouldn’t be all that expensive for a move and you wouldn’t need as much savings as you’d need to move to Miami or Los Angeles. When I was looking to move, I tried to keep it in a certain area because I knew it would just get too expensive if I was trying to go to the opposite coast, for example. Focusing on jobs that are nearby will also give you a better shot at interviews because they’re more likely to interview people who can at least drive for an in-person interview.
 
Old 12-10-2017, 08:51 PM
 
Location: East Oak Lan
62 posts, read 37,981 times
Reputation: 160
I agree about using some of the savings towards this car. Appears to be eating too much from your budget. What industry are in btw? Is it in-demand?OP would probably be better off in Dallas from what I have been reading about DFW area these days. It is, however, getting expensive due to the influx of people relocating. If he considers there, gotta get rid of these car payments.
OP, is there anything else eating your budget big time besides the car??
 
Old 12-11-2017, 04:24 AM
 
5,688 posts, read 6,216,507 times
Reputation: 4452
Quote:
Originally Posted by Shazzy1228 View Post
Are you willing to downsize in your new city? Maybe start with a small apartment or studio. Are you ok with that? That may enable you to move, with a job, and manage your car payment. Also, are you saving? I'm assuming you are smart enough to do so. Save more aggressively. You are getting to an age where you need to live and be happy for you. Its sets the stage for everything else. If you wait longer, you may get comfortable or accept your fate. I have seen people get too comfortable and complacent. By the time they finally snap out of it, its twice as hard to make changes. You are 32! Gonna blink and be 35, 36 and it may get worse.
I agree.
 
Old 12-11-2017, 07:41 AM
 
760 posts, read 427,180 times
Reputation: 2925
I was in your situation once. I wanted to move to another state but did not have a job lined up because the kind of work I did - employers would not consider even interviewing someone that wasn't a local. I also had a car payment, not a lot of money in the bank, AND 2 pets to take with me.

I saved up enough to make 1 month's car payment in advance, and combined that with taking a 1 month "payment holiday" from the loan. The credit unions where I've had car loans offered this skip a payment one time a year, usually in the summer or at the end of the year. No car payment, but you did accrue the interest during that month ($5). If your loan holder will do this, it could be your ace in the hole. So then I had 2 months of no car payments when I moved. This was essential to my plan because no way could I afford the car payments during the move.

Then when I hit the ground in the new city, I started working for temp agencies who got me work immediately. I signed up with more than one to increase the temp opportunities coming in. I made it clear that my focus was temp to perm type jobs, tho I was willing to take anything at that time to get some money coming in.

I worked that temp job for 2 weeks while applying for jobs on my own. Within 2 weeks, I landed a permanent job on my own and left the temp world behind. But that temp job was like gold to me as it allowed a steady income while I did my job search though I did live without health insurance for a couple of months during the transition. One of several gambles I made in doing this whole move. But I was young and healthy (and maybe a little stupid), and was willing to take the risk to get what I wanted.

Now, I will say that I had a place to land with a relative, but I moved out in two weeks into a condo when I got my job. So within two weeks - I was all set. Job and place to live. But having that place to land was a huge benefit that you may not have. There are ways around this but it requires some fancy footwork on your part. More challenging, but can be done.

Even though I had a job and a place of my own, it still felt a bit risky cuz who knows if that job was going to work out? I just made up my mind to make it work no matter what I had to do.

I was full of dogged determination and youthful stubbornness that I was going to do this thing come hell or high water. You will need this also if you're going on this same journey because it's a leap of faith in the end and requires stamina, resourcefulness, and quick thinking on your part.
 
Old 12-11-2017, 09:04 AM
 
Location: Dallas, TX and Las Vegas, NV
6,207 posts, read 4,981,107 times
Reputation: 13516
I think this has been posted before. Dallas is pretty close and with a vibrant job market. Its always an advantage to be a local candidate. You could easily drive down for a job interview within a short time. Use a DFW address on your resume. You might put 2 addresses. Dallas address and OKC address. Maybe get a new cell phone number for job search — maybe buy a burner phone — with a 972 area code (or something local to Dallas)...or not. There are plenty of places you can rent a local address and have mail forwarded to you from. Or you can just pick an address...in a big apartment complex in the Uptown area. These days, job recruiters will contact you by phoning or emailing....so if you have a Dallas address on your resume its highly unlikely they will ever mail you anything anyway. If you get hired, no one will notice you’ll use an address when you sign up as a new employee that’s diff from your resume address. Perhaps you might select an address in the uptown area that has very reasonable rents and a place you’d actually want to live.

If you want to do a job search this way, it might be a good approach to be somewhat deceptive about your motive. Recruiters are pretty receptive to people relocating for compelling reasons. “I hate OKC” is not likely to be a compelling reason. When contacted by a recruiter, you’ll be asked about working in OKC but having a DFW address. Just say you have a place in both, that your family lives in OKC and you work there, but your significant other lives in Dallas so you commute between the cities and you very much want to settle in Dallas. This is also an approach that helps you easily discuss your present job that is going very well. Also, if you are asked to come in for an interview simply say you are in OKC at work and will be back in town next week and set up a time for then.
 
Old 12-11-2017, 09:26 AM
 
11,994 posts, read 9,370,220 times
Reputation: 30737
You aren't required to put your address on your resume. Name, email, and phone number will suffice. Apply and be prepared to drive or fly on your own dime unless it's a job important enough to offer relocation.
 
Old 12-11-2017, 10:37 AM
 
Location: Miami-Jax
6,762 posts, read 7,484,153 times
Reputation: 3841
I can empathize with you, as I'm the same age, left a similar home town the same time you did, and returned to a similar situation in '09 where I was satisfied and in a practical spot (job, family, network all strong) but longing to be back in a big city. Like you, I stuck around and never made the jump and I really regret it. But for me there were two different factors at play...for one, Jax was only my base and I was on the road between 30 and 40% of the time. Secondly, I had the resources and the opportunity to leave so that's what really is the basis for my regret. If I were in your shoes it's possible I'd feel differently. I guess there's a third difference between us, and that is that I really like Jax a lot. It has many obvious shortcomings, but I love the city, got very involved, and rooted passionately for its progress. So while on one hand I'm sure I could have had more excitement somewhere else in my late 20s, I also don't see it as a blackhole of lost time at all.

Anyway, I just offered my background to provide color for my comments. I feel for ya, and I really think you should do your best to get out if it's just not for you. I don't think you have to be quite so methodical and cautious...you can afford to take a risk cause this is your only lifetime and it's passing you by. But I also do think that you need to prepare yourself mentally, emotionally, and financially (which it sounds like you are far along that path already) and I would also advise you identify more intentionally your potential landing spots. I don't think you should just go to any other city that's a little bigger. You really need to make sure you are jumping to a significantly better situation and that it really is likely to be a city you enjoy.

Good luck!!
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