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Old 04-20-2019, 06:59 AM
 
Location: San Francisco
317 posts, read 265,088 times
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What kind of a place is Guymon to stop for a night going west from Ozarks to Denver. I have read about it and it seems like the most un San Francisco Bay Area place in the nation (where I live) - plains, red meat, and not techies. Is it worth a stop as it looks as if it is midway en route.
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Old 04-20-2019, 09:33 AM
 
Location: Oklahoma
8,286 posts, read 6,893,594 times
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Yep, it's pretty much what I'd call "un San Franciso like" but it depends on what you call "stopping for a night". If "stopping for a night means" pull in, get a motel room, go to a local steakhouse or Mexican restaurant, sleep, get up, eat a good homecookin' meal at the local cafe...............and get on the road..........Yes. Steak, Mexican food and homecookin' are going to be really good there.

Anything beyond that. No.

There is an interesting little museum called "No Man's Land" museum that is about 10 miles SW at Panhandle State University that takes about an hour to look at that gives you insight into life on the high plains through the years. .

Other than that............

The sunsets (because the high plains are so flat) are similar to sunsets over the Pacific and you can see storms coming for an hour or so before they get there.

Guymon is typical of what we are seeing in the high plains. Old farming/feedlot town turning into a packing town. Guymon is now a majority minority community that used to be completely anglo. It is unique in that it has immigrants from all over the world. There are something like 30 different native languages spoken in the local school system. Mostly African and Central American.

There may be food places open by of these residents by now.

One interesting thing about Guymon is that in the 1930s the newspaper writer who first used the term "dust bowl" was in Guymon, OK when he used the term in an article. The article started with (Guymon, OK AP) and thus Oklahoma was saddled with the term "dust bowl" despite the fact that Oklahoma was one of only 5 or so states in the dust bowl and was the state contributing the least to the actual loss of top soil.

So in many ways Guymon would be an interesting cultural stop just to say you've been to a place like that.

When I was a kid and Guymon was an old feedlot/wheat/cattle town and the name "Ladd Hitch" meant area ranching power broker, I remember getting a giant stack of pancakes at the Ambassador Inn on Saturday morning out on the north end of town.

From what I understand, the Ambassador is still going along with the restaurant. I don't know how good it is anymore but it will always remain a fond memory for me.
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Old 04-23-2019, 10:09 PM
 
Location: OKIE-Ville
5,451 posts, read 7,972,603 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dmlandis View Post
What kind of a place is Guymon to stop for a night going west from Ozarks to Denver. I have read about it and it seems like the most un San Francisco Bay Area place in the nation (where I live) - plains, red meat, and not techies. Is it worth a stop as it looks as if it is midway en route.
Get ready to enjoy the feedlots as scenery.

You're in full-on plains out there in northwestern Oklahoma. A good chunk of Oklahoma resides in the lush and dense Crosstimbers...but not Guymon.

Interesting story for me and Guymon---it's the first place I had homemade biscuits with chocolate gravy. One time was enough.
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Old 04-24-2019, 02:10 PM
 
Location: OKLAHOMA
1,786 posts, read 3,732,214 times
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I'll be stopping there in a few days on our way to Colorado. We spend one night and leave in the morning. We live in Eastern Oklahoma so it is a long drive but I always enjoy seeing the panhandle. It is just so different than Eastern Oklahoma with the hills and greenery. Might take an extra day or say and drive a few hours up to Kenton Ok and hike the Black Mesa. Hiked it last year and it was neat. 9 miles is the hike but hot a hard hike except for the mile 3 - mile 4 marker.
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