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Old 05-15-2011, 11:31 AM
 
Location: Mountains of Oregon
16,418 posts, read 19,845,143 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mdvaden View Post
As one who works outdoors 50 weeks per year, that sounds somewhat like Portland up here, where the average July and August temps are like 82 degrees with virtually no rain for 8 weeks.

Medford has an average temperature of 81 in June, 91 in July, 91 in August and 83 in September.

With an average high of 70 to 72 in both May or June, I don't quite see wiggle room for 30+ weeks of cold weather.



"Sems to me Dec, Jan is usually the worst of our winter. Some days in Feb can be in the 70's".



The mountains are very nice down there. Although I don't like 6% downgrade, the drive through the mountains is very relaxing for me.

I'm so used to driving my truck in the mountains, i don't brake, just usually downshift.

Last edited by Hawk J; 05-15-2011 at 11:40 AM..
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Old 05-15-2011, 11:49 AM
 
6 posts, read 14,410 times
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Heck, I'm almost afraid to post my opinion here, vicious!

I've been researching for our move to Oregon this summer. I lived in CA most of my life with the exception of Missouri for the past 3 yrs. We have no intentions of moving back to CA, but have family there & want closer without being in their back yard.

I think that Central Point, or Ashland are where I'll concentrate my search, maybe Lebanon (hubby has friends there). I am also checking into Medford too, I've been there & at least know where to look. Been to Eastern Oregon & didn't like it too much. We'll be visiting there & check out our city or town of interest then make our decision. I have Middle Schoolers, so that is our main concern. We know our outdoor interests will be good no matter where we decide.
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Old 05-15-2011, 04:40 PM
 
Location: Pluto's Home Town
9,986 posts, read 12,693,704 times
Reputation: 5659
Mr. SmithW,

With all due respect, I don't see your point. Oregon as a state is very beautiful, and I would never go to post repeatedly in an inquiry about, say, LaGrande, and start talking about how southwest Oregon is so much better. Of course NW Oregon has beautiful places, and it is greener. But by that yardstick why not move to Puget Sound? Even greener and more beautiful. I agree the Columbia Gorge is beautiful, but have you checked out the N. Umpqua? Canoed the Klamath Marsh during the breeding bird season? Rafted the Rogue? If I want green, lush forests, I need only go north into the Umpqua Basin or west into the Smith River watershed to see mossy hemlock and cedar forests or redwood forests. I can go south into the Shasta Valley to get a slice of Montana. I can head to the Trinity Alps to get granite as white and naked as Yosemite, see crazy plant diversity on the serpentine soil patches of the Eddy Range, or the most diverse conifer forests in the WORLD in the Russian Wilderness. There is not single superior shade of beauty, or a single superior place to live.

We are fortunate to be having these debates, because the whole state is beautiful in a fascinating variety of ways. For instance, I am trying to get out to Lakeview area this summer, just to see that high desert and wetland country. I like that area precisely because it has a unique beauty that I can appreciate, but it is not overrun, except by pronghorn.
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Old 05-15-2011, 06:00 PM
 
Location: Oregon
1,458 posts, read 5,610,179 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mr.SmithW View Post
I don't care what any of you say, Northern Oregon has much more beautiful scenery than Southern Oregon, but to each their own!
I get around the entire state, so the north and south are both my own. Seems it may depend on where people go to explore and what they like, but I would find your point indefensible in a debate.

New world's tallest pine we found last January west of Grants Pass. Taller than any redwood in Muir Woods and a 6 foot diameter trunk. We found other pines and Douglas fir in the same area up to 8 and 9 feet diameter.



The southern Oregon coast looks just as nice as the north Oregon coast for the more part.



And although the mountains are different, the Siskiyous, for example, are just as interesting and scenic as northern peaks and ranges.

Whereas the north has the Columbia River Gorge, it does not include Crater Lake in southern Oregon.

So there is no practical way to say that one is more scenic than the other.
Attached Thumbnails
What areas around Medford are nice/affordable? What areas to avoid? Is White City trashy?-pine_600.jpg  
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Old 05-15-2011, 06:38 PM
 
Location: Pluto's Home Town
9,986 posts, read 12,693,704 times
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Thanks for the laugh Brenda...!!!

Well, I don't want to continue a NW vs. SW Oregon debate. I like both, and I like that they are different. But I must say that if the OP wanted to live in Medford and environs, N. California is very much our home range. The State of Jefferson!
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Old 05-15-2011, 06:41 PM
 
Location: Pluto's Home Town
9,986 posts, read 12,693,704 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mdvaden View Post
I get around the entire state, so the north and south are both my own. Seems it may depend on where people go to explore and what they like, but I would find your point indefensible in a debate.

New world's tallest pine we found last January west of Grants Pass. Taller than any redwood in Muir Woods and a 6 foot diameter trunk. We found other pines and Douglas fir in the same area up to 8 and 9 feet diameter.



The southern Oregon coast looks just as nice as the north Oregon coast for the more part.



And although the mountains are different, the Siskiyous, for example, are just as interesting and scenic as northern peaks and ranges.

Whereas the north has the Columbia River Gorge, it does not include Crater Lake in southern Oregon.

So there is no practical way to say that one is more scenic than the other.
Nice photos..!
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Old 05-15-2011, 07:44 PM
 
Location: Oregon
1,458 posts, read 5,610,179 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mr.SmithW View Post
... This was about Southern Oregon.. The Trinity Alps are in California..... In Medford you will have to drive at least 30 minutes before you are in any area with redeeming scenery. In Portland, you can drive 30 minutes east and already see Multnomah Falls.. I don't know about the rest of you, but some of us have too busy of schedules to do long 2 hour trips around the state to find amazing scenery. The drive to Crater Lake is no picnic either.
Was somebody talking about Trinity Alps?

Anyhow, from Medford, Crater Lake is not that far, and I find country scenery and forest most of the way to Crater Lake. Lots of good countryside that seems comparable driving past North Plains and the forest going toward Seaside and Cannon Beach.



Applegate Valley is pretty nice too for a back route to Grants Pass, and that drive starts about 15 minutes from the west edge of Medford.

Table Rocks are pretty slick looking too, both looking at them, and hiking up there. The view from the top is remarkable, especially during sunset.



I still drive Interstate 5 from Beaverton to the north CA redwoods about every 6 to 8 weeks. And every time I drive though the mountains between like Roseburg, Wolf Creek and Grants Pass, it comes to mind that the range is unlike most northern routes between Interstate 5 and the coast.

Also, we want to keep in mind that Multnomah Falls is not the norm for scenery in the Portland area like Clackamas, Hillsboro, Laurel, Newberg, Etc..

So the long story short, is that residents of the Medford, Central Point, Ashland or Grants Pass towns have an abundance of scenery to enjoy right next door. Its about as good a place as any to reside.

Last edited by mdvaden; 05-15-2011 at 08:06 PM..
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Old 05-15-2011, 08:01 PM
 
Location: The beautiful Rogue Valley, Oregon
7,785 posts, read 17,065,002 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mdvaden View Post
And every time I drive though the mountains between like Roseburg, Wolf Creek and Grants Pass, it comes to mind that the range is unlike most northern routes between Interstate 5 and the coast.
The Cascades and the Coast Range are mostly basaltic andesite and basalt with layers of ash and debris mixed in. The Siskiyous are a metamorphic terrain of schist and gneiss (types of metamorphosed granite, basically) which give you very different geomorphic patterns - very different look and feel.
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Old 05-15-2011, 08:44 PM
 
Location: Oregon
129 posts, read 540,771 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mdvaden View Post
Was somebody talking about Trinity Alps?


Also, we want to keep in mind that Multnomah Falls is not the norm for scenery in the Portland area like Clackamas, Hillsboro, Laurel, Newberg, Etc..
Actually, you are wrong.. Yeah, sure if you drive west of Forest Park (another amazing piece of scenery right in the city!), and enter Hillsboro and Beaverton, the area is flat, swampy, farmland and suburban sprawl. However, if you drive east of Troutdale, the entire route from Troutdale to THe Dalles is filled with waterfalls, amazing rock formations, the Columbia River. Basically, every few moments is a breathtaking moment. All this is just 30 minutes from the city and goes on and on for hours. The Columbia Gorge has more waterfalls concentrated within a 60 mi radius than almost any place on Earth. So, yes Multnomah Falls is typical scenery. There are so many waterfalls people don't even know about that are not even on the roadside. A short hike through Oneonta Gorge takes you to the amazing Triple Falls. Good luck, finding a tripe waterfall in Southern Oregon. The hike through Eagle Creek wilderness area leads you to many amazing waterfalls. Southern Oregon has very few waterfalls. Good luck seeing a 600 ft waterfall , 30 min from Medford.

Also, I find the lush green farmland outside of Beaverton and Hillsboro to be reminiscent of the French countryside. The mossy green oak trees surrounding the farms makes for quite a picturesque display. It is very rustic and beautiful with colorful farms. I find the farmland around Southern Oregon to look more rugged and not so well kept. Heres another thing, people talk about these very green mossy spots in SOuthern Oregon. What they are not telling you is that most of them are located by streams or rivers. In Northern Oregon, you will find green and mossy forests far from water areas. However, in Southern Oregon, if you are located farther from water structures, the area becomes more desert-like.

BTW.. I consider Umpqua to be more Northern Oregonish.. At least with respect to its scenery.


P.S. Crater Lake is just a tourist trap now.. You snap your photo and leave, but it's not even like you can camp there a night and experience the place. I don't even think you can hike around Crater Lake. At least I don't have to pay to hike to the top of Multnomah Falls.

Here's another amazing experience.. Larch Mountain.. You can drive to the top and from the viewpoint see Mt. Rainier, Mt. Hood, Mt. St. Helens, Mt. Adams, Mt. Jefferson, Three Sisters all together. Can you see all these amazing mountain peaks anywhere in Southern Oregon?

AH, one of so very many in the Columbia Gorge:

Last edited by Mr.SmithW; 05-15-2011 at 08:54 PM..
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Old 05-15-2011, 09:27 PM
 
22,571 posts, read 30,546,141 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mr.SmithW View Post


As far as flowers, my parents always told me on their trips to Portland how amazing it was to see Rhododendrons growing everywhere. HOw heartbreaking would it be to be in a place with no Rhododendrons..



.
Rhododendron occidentale is native to Southern Oregon and many people find it preferable to the show garden varieties found in Portland landscaped yards.

Anyway, the whole state is beautiful; no need to put down other people's personal preferences simply because you don't share them.

Great photos, mdvaden; thanks.
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