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Old 02-09-2012, 03:22 PM
 
11 posts, read 15,708 times
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I am farmer from the deserts of central AZ. The crime, pollution, border problems, politics, urban sprawl, the horrendous heat and just the fast paced life in general have got me looking elsewhere.

I had a couple of people mention that I should look at eastern/central OR. While I can take cold weather I am not too crazy about prolonged bitter cold. I love just about anything to do with the outdoors, hunting, fishing camping, some photography, and just taking in creation.

I have seen on some maps there is a large farming community on the OR/ID border in the Ontario area. Is anyone familiar with this area? Lifestyles, religious orientations, politics, weather, outdoor activities, agricultural opportunities? I have a couple of weeks free in late May or early June to look and was wondering what the area was like. Any other suggestions as to where to consider?

I have heard so much about OR that regardless I think I want to see it. I have heard it is one of the most beautiful states in the nation.
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Old 02-09-2012, 04:35 PM
 
Location: Baker City, Oregon
4,469 posts, read 6,753,038 times
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You might want to look at this map. It's for kids so even I can understand it : http://aitc.oregonstate.edu/resource... (broken link)

As you can see, most of Eastern and Central Oregon is cattle country.

Onions and garlic are grown around Ontario. At harvest time there is the mild smell of onions in the air and instead of tumbleweed, you might see onion skins blowing down the road.

The green area on the map is largely cattle ranching with a lot of hay being grown. This area is more mountainous and picturesque than the Ontario area.

The yellow area is famous for wheat. Much of it is exported to Asian countries – it is a major Oregon export item. It is flat relative to the green area.

The orange area is agriculturally similar to the green area.

Malheur and Harney counties south of Ontario are very sparsely populated, even by Eastern Oregon standards.

Click on City-Data.com in the upper left corner of this page. In the page that pops up you can type in a city name and find information about it. For instance:

//www.city-data.com/city/Ontario-Oregon.html

//www.city-data.com/city/John-Day-Oregon.html

//www.city-data.com/city/Baker-City-Oregon.html

//www.city-data.com/city/Pendleton-Oregon.html

Here are some pictures of Oregon. About half are of Central and Eastern Oregon: Oregon Icons Photo Images of Oregon

The sort of outdoor activities you are interested in are abundant. One example of many: Wallowa-Whitman National Forest - Recreation
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Old 02-09-2012, 09:57 PM
 
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Thanks so much for the info and links. It gives me a good starting point to plan a trip through some of those areas. It's much appreciated!
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Old 02-09-2012, 10:20 PM
 
Location: Portland, Oregon
10,855 posts, read 18,671,366 times
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Religion

The religious orientation of most of Oregon is Blue Domer. Basically they worship God's creation under the blue dome s/he created at every opportunity. Attendance on Saturday (for Sabbath observers) and Sunday is significant.

Houses of worship of all faiths can be found in larger communities. Most Christians are Protestant (in that I include Mormons), next Roman Catholic with a sprinklings of strong Russian and Greek Catholic churches. In rural Willamette Valley there are a number of Mennonites who have the reputation of being very good farmers.

Residents are live and let live on matters of faith. People who protholize or inquire if a stranger is 'born again' are treated courteously but are avoided socially.

Last edited by Nell Plotts; 02-09-2012 at 11:04 PM..
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Old 02-16-2012, 01:57 PM
 
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All these are great recommendations. I would also look into the Treasure Valley of Idaho, and the fertile farming grounds in the Palouse and around Walla Walla, Washington.

Oregon has good farming, but if you want slightly more mild winters, look into eastern Washington and parts of Idaho.
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Old 02-18-2012, 07:37 PM
 
758 posts, read 2,219,641 times
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What makes you think rural Oregon is any different? Rural areas tend to be poor, undereducated, and drug-infested, no matter where they are. Sorry, but it's the truth.
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Old 02-19-2012, 11:19 AM
 
Location: Portland, Oregon
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I don't agree at all. NW farmers are often college graduates, have access to research conducted at our agricultural colleges, and in my experience smart. I do agree that may poor live in rural areas because the cost of housing is low and drug manufacturing takes place in isolated buildings.

The dumbest thing I heard of on the part of farmers were those in Idaho who objected when their Governor made concessions to Micron to enable them to expand without leaving. The Governor told them that unless they built a more diverse economy their children would be forced to leave to find employment. They reluctantly relented.
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Old 02-21-2012, 10:32 AM
 
Location: Rockaway Beach, Oregon
381 posts, read 943,019 times
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I tend to disagree as well. Rural areas in Oregon have about the same proportions of ignorance, crime, and poverty as downtown PDX does.

The only real difference is that in rural areas, it gets a bit more personal and up-close due to the smaller population... you simply can't ignore it as easily when it's a relative or someone you actually know and have met. In the city, most of the criminal, poor, and ignorant are just faceless bodies in an amorphous mass of humanity - you don't know them, they don't know you, and they pass out of your lives as easily as they passed into it.

One other thing is, in the city, there are agencies and people specifically trained or employed to 'deal with it'. Out in rural areas, it is more likely that you will have to confront it yourself.
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Old 02-22-2012, 02:39 PM
 
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I've lived in rural areas most of my life and have no desire to live anywhere else. My experiences with the people where I grew up in the country have been positive. When things went bad here was during the real estate boom and city dwellers flocked to the farming areas. We used to leave the keys in the truck and doors unlocked at night. Can't do that anymore. These people are a completely different class of people. A different set of values and morals. If they are the sophisticated, educated, enlightened bunch I'll just stay in the dark about the better things in life.

Thanks again for the advice. I appreciate it.
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Old 02-24-2012, 08:50 PM
 
Location: Portlandish, OR
955 posts, read 1,704,245 times
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tnaz can i ask where you currently live in az?
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