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Old 02-06-2015, 11:19 AM
 
477 posts, read 508,940 times
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Likely I will be moving to OR this year. Recently I've looked at Toledo - yes I know there is a paper mill there. The places I have looked at are 2 miles or more north of the mill. But I have OTHER issues that I consider more important at the moment.

In looking at the weather patterns for the area, it would appear that it rarely gets up to 70 even in the middle of summer. Average high temp for July is reportedly 64F to 67F.

And it gets 2x the US average rainfall, about 67" per year - but virtually no snow.

Average lows are reportedly 38ish.

So, great there on the downside, but ... seems pretty chilly even during the "warm" season.

I'm wondering how the combination of double the rain and cool summer temps affects your ability to garden. Seems like fungus and mold might be problems in cool wet temps, and I wonder if plants that like it hot, or at least warm, such as tomatoes, peppers, and eggplant will struggle.

Not to mention fruit trees.

I like the fact that it never gets super cold - but I'm not sure a place that also never really gets warm is really my cup of tea.

What's the skinny on weather in Toledo?
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Old 02-06-2015, 12:08 PM
 
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The Coast Range is very wet and Toledo is right at the base of that. The coast in Oregon is not a hot, sunbathing kind of coast and Toledo is close to that. It's the best of both worlds.

In much of Oregon west of the Cascades, you have to pick your tomatoes and other vegetables carefully to make sure you'll get some that will ripen in the shorter growing season. Pick ones hybridized by OSU or Russian varieties. Or, you can make a greenhouse and have a longer season.
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Old 02-06-2015, 01:21 PM
 
Location: North Idaho
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It's better than the coast because you are back away from the salt spray. Freezing is rare.

You should be able to grow darn near any veggie there. For the heat lovers like tomatoes, you'll want to put in a green house or some high tunnels.

Apples, prunes, and pears do well. Filberts grow wild along the sides of the roads. Peaches and nectarines do best with some shelter from the rain and plan on copper spray every winter.

Desert King figs will grow and fruit in Portland, so you should be able to grow them in Toledo. They are supposed to grow directly on the coast, too. Ask me in a couple of years how my figs are doing 1/2 mile from the beach.

You could grow ultra-hardy pecans. I have those growing in Bend, so Toledo would be a snap.

You'll do well with asparagus and rhubarb and strawberries. Any of the brambles will grow and try to take over.

The issue is going to be that Toledo is hilly, so you might have to have terraced gardens.
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Old 02-06-2015, 02:10 PM
 
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It definitely exceeds 70, 80, and even 90 on a regular basis in the summer. Inland areas from the coast warm up a lot more than the coast itself. If Newport is at 70, it'll probably be 10-15 degrees hotter a few miles inland. During the occasional heatwave it'll even exceed 100, though that's not particularly common.

I think the real heat-sink in that area is the plain where Siletz is located. It gets some humidity from the river as well, and its valley captures the warm air that builds up when the sun is out. I know there were anecdotal reports of Siletz hitting 115 degrees one day during an early 90's heatwave (perhaps 1993 or 1994), but I don't think they had an official weather recording station in the town back then.
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Old 02-06-2015, 02:19 PM
 
Location: The beautiful Rogue Valley, Oregon
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Be careful looking up weather records for smaller towns in Oregon (or anywhere, really). Usually the weather shown is actually the closest airport with weather-reporting capabilities. For Toledo, that would be Newport, right on the coast. You need to be able to see where the source for the listed weather is.
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Old 02-06-2015, 02:43 PM
 
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Thanks. And on going back and looking at the weather data - it was on a site with which I am not familiar, I guess Toledo is so small it doesn't show up on most of the more prominent weather sites - it turns out that the data I was looking at was for average temperatures - eg they are averaging the temp over the entire day.

As opposed to the average max high temp over the course of the month.

So - it does routinely get above 70F in the summer there, and occasionally even into the 80s. That makes it sound considerably less chilly.
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Old 02-06-2015, 02:48 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by oregonwoodsmoke View Post
The issue is going to be that Toledo is hilly, so you might have to have terraced gardens.
Yeah, I have been careful to make sure there is enough flattish space for a garden. I'm no spring chicken, so I won't be putting in a giant garden anyway.

I am a little disappointed that Toledo apparently caps backyard chickens at 4 - instead of 6. That kind of makes it hard to have some for laying and some for lunch, LOL!
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Old 02-06-2015, 02:49 PM
 
477 posts, read 508,940 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by PNW-type-gal View Post
Be careful looking up weather records for smaller towns in Oregon (or anywhere, really). Usually the weather shown is actually the closest airport with weather-reporting capabilities. For Toledo, that would be Newport, right on the coast. You need to be able to see where the source for the listed weather is.
Wait - there's an airport in Newport? Is that a real airport, or a little private commuter airport?
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Old 02-06-2015, 03:18 PM
 
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Quote:
I am a little disappointed that Toledo apparently caps backyard chickens at 4
That's presumably within city limits. But like a lot of small towns, there are plenty of homes and yards on land administered by the county, which would have looser regulations. You'll see quite a few properties with horses, goats, cows, sheep, alpacas, geese, etc. in the area, close to town, but outside of city limits themselves.

Quote:
Wait - there's an airport in Newport?
Yes, airport code ONP. It has had scheduled commercial service to Portland in the past, but now it is general aviation/cargo.
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Old 02-06-2015, 03:31 PM
 
477 posts, read 508,940 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tablemtn View Post
That's presumably within city limits. But like a lot of small towns, there are plenty of homes and yards on land administered by the county, which would have looser regulations. You'll see quite a few properties with horses, goats, cows, sheep, alpacas, geese, etc. in the area, close to town, but outside of city limits themselves.
How likely would it be for such a property to have city (or county) water and sewer?

I am too old and decrepit (and poor) to be messing about with septic and wells. If the well went bad I couldn't afford to have a new one dug, or, more likely, to have to do without because of groundwater contamination.
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