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Old 11-28-2016, 05:25 PM
 
Location: Riverside, IA
51 posts, read 48,762 times
Reputation: 44

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Quote:
Originally Posted by PNW-type-gal View Post
Gathering Glass in Ashland. Not sure what size kiln you are looking for. Portland has some large glass studios.
PNW, yes Gathering Glass is the one I was thinking of, I do plan on visiting them when I come down in March/April. It's hard to learn this art without having access to a studio with the right equipment, furnaces etc. That and then finding a place that is willing to take apprentices or who at least are willing to teach the fundamental, for a fee usually, aren't all that common. Where I'm at currently in the midwest they are scarce as hen's teeth, lol.
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Old 11-28-2016, 07:18 PM
 
Location: Salem, OR
15,490 posts, read 40,186,319 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Russspeak View Post
PNW, yes Gathering Glass is the one I was thinking of, I do plan on visiting them when I come down in March/April. It's hard to learn this art without having access to a studio with the right equipment, furnaces etc. That and then finding a place that is willing to take apprentices or who at least are willing to teach the fundamental, for a fee usually, aren't all that common. Where I'm at currently in the midwest they are scarce as hen's teeth, lol.
I'd also check with the Glass Forge in Grants Pass. It would be a little bit of a drive from Ashland and Medford, but they have great blown glass there. I know they do classes.
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Old 11-28-2016, 08:26 PM
 
Location: Riverside, IA
51 posts, read 48,762 times
Reputation: 44
Quote:
Originally Posted by Silverfall View Post
I'd also check with the Glass Forge in Grants Pass. It would be a little bit of a drive from Ashland and Medford, but they have great blown glass there. I know they do classes.
Oh great, that's not too far out of the area I'm interested in, I'll have to add that to my list, thank you Silverfall ;?)

On a side note, anyone live in or familiar with Cave Junction and the surrounding area? Seems like a pretty small town, but being a tourist attraction I wonder if that affects the property values or not? Since it's closer to the coast, I suppose it gets more precipitation, but is it warmer due to the ocean affect or is the elevation high enough to negate that? It's pretty much at the edge of how far I'd want to be from the "metropolitan" area of Medford/Ashland but I may have to make trade-offs to find what I'm looking for at the right price.
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Old 11-29-2016, 01:21 AM
 
Location: Oregon Coast
15,189 posts, read 8,778,429 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Russspeak View Post
Oh great, that's not too far out of the area I'm interested in, I'll have to add that to my list, thank you Silverfall ;?)

On a side note, anyone live in or familiar with Cave Junction and the surrounding area? Seems like a pretty small town, but being a tourist attraction I wonder if that affects the property values or not? Since it's closer to the coast, I suppose it gets more precipitation, but is it warmer due to the ocean affect or is the elevation high enough to negate that? It's pretty much at the edge of how far I'd want to be from the "metropolitan" area of Medford/Ashland but I may have to make trade-offs to find what I'm looking for at the right price.
First, the coast is not warmer than the inland areas. It's more moderate than the inland areas. The coast doesn't have the hot and cold extremes, that the inland areas have. Coastal weather is pretty much the same year round. Winter, summer, day, night, the temperature doesn't vary much. It's always slightly cool year round, with the rare exception.

Second, Cave Junction is closer to Grants Pass then it is to the coast. The weather is about the same as Grants Pass. Hot summers, relatively cold winters. Cave Junction was actually one of the first areas that popped into my mind when I first read your post. I don't know if you can find exactly what you are looking for, but I think your best bet might be any of the towns in the Cave Junction Illinois Valley area. One great thing about Cave Junction is that it gives you easy access to both Grant's Pass, as well as to Crescent City.

If I were you I would give more consideration to the climate though. The climate of Oregon can vary quite a bit from one place to another. I would hate to see you build your house, and then think, damn, I could have build on the other side of the mountains, and the weather would have been so much better.
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Old 11-29-2016, 01:43 AM
 
Location: Portland
1,620 posts, read 2,284,328 times
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FYI: Many people in Oregon have no problem driving four hours for an activity and then drive right back home, even in winter.
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Old 11-29-2016, 08:34 AM
 
Location: Riverside, IA
51 posts, read 48,762 times
Reputation: 44
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cloudy Dayz View Post
First, the coast is not warmer than the inland areas. It's more moderate than the inland areas. The coast doesn't have the hot and cold extremes, that the inland areas have. Coastal weather is pretty much the same year round. Winter, summer, day, night, the temperature doesn't vary much. It's always slightly cool year round, with the rare exception.

Second, Cave Junction is closer to Grants Pass then it is to the coast. The weather is about the same as Grants Pass. Hot summers, relatively cold winters. Cave Junction was actually one of the first areas that popped into my mind when I first read your post. I don't know if you can find exactly what you are looking for, but I think your best bet might be any of the towns in the Cave Junction Illinois Valley area. One great thing about Cave Junction is that it gives you easy access to both Grant's Pass, as well as to Crescent City.

If I were you I would give more consideration to the climate though. The climate of Oregon can vary quite a bit from one place to another. I would hate to see you build your house, and then think, damn, I could have build on the other side of the mountains, and the weather would have been so much better.
Thanks Cloudy, good to know that. Actually when I first started searching for property, Cave Junction had more lots available in the price range I was looking for, so yes it is on my list. Plus I want to check out the caves too - do you know if this is a big tourist attraction? As for climate, again one of the reasons I chose this area is the lack of extremes. I've lived in both hot and cold (Las Vegas to Alaska), dry and humid, and I've come to the conclusion that I don't like extremes, lol.

When I retire I don't want to have to shovel snow all winter, and I don't want to be forced to stay inside with the AC on because its too hot and humid. Now mind you I can take a little of both, but not for months at a time, and the only time I really enjoy hot weather is if there's a beach, lake or river I can jump into, and cold if I can go skiing, sleding or sleigh riding, lol.

And while I prefer a drier climate, the way things are going in much of the country with climate change threatening more extremes, I've decided I want to live somewhere where water is not a concern. I can live with too much rain, but not without it. The terrible drought in Cali is something I think we're likely to see more of in the coming decades.
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Old 11-29-2016, 08:38 AM
 
Location: Riverside, IA
51 posts, read 48,762 times
Reputation: 44
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sherwoody View Post
FYI: Many people in Oregon have no problem driving four hours for an activity and then drive right back home, even in winter.
Yeah, I'm not against it, but I'm not fond of having to drive an hour to get to and from places I'll need to go to buy building supplies and other stuff that might not be available in smaller towns (plus the price is always higher at the smaller stores, unfortunately). Although if I win the lottery or my riskier stock picks go through the roof (hey there's a chance, lol), then I wo't have to worry bout that
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Old 11-29-2016, 04:37 PM
 
Location: Oregon Coast
15,189 posts, read 8,778,429 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Russspeak View Post
Thanks Cloudy, good to know that. Actually when I first started searching for property, Cave Junction had more lots available in the price range I was looking for, so yes it is on my list. Plus I want to check out the caves too - do you know if this is a big tourist attraction? As for climate, again one of the reasons I chose this area is the lack of extremes. I've lived in both hot and cold (Las Vegas to Alaska), dry and humid, and I've come to the conclusion that I don't like extremes, lol.

When I retire I don't want to have to shovel snow all winter, and I don't want to be forced to stay inside with the AC on because its too hot and humid. Now mind you I can take a little of both, but not for months at a time, and the only time I really enjoy hot weather is if there's a beach, lake or river I can jump into, and cold if I can go skiing, sleding or sleigh riding, lol.

And while I prefer a drier climate, the way things are going in much of the country with climate change threatening more extremes, I've decided I want to live somewhere where water is not a concern. I can live with too much rain, but not without it. The terrible drought in Cali is something I think we're likely to see more of in the coming decades.
The only time you are going to get dry weather in Oregon is for a couple of months in the summer. The rest of the year is not going to be dry.

For me the problem with the inland areas of Oregon, is the extreme temperatures. Inland temperatures vary from 20° or lower in the winter to about 110° high in the summer. Coastal temperatures generally stay between 32° and 80° year round. Which is in my comfort zone. I don't want to have to deal with freezing temperatures in the winter or triple digits in the summer. So for me the coast is the place to live, and I visit the rest of Oregon when the weather is good.
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Old 11-29-2016, 04:48 PM
 
Location: The beautiful Rogue Valley, Oregon
7,785 posts, read 18,733,030 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Cloudy Dayz View Post
The only time you are going to get dry weather in Oregon is for a couple of months in the summer. The rest of the year is not going to be dry.

For me the problem with the inland areas of Oregon, is the extreme temperatures. Inland temperatures vary from 20° or lower in the winter to about 110° high in the summer. Coastal temperatures generally stay between 32° and 80° year round. Which is in my comfort zone. I don't want to have to deal with freezing temperatures in the winter or triple digits in the summer. So for me the coast is the place to live, and I visit the rest of Oregon when the weather is good.
And I'd rather put up with a couple weeks of very high temps in the summer for much more sun, drier weather and much less rain and wind. I can visit the coast if I want cold, damp and windy.

The average summer high on the coast doesn't get out of the 60s. (Brookings can occasionally get warmer in the summer). Brookings also has the least rain, but it still get in excess of 70" a year.
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Old 11-29-2016, 05:50 PM
 
Location: Myrtle Creek, Oregon
15,293 posts, read 17,565,356 times
Reputation: 25225
Quote:
Originally Posted by PNW-type-gal View Post
Certainly there are a lot of "alternate construction" houses down this way, and they are not incompatible with modern code, but you will need to meet building codes. The only rammed earth block houses I have seen have been in the high desert on the other side of the Cascades and in the desert Southwest, not sure why.

Land is expensive in Southern Oregon, particularly as you get near a city - I'd think your requirements would run between $250,000 and $800,000, just for raw land.

It's always a good idea to find a property with a current perc test - not just a perc test, but a current perc test - so you know that you'll be able to put in a septic system. The DEQ, which handles water and septic permits, is pretty strict.
The problem with dirt houses is that it is hugely expensive to build them to meet seismic standards. Essentially you have to build a steel structure to hold up the dirt, then build a dirt house around it. Just attaching the dirt to the steel costs a wad.
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