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Old 09-03-2020, 01:22 AM
 
645 posts, read 515,946 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mlulu23 View Post
Virtual rep. I would be on the coast too in a heartbeat if it weren't for the distinct possibility of a nasty mega disaster. This makes me sad as the oceanic climate suits me to a T. As it is, I'm in eastern Oregon, and I'm not happy with the climate here.

The earth acts like a big machine with some things coming as a surprise while other things are more predictable. But we can learn from other's nightmares. There was an interesting article a while back concerning Japan. They were in the hills near the ocean there looking at some old homes. There were some ancient stone markers with the warning "Do not build below this marker", as that is where the waves stopped. Way back when, the town below had been wiped out from a tsunami, and the old ones were trying to warn future generations to save them from sorrow. We have no such markers here. Here I found the article for you.

https://www.nytimes.com/2011/04/21/w...ones.html?_r=0
They have pretty good tsunami impact maps for the coast, it wouldn't be too hard to find a place that wouldn't be destroyed by a tsunami. You'd still be hit by a large earthquake though, and the infrastructure damage would mean you'd want some survival stuff.
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Old 09-04-2020, 04:16 PM
 
Location: East central Florida coast
147 posts, read 248,736 times
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mlulu, I agree about the fit of the climate of the OR coast. I would love to live in Newport as well...and yes, this was after visiting a friend (who no longer lives there) for a month during the rainy winter season. I love the rain and cool weather too and can relate. As I approach retirement, I still dream of living there, perhaps outside the tsunami zone. My fear is that a 9.0 earthquake would likely collapse most structures and cause many deaths (like simply states above), regardless if there is a tsunami or not. That same friend moved outside of Olympia, WA and loves it there. Still an earthquake risk, but has a similar climate (albeit much less rain than in Newport). Hmmmm, still weighing risk versus reward...


I have to say that I was impressed with the people of Newport... such a friendly close knit group of people (IMHO)...I enjoyed the sense of community...not sure if that has changed or not.
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Old 09-04-2020, 04:38 PM
 
Location: Around and about
3,027 posts, read 1,323,289 times
Reputation: 5212
Quote:
Originally Posted by carrob View Post
mlulu, I agree about the fit of the climate of the OR coast. I would love to live in Newport as well...and yes, this was after visiting a friend (who no longer lives there) for a month during the rainy winter season. I love the rain and cool weather too and can relate. As I approach retirement, I still dream of living there, perhaps outside the tsunami zone. My fear is that a 9.0 earthquake would likely collapse most structures and cause many deaths (like simply states above), regardless if there is a tsunami or not. That same friend moved outside of Olympia, WA and loves it there. Still an earthquake risk, but has a similar climate (albeit much less rain than in Newport). Hmmmm, still weighing risk versus reward...


I have to say that I was impressed with the people of Newport... such a friendly close knit group of people (IMHO)...I enjoyed the sense of community...not sure if that has changed or not.
I hope we can both find the climate that pleases us. The hot, and dry summers of eastern Oregon don't do it for me, sadly. But for some it's ideal. Out of the 3 summers I've been here two have been pretty smokey from the fires, especially 2018. The hottest it got that year was 108, ugh. I enjoy the rain too, it cleans the air, makes things green, and is refreshing. And you can still go out in it, and frog around unless it's too heavy.
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Old 09-06-2020, 04:48 PM
 
Location: Myrtle Creek, Oregon
15,297 posts, read 14,639,617 times
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The southern end of the Cascadia Fault quakes about twice as often as the north end. All the popular projections are for a "full rip" quake, which only happens every 800 years or so. The southern part quakes every 270 years or so, and that is the part that is overdue, though it's only been 320 years.

In any case, if you live on a bluff or hill, a tsunami is not that big a deal. The Oregon Coast is rocky and steep. The quake would be of more concern. Be sure the house is well anchored on the hillside and not in a slide zone.
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Old 09-12-2020, 01:10 AM
 
Location: Around and about
3,027 posts, read 1,323,289 times
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Surviving a Tsunami‚ÄĒLessons from Chile, Hawaii, and Japan

https://pubs.usgs.gov/circ/c1187/
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Old 09-14-2020, 06:32 PM
 
22,406 posts, read 29,726,264 times
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https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kSNN...BTYBXM4AHze1yM
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Old 09-14-2020, 06:45 PM
 
Location: Around and about
3,027 posts, read 1,323,289 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Metlakatla View Post
Thanks for this link to add to my collection. The following gives more info on these slow quakes. About halfway down the article is a link to 4 yrs worth of slow quakes which show them traveling down the left coast. Pretty interesting. They go down into Oregon too.

https://blogs.scientificamerican.com...bduction-zone/
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Old 09-18-2020, 03:38 PM
 
6,061 posts, read 13,774,705 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Metlakatla View Post
^Right; we're not all in the tsumani zone over here. Nonetheless, a big quake would make life pretty unpleasant for those of us who didn't get washed away by a tidal wave for months or maybe even years. I'll probably be moving back to Baker City after the plague settles down some.

This is our concern as well. We can live anywhere now and have often contemplated buying on the coast outside of a tsunami zone. However, even if our home isn't washed away, how long will we have to wait for services - or a helicopter to get us out if roads are gone? There aren't very many roads in Oregon. Sometimes there's literally only one road in and out. There's also the issue of refueling if we can even get out. Where does Oregon's gas for vehicles come from? Uh-huh. Even though we have become borderline "preppers" in recent years (and even more so due to recent events) and we feel fairly prepared to deal with no power, no water source, no access to grocery stores, etc. for a few months on our own without assistance, we still don't want to put ourselves in a situation where we might be stuck and out of luck for that long if we can help it. That's what's kept us in the valley so far and looking other directions besides west when we do get the bug to relocate elsewhere.
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Old 09-19-2020, 12:12 PM
 
Location: Portland, Oregon
10,645 posts, read 17,999,571 times
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I have two lectures by geologists discussing the Cascadia Fault on YouTube. If a Mod would agree to make the links "sticky" I would post them.
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Old 09-19-2020, 10:38 PM
 
Location: Oregon Coast
9,096 posts, read 3,799,493 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Nell Plotts View Post
I have two lectures by geologists discussing the Cascadia Fault on YouTube. If a Mod would agree to make the links "sticky" I would post them.
Oh yeah, just what we need. A sticky to remind everybody that we are all going to die in a mega-tsunami.
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