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Old 11-27-2019, 08:22 PM
 
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No, I don't think that's it.
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Old 11-27-2019, 08:29 PM
 
Location: Myrtle Creek, Oregon
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sam812 View Post
I am just guessing that Oregon is like Colorado and the other legal recreational states.There is enough black market weed to sink a battle ship sold almost daily. This is because they are supplying the surrounding states that do not have legal weed. They use BM weed because you can only buy small amounts legally. I live in a state that it is still illegal and EVERYONE I know that smokes weed is smoking weed from Colorado because it is the closest.
The only surrounding state that doesn't have legal weed is Idaho. Washington, California and Nevada are wide open.

I suspect some of the smuggled weed is making its way into the legal channels via forged paperwork. The only thing not legal about it is taking it across state lines.

If the feds ever delist pot, Oregon will have a major export crop. Take a look at what Canadians go through to grow decent weed in the far north. You can grow as good or better in your back yard in Oregon.


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IBW34r4JbWA
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Old 11-27-2019, 09:09 PM
 
1,226 posts, read 502,597 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Larry Caldwell View Post
The only surrounding state that doesn't have legal weed is Idaho. Washington, California and Nevada are wide open.

I suspect some of the smuggled weed is making its way into the legal channels via forged paperwork. The only thing not legal about it is taking it across state lines.

If the feds ever delist pot, Oregon will have a major export crop. Take a look at what Canadians go through to grow decent weed in the far north. You can grow as good or better in your back yard in Oregon.


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IBW34r4JbWA
It doesn't have to be states right beside it. When you can easily buy weed for $50 a ounce in Oregon and easily sell it for $400 a ounce in states it is still illegal.

The legal channels are so flooded now there can't be much black market weed making it into the system.

The only reason Oregon outdoor weed is even remotely as good as the indoor weed is because they are growing it commercially and quantity is more important than super high end quality. It is like buying cabinets at Home Depot or having a true craftsman build them for you.

Because of the location I live this is all stuff I learned from PBS after school specials.
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Old 12-02-2019, 10:21 AM
 
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How Legal Marijuana Is Helping the Black Market

Quote:
With Oregon growers producing three times more marijuana than consumers inside the state can handle, neighboring Idaho has reported a 665 percent increase in the amount of illicit marijuana officers have seized. In 2016, the year before Oregon’s adult use laws took effect, troopers confiscated 508 pounds of marijuana. Oregon’s new recreational market went into full effect on January 1, 2017, and the number of licensed dispensaries jumped from 99 to 260. That same year, the amount of cannabis confiscated by Idaho state troopers skyrocketed to 1,376 pounds and kept climbing. Last year, seizures totaled nearly a ton.

Law enforcement officers in Oregon, though, are under no illusion that their state’s growers are not feeding that supply.

“If anything, it’s gotten worse" since legalization, Oregon State Police Sgt. Brandon Boice says. “There’s still high demand for Southern Oregon marijuana throughout the country, that has not changed.”

When Oregon legalized marijuana in 2014, the state tried very hard to stifle its black market by ensuring the path into the legal market was as easy as possible. It did not limit licenses and it simplified regulations, creating a program with one of the lowest barriers to entry in the United States.

It worked.

Now, Oregon is an easy place to find high-quality, cheap, legal marijuana. There are more than 650 licensed marijuana dispensaries in the state, or three times the number of McDonald's restaurants (205). If you’re an Oregonian living in a town or county with legal pot and you want to buy marijuana, there is no reason to shop illegally.
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Old 12-02-2019, 11:07 AM
 
Location: Myrtle Creek, Oregon
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I'm sure it will continue to be a problem until the nation gets off its puritan high horse and adopts reasonable drug laws. Did you know that accidental overdose deaths are all from illegal drugs? If people can go to a pharmacy, they know what they are getting. If they buy on the street, they have no idea what else is in the package.

It reminds me of the Nixon administration when they decided to spray paraquat on Mexican pot fields. The farmers harvested before the plants could wilt, packaged it fresh spray and all, and sold it into the US market.

I also don't understand why the article focused on Oregon grows. Northern California has the same climate, and has always grown way more weed than Oregon. Twenty years ago I tried to hire a carpenter foreman who had moved to Northern California. He laughed at me, and said he was growing pot, which paid better than working his ass off on construction projects.

Oregon is also not as wide open as the article indicates. All pot growers have to use CTS (the Cannabis Tracking System) which has pretty strict rules for site access and inventory. The OLCC doesn't have monitoring up to speed yet, but CTS design looks pretty good. When they get the necessary employees hired and trained, the system should work pretty well.
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Old 12-02-2019, 11:23 AM
 
Location: The beautiful Rogue Valley, Oregon
7,785 posts, read 17,169,237 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Larry Caldwell View Post
Oregon is also not as wide open as the article indicates. All pot growers have to use CTS (the Cannabis Tracking System) which has pretty strict rules for site access and inventory. The OLCC doesn't have monitoring up to speed yet, but CTS design looks pretty good. When they get the necessary employees hired and trained, the system should work pretty well.
Last year sometime the local paper had a feature about the problems with enforcing legit vs non-legit sites, as OLCC didn't have a database of legal grow locations (or at least didn't have one they would share with law enforcement). SO a sheriff could be driving down a road and see a grow and have no way of knowing it was legal. I THINK that has been fixed since.

I also suspect that this year's bust hemp market plus tightened rules might shake out some of the get-rich-quick money. Although the way market works in our winner-take-all quasi-capitalist market is that the smaller growers will go down and the large, well-funded, backed by big investment groups will be the winners, just like every other industry.

Just like the beer market, where virtually all the Oregon craft brewers above a certain size have been bought out by the big beverage companies. In that case, did the consumer win or lose? Well, it depends entirely on what your metric is and whom you ask.
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Old 12-02-2019, 07:09 PM
 
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Deaths due to overdose from prescription drugs are on the rise.

Gupta: Let's end the prescription drug death epidemic


Quote:
It's the biggest man-made epidemic in the United States. That's how a doctor in Washington state described it to me as we sat outside the state Capitol in Olympia.

He was talking about accidental death from prescription drug overdoses. The doctor, Gary Franklin, medical director for Washington state's Department of Labor and Industries, recounted terrifying case after case and told me it was the saddest thing he had ever seen.
I remember him telling me about a teenager dying because he had taken too much narcotic medication after a dental procedure.

The most common scenario, he said, involves a man in his 40s or 50s who visits a doctor with a backache and walks out with a pain pill prescription. About three years later, typically, the man dies in his sleep from taking too many pills, or mixing them with alcohol.

They don't intend to die, but more than 20,000 times a year -- every 19 minutes, on average -- that is exactly what happens. Accidental overdoses are now a leading cause of accidental deaths in the United States, surpassing car crashes.
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Old 12-03-2019, 11:35 AM
 
Location: Myrtle Creek, Oregon
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BendLocal View Post
Deaths due to overdose from prescription drugs are on the rise.

Gupta: Let's end the prescription drug death epidemic
You notice I said accidental overdoses. I see suicides differently, and see suicide as one of those basic human rights that no government has ever been able to take away. Prescription drug overdoses are often claimed to be "accidental" for social and insurance purposes. Opioids are a peaceful and painless way to go, and if you bet the prescription overdose was intentional you won't lose many bets.
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Old 12-03-2019, 01:39 PM
 
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Characterizing Intentional & Accidental Drug Overdose Deaths

Quote:
In the US from 2000–2014, the rate of drug overdose death increased from 6.2 to 14.7 deaths per 100,0000 population. Concurrently, from 1999–2012, the rate of prescription opioid-related deaths more than tripled; in 2012 39% of drug overdose deaths involved a prescription opioid. Because the majority of these deaths are classified as accidental, public health efforts have largely focused on understanding the characteristics of unintentional drug overdose deaths.

However, 12% of drug overdose deaths in 2014 were intentionally self-inflicted (i.e., suicide by drug overdose), with this proportion remaining relatively stable from 2005–2014. Moreover, from 1999–2014, the rate of opioid-related suicide deaths doubled. This study therefore provides critical information about the characteristics of intentional overdose deaths in the US.
Quote:
While there were some similarities between self-inflicted and unintentional drug overdose deaths, self-inflicted drug overdose deaths differed from unintentional drug overdose deaths in many respects. Most notably, results showed that self-inflicted drug overdose deaths were more likely to involve antidepressants as a contributing cause of death and more likely to involve a controlled substance prescription dispensed in the weeks prior to death, suggesting potential contact with the health care system in the weeks/months leading up to death. Such contacts offer a critical opportunity for health care professionals to identify and intervene on risk factors or signs of distress and potential for self-harm among those receiving prescriptions for controlled substances.
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Old 12-03-2019, 02:01 PM
 
Location: Just outside of Portland
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I have lived in Oregon for almost all of my 70 years.

I have to honestly say, there has never, ever, been a time in my life when I couldn't just call a friend and have high quality marijuana within minutes.

But now, all I have to do is walk down down to my local corner dispensary, and cheaply buy marijuana of such quality it would boggle the mind of somebody trying to buy some weed 20 years ago.

All this hysteria about "illegal pot" is just that, hysteria.

Within five years, marijuana will be legal nationwide (like in Canada), and it will be a moot point.

99.9% of people that smoke weed will buy legal weed.

As an example, How much bootleg moonshine liquor is being sold (for a profit) nowadays?

Last edited by pdxMIKEpdx; 12-03-2019 at 02:13 PM..
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