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Old 09-11-2020, 05:29 PM
509
 
3,930 posts, read 4,815,047 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LogaKoga View Post
Oregon's income tax is more progressive than Washington's sales tax for lower income persons. Washington's sales tax is regressive, falling hardest on those who can least afford it.

In both areas overall taxation depends largely on particular counties and cities. In WA, King County and Seattle have high taxes, but also better amenities than anywhere else in the state.

Vancouver WA is very much the best of both worlds since it has neither an income nor sales tax.

No, Oregon's tax is not progressive.....IF you have a taxable income of 7,000 dollars your tax rate is 7% in Oregon. Washington's sales tax excludes food, rent, medical, etc. etc.



Whoops.....here are the actually Oregon tax tables....even worse than the original source!!


https://www.oregon.gov/dor/programs/...es_101-043.pdf

It is much better being poor in Washington than Oregon.


It is MUCH BETTER in Washington if your middle class with a low consumption lifestyle. Trust me...on this. Have three homes, retired at 56 and never made over 80,000 in family income. I couldn't do that in Oregon.


I hear you on Vancouver, but I don't mind taxes. I will pay my share. I don't like giving my money to Boeing, Amazon, etc, but I will vote for my local library system and school district.


You will have to explain the "amenities" that all my new neighbors from western Washington are giving up!!!
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Old 09-12-2020, 12:04 AM
 
256 posts, read 61,356 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 509 View Post
...It is MUCH BETTER in Washington if your middle class with a low consumption lifestyle. Trust me...on this. Have three homes, retired at 56 and never made over 80,000 in family income. I couldn't do that in Oregon.
While I don't know the specifics of your situation, Washington state has one of the least progressive taxation in the entire country while Oregon has one of the most progressive taxation. You have to look at more than just nominal tax rates. Here's a thorough analysis:

https://itep.org/whopays/
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Old 09-12-2020, 12:37 AM
 
Location: WA
4,129 posts, read 5,244,648 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 509 View Post
You will have to explain the "amenities" that all my new neighbors from western Washington are giving up!!!
You don't have the privilege of paying for three massive pro sports palaces and a subway.

Although I suspect you are paying for them to some extent.
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Old 09-13-2020, 02:18 AM
 
Location: Seattle
1,793 posts, read 2,208,846 times
Reputation: 2736
AQI numbers are higher
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Old 09-15-2020, 02:56 PM
 
Location: Unhappy Valley, Oregon
1,082 posts, read 689,976 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by texasdiver View Post
You don't have the privilege of paying for three massive pro sports palaces and a subway.

Although I suspect you are paying for them to some extent.
Subway? I feel like Portland has more of a subway under the Tualatin Mountains than Seattle. Trimet rail is so much more extensive anyway.
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Old 09-15-2020, 02:59 PM
 
Location: Unhappy Valley, Oregon
1,082 posts, read 689,976 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LogaKoga View Post
While I don't know the specifics of your situation, Washington state has one of the least progressive taxation in the entire country while Oregon has one of the most progressive taxation. You have to look at more than just nominal tax rates. Here's a thorough analysis:

https://itep.org/whopays/
It isn't really THAT progressive. It just has a LOT of taxes on rich people and FEW taxes on poor people. The actual brackets are awkward. We all basically pay 9% less any deduction. The rich get to pay 9% plus 0.9% on earnings above $125,000/$250,000. The whole 5% and 7% bracket is a silly joke. They might as well have just made it 9% flat. Not really progressive.
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Old 09-15-2020, 06:06 PM
 
Location: WA
4,129 posts, read 5,244,648 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cornsnicker3 View Post
Subway? I feel like Portland has more of a subway under the Tualatin Mountains than Seattle. Trimet rail is so much more extensive anyway.
Well, the light rail now runs underground from downtown Seattle to the U District. And it is underground entirely through downtown Seattle compared to Portland which is all above ground. So you can take the subway all the way from the University of Washington to the Seahawks stadium in Pioneer Square through 7 different subway stops. Portland only has one underground stop at the zoo.

But yes, Portland still has a larger light rail network although Seattle is fast catching up.
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Old 09-17-2020, 09:18 AM
 
Location: Unhappy Valley, Oregon
1,082 posts, read 689,976 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by texasdiver View Post
Well, the light rail now runs underground from downtown Seattle to the U District. And it is underground entirely through downtown Seattle compared to Portland which is all above ground. So you can take the subway all the way from the University of Washington to the Seahawks stadium in Pioneer Square through 7 different subway stops. Portland only has one underground stop at the zoo.

But yes, Portland still has a larger light rail network although Seattle is fast catching up.
It has been "fast catching up" since the late 60s and still manages to get whooped on light rail by a much smaller, poorer city. Seattle has really no excuse other than themselves for not having a robust light rail by now.
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Old 09-17-2020, 01:41 PM
 
Location: WA
4,129 posts, read 5,244,648 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cornsnicker3 View Post
It has been "fast catching up" since the late 60s and still manages to get whooped on light rail by a much smaller, poorer city. Seattle has really no excuse other than themselves for not having a robust light rail by now.
Seattle's Light Rail is currently 20.3 miles long and has (pre-pandemic) daily ridership of 83,000 passengers. There are additional lines currently under construction that will expand it to 57.7 miles. And an additional 54.7 miles in the planning stages for a total rail network of 113 miles if it is fully built out.

Portland's light rail system is currently 59.7 miles long with pre-pandemic daily ridership of about 120,000 passengers. There are no additional lines under construction. The proposed SW corridor line currently in the planning stages would add an additional 11 miles of track. which would create a fully built-out network of 70.7 miles. There are vague proposals to punch tunnels underground through downtown Portland like they have in Seattle, but nothing even in the actual planning stages yet.
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Old 09-17-2020, 03:00 PM
 
Location: Unhappy Valley, Oregon
1,082 posts, read 689,976 times
Reputation: 1845
Quote:
Originally Posted by texasdiver View Post
Seattle's Light Rail is currently 20.3 miles long and has (pre-pandemic) daily ridership of 83,000 passengers. There are additional lines currently under construction that will expand it to 57.7 miles. And an additional 54.7 miles in the planning stages for a total rail network of 113 miles if it is fully built out.

Portland's light rail system is currently 59.7 miles long with pre-pandemic daily ridership of about 120,000 passengers. There are no additional lines under construction. The proposed SW corridor line currently in the planning stages would add an additional 11 miles of track. which would create a fully built-out network of 70.7 miles. There are vague proposals to punch tunnels underground through downtown Portland like they have in Seattle, but nothing even in the actual planning stages yet.
I hope it all works out really. It makes sense for a larger, denser city to better use and build its light rail, especially a city flush with tech. cash. I hear I-5 daily commute is practically impossible right now.
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