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Old 04-30-2008, 02:46 PM
 
35 posts, read 107,862 times
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My husband and I will be visiting Oregon in July to scope out communities to consider for retirement a few years down the road.

We'd like to end up in a sunnier area, and avoid really extreme temperatures. We long for a water view, either lake or ocean, after a lifetime in the desert. Reasonably close golf and skiing would be nice. Small town is fine, though a decent restaurant or two would be good. Culture, schmulture - We can rent DVDs, etc. We're not very political - I hold some pretty strong beliefs, but tend not to spout off on them too often - so that's not a big factor one way or the other. I think we want what every other retiree wants - someplace reasonably safe. No chronic health issues at this point, knock wood, so close medical care isn't a huge priority.

We're starting in Seattle, tentatively planning to visit Bend, Klamath Falls, Grants Pass, Brookings.... We're covering quite a bit of ground in 5 days, but if the weather doesn't suit us in July, I figure it won't be good any other time.

Where else should we consider? Or what can you tell me about the \towns wwe're considering.
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Old 04-30-2008, 04:01 PM
 
Location: suburbia
595 posts, read 2,628,044 times
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Florence, on the coast was rated one of the best places to retire, and in return, much of it's population are older, retired folk. It seems like a pretty neat, laid back kind of town. We took a stroll through Old Town, while I was there. Many cool little shops to visit, and i noticed that most of the shop owners were older.

The actual "downtown" area of Florence is on a river, but just east of it is the beach with homes on it. Just south of town are the Oregon Dunes. A pretty nice place to spend the day. Florence is also the closest coastel town to Eugene, so the city is just a short drive away.

I do not know much about skiing and golfing in the area, other than Bandon Dunes are down south in Bandon. It's been rated one of the best golf courses in the country.

You should check out Bandon, too. It's another really neat town.
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Old 04-30-2008, 04:10 PM
 
35 posts, read 107,862 times
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I suppose I should add that we'll be - or at least I will be - on the young side for a retiree. (He'll be 60 by the time we move, I'll be 51-52). So we're not necessarily looking for a senior community or a bunch of "old" people - I feel much too young to even be contemplating this (45 now).
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Old 04-30-2008, 04:24 PM
 
Location: suburbia
595 posts, read 2,628,044 times
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Well, I'm not saying that EVERYONE in Florence are retired. I'm just saying there were alot of them. There are still plenty of middle aged people there.

If you're not interested in Florence, I'd still recomend checking out Bandon, Newport, Cannon Beach, Yaughts (probably didnt spell that right!), pretty much any sity on the coast.

However, if there were any to stay AWAY from, I'd say Seaside. Its a very touristy town.
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Old 04-30-2008, 10:20 PM
 
Location: Oregon
177 posts, read 925,346 times
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If you have time, check out Hood River in the gorge. It's on the eastern side of the Cascade mountain range, so it is sunnier. I have to caution you though, it is windy there and home prices are climbing. Hood River is on the Columbia River (no houses right along the river though, just businesses) you can get a house with a river view, it will cost more of course. There is a golf course there (I don't golf so I can't tell you if it's a good one or not) and it's only about 20-30 miles to Mt. Hood (skiing). It's a small town,so it has some nice little shops, only one 'big box' store (Wal-Mart). It does have a local grocery store (Rosauers) and a big Safeway. Portland is only 60 miles to the west. It's a beautiful area, especially this time of year when the fruit trees are in bloom. Oh, I forgot to mention the wonderful fresh local fruit available there in the summer (apples, cherries, pears, blueberries, etc.).
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Old 05-01-2008, 12:32 AM
 
Location: Southwest Washington
2,317 posts, read 7,338,475 times
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Based on your criteria I'd definitely recommend the Rogue Valley... Medford, Ashland, or Grants Pass. All three cities are consistently rated as top places to live or retire. The area is sunnier than many areas of Western Oregon and doesn't have very extreme climate. It's definitely not the desert (unlike Bend or Klamath Falls), and Grants Pass has the greenest landscape of the three with the Rogue River running through the city. There's skiing at Mount Ashland just outside of Ashland and golf courses in and around all three cities. Ashland and Grants Pass are definitely home to a lot of nice, upscale restaurants in the downtown areas. I should say that Ashland's housing is a bit on the spendy side though, of the three. And I know you said you said culture schmulture, but there is a surprisingly great deal of it in the area, Farmer's Markets, Britt Music Festival, Oregon Shakespeare Festival, local theatre, art galleries, etc.

On the coast, Bandon and Newport are also very nice cities if you want a milder, though less sunny, climate and the beautiful ocean views. Bandon is a bit touristy, but not much more than the rest of the coast. Definitely a great place.
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Old 05-01-2008, 05:28 PM
 
Location: Portland, Oregon
543 posts, read 1,074,222 times
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In July, the weather should be sun every day. (After this odd spring, I don't want to be making any "guarantees" :-)... but.. Anywhere you go should be excellent.... Crater Lake is wonderful - Driving the Mt. Hood Loop is wonderful... through orchards, fresh fruit and berry stands as well as mountain and Columbia Gorge/river views. Hood River is one of the most famous Wind Surfing area in the world and in the summer people come from all over (No... it isn't crazy crowded - just lively).

Bend reminds me of a small Denver... high dessert... It isn't too far from Sisters.. a very quaint small town near the mountains. Beautiful views. If it gets too hot, you can probably drive up and enjoy playing in some snow and it won't take too long.

There are also the John Day Fossil Beds.. I know it will be hard to see as much as you want in only 5 days!! Be sure to find some time to just sit and watch. Best wishes!

Astoria is north of Seaside a few miles and a very historic place. There is a wonderful tower that one can climb up to look across the Columbia, the ocean, bays, etc. Astoria was a fishing/logging town and has taken some economic hits, but there are very cool Victorian neighborhoods on the hills. There, even in July, you may experience some cloudy days.

Depending on your time... Ashland is well known for it's Shakespeare festival, galleries, in a high desert sort of town. The days there and in Bend tend to be warmer than Portland or the coast... and the nights a bit cooler. Medford is not my fav.. large, growing fast, just reminds me more of a midwest town.

If you can catch some Rogue River action, (exits on the southern coast) you may enjoy that. There are several areas to take various types of motorized and non motorized tours. Can have some amazing white water in the spring... not sure how much it calms down in the summer...

An easy stop, but very touristy is stopping in to see Multnomah Falls.. right off I-84 (You can see it from the highway), about 20 minutes from Portland. The pull is that it is so convenient - and no matter how often I go and no matter how many people are there.. once you're on that bridge staring at the water, it doesn't matter. It is quite spectacular.. Also, there are clean enough restrooms, gift shop that isn't too expensive, and a restaurant. Hope that helps... To see some pictures you can go to PBase.com and do a search for specific things... like Multnomah Falls, or Crater Lake, etc.. There are some pictures on other photography based sites as well... Photobucket, and msn also have that available.
best wishes
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Old 05-01-2008, 10:00 PM
 
35 posts, read 107,862 times
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I drove through the Gorge last fall, and it seemed like as soon as it got green, it got gloomy, but I suppose it's worth at least passing through again.

Chances are, if anywhere is really gloomy even in July, it's a no sale.

Decisions, decisions. If we had a couple of weeks for this trip, it'd be different.
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Old 05-02-2008, 12:56 AM
 
Location: K-Falls, south side
3 posts, read 8,631 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by planning4someday View Post
I drove through the Gorge last fall, and it seemed like as soon as it got green, it got gloomy, but I suppose it's worth at least passing through again.

Chances are, if anywhere is really gloomy even in July, it's a no sale.

Decisions, decisions. If we had a couple of weeks for this trip, it'd be different.
You sound much too picky to live in Oregon. Perhaps try California, they are very picky and sensitive. Oregon is more laid back. We don't need anymore slow, old, picky people driving around town with nothing better to do than slow down traffic and call the zoning department on my show. Thanks for asking though...
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Old 05-02-2008, 06:22 AM
 
Location: Oregon
177 posts, read 925,346 times
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If you think the gorge is "gloomy" in the fall then you can forget Western Oregon because it is even more "gloomy" than the gorge. BTW: you were probably in Cascade Locks when it got "gloomy". It can be sunny everywhere else and be raining in Cascade Locks. Oregon does get rainy and we get "gloomy" days especially in the fall and winter, it even snows in the gorge. If you are looking for very little rainy/gloomy days then you need to concentrate on central and eastern oregon. Places like Bend, or Pendleton/LaGrande.
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