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Old 12-31-2020, 07:02 PM
 
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People will always find a reason to be bigoted against someone else. There are good and bad people everywhere.


If Oregon is getting a lot of Cal -Berkeley and Stanford grads that has to be a good thing. If its all street people that probably doesn't help the state too much.
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Old 12-31-2020, 07:19 PM
 
Location: WA
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Quote:
Originally Posted by WestGuest View Post
People will always find a reason to be bigoted against someone else. There are good and bad people everywhere.


If Oregon is getting a lot of Cal -Berkeley and Stanford grads that has to be a good thing. If its all street people that probably doesn't help the state too much.
We get them both. Plus the motorcycle gangs too. There's no one doing screening at the border.
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Old 12-31-2020, 08:46 PM
 
Location: Vancouver, WA
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Originally Posted by NW4me View Post
Thanks, Mtn Surfer! That online map is a great resource.

It looks like the entire Willamette Valley and coast range are comparatively-safe areas.
This year the valley still got heavy smoke from the fires in the Cascades, though.
Is that unusual? Are the prevailing winds normally eastward, so they'd carry
the smoke over the Cascades, instead of west and southwest to the Valley?
I think long time residents would have better insight into your questions. From our 2 year experience living here during fire season, one summer/fall was fantastic and this past one got really bad for breathability toward the end of it. There were some bad fires that wiped out towns and forests. Portland had some of the most unhealthy air in the world for a period of time among other areas within the state.

I'm not sure if anywhere is 100% immune from it. Though there are certainly areas at higher risk than others. The winds can vary a lot. During the worst of it, we had northeast wind blowing smoke directly from the fire in the mountains into Portland/Vancouver.

If you think about the winds in CA near coastal cities (LA, SD, SF) its predominantly 'onshore (west).' But during fire season when its hot and dry, the winds can switch and we get those hot 'devil winds' that whip through from inland (east). Similar things can happen in the PNW.

Derek
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Old 12-31-2020, 08:59 PM
 
Location: WA
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MtnSurfer View Post
I think long time residents would have better insight into your questions. From our 2 year experience living here during fire season, one summer/fall was fantastic and this past one got really bad for breathability toward the end of it. There were some bad fires that wiped out towns and forests. Portland had some of the most unhealthy air in the world for a period of time among other areas within the state.

I'm not sure if anywhere is 100% immune from it. Though there are certainly areas at higher risk than others. The winds can vary a lot. During the worst of it, we had northeast wind blowing smoke directly from the fire in the mountains into Portland/Vancouver.

If you think about the winds in CA near coastal cities (LA, SD, SF) its predominantly 'onshore (west).' But during fire season when its hot and dry, the winds can switch and we get those hot 'devil winds' that whip through from inland (east). Similar things can happen in the PNW.

Derek
This year was the worst fire year in the Pacific Northwest since the Yacolt Burn in 1902: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Yacolt_Burn

The only question is whether it was a freak 1 in 100 year phenomenon, or represents a shift to a new fire regime due to climate change. Or maybe a little of both. I don't think anyone knows the answer. But the August fire storms we had were certainly freak storms. Here in Camas the winds were so strong that large trees were getting snapped off at the base from the force. I've never seen that happen before in my life. Winter storms sometimes turn trees over when the soils are saturated and soft. But I've never seen it in the summer when the soils are rock hard and the trees are getting snapped off 10' up due to the force. It is pretty hard to control fires when it is 100 degrees, bone dry, and the wind is blowing at 50 mph.
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Old 12-31-2020, 09:20 PM
 
Location: Vancouver, WA
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Originally Posted by texasdiver View Post
Bend has a lot of Californians too. But it is also extremely popular with Oregonians. I expect everyone in the Portland metro knows people who have retired to Bend or Redmond and/or who have vacation homes in places like Sun River or Black Butte or similar places. Just within my FB network of PTA, soccer, and band parents there are probably 6 families who have weekend places in Sun River. But hardly anyone knows anyone who has moved to Ashland or southern OR.
Bend is very unique for a PNW town. Can you think of anywhere else like it within OR or WA - a growing, thriving, somewhat upscale, outdoor enthusiast community? I think they even have some small colleges like OSU Cascades. I could imagine that expanding also. Think of how many students a full sized college campus would attract.

It reminds me of places like Boulder just below RMNP, Mammoth, Tahoe and even a bit like Monterey where we moved from. Just switch out the ocean for mountains and rivers. There is a similar vibe which attracts the young, retirees as well as plenty of tourists. Its very bike friendly which is something we do miss while living in Monterey. I think its also the fastest growing town in the PNW.

Derek
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Old 12-31-2020, 09:57 PM
 
Location: WA
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MtnSurfer View Post
Bend is very unique for a PNW town. Can you think of anywhere else like it within OR or WA - a growing, thriving, somewhat upscale, outdoor enthusiast community? I think they even have some small colleges like OSU Cascades. I could imagine that expanding also. Think of how many students a full sized college campus would attract.

It reminds me of places like Boulder just below RMNP, Mammoth, Tahoe and even a bit like Monterey where we moved from. Just switch out the ocean for mountains and rivers. There is a similar vibe which attracts the young, retirees as well as plenty of tourists. Its very bike friendly which is something we do miss while living in Monterey. I think its also the fastest growing town in the PNW.

Derek
Bellingham and Corvallis are probably the closest places but neither is seeing the explosive growth and money that Bend is getting. I sort of expect that Wenatchee will be the "next Bend" but it has a ways to go yet.

I can't really think of any other cities anywhere in the US that are exactly like Bend. Boulder has a massive research university and is virtually a Denver suburb so has much more economic reason to exist. Santa Fe is a state capital and 500-year capital of the region. Bend isn't really even a ski town like Tahoe. Bachelor is 45 min away during peak season.

Bend just doesn't really have any logical reason to exist in its current form. At least not that I can see. It just feels like an enormous bubble waiting to burst.
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Old 12-31-2020, 10:35 PM
 
Location: Portland, Oregon
10,665 posts, read 18,050,097 times
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Back in the day... really back in the day, California got a bad name in Oreogn.

First: we had land use issues, we needed to constrain development to provide for public services. California grew without any plan. We wanted to preserve prime agricultural land. California, particularly the Bay Area, was paving over orchards. "Don't Californicate Oregon" was a slogan for many.

Second: California immigrants were driving up home prices. Mind you that the sellers weren't complaining but many observed that they could no longer afford to buy homes. California wages were much higher than Oregon wages and Californians were selling their homes for prices much higher than comparable homes here.

Third: Californians were more aggressive drivers than the locals. They were accustomed to competitive driving in urban areas, "California driver!" was an epithet thrown by children who barely survived crossing the street. Note that this difference in driving style is still an issue with new residents.

Those were the issues that just came to my mind.

Although it isn't an issue today Californians would be wise to put local license plates on their cars promptly. Our registrations are much cheaper than California so there is no economic reason not to.
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Old 12-31-2020, 10:55 PM
 
2,172 posts, read 578,845 times
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California culture is dog-eat-dog. I moved there from Oregon for five years and saw a change coming over me that I didn't like. I drove back to Oregon a few times to visit family and had a few strange experiences with passive aggressive behavior that I attributed to my California plates. California culture finally got to me and I left, vowing to never live there again.

It's touch-and-go now whether Oregon culture is going to be able to survive the great northward migration. I don't think it will.
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Old 12-31-2020, 11:28 PM
 
Location: WA
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Originally Posted by mathlete View Post
California culture is dog-eat-dog. I moved there from Oregon for five years and saw a change coming over me that I didn't like. I drove back to Oregon a few times to visit family and had a few strange experiences with passive aggressive behavior that I attributed to my California plates. California culture finally got to me and I left, vowing to never live there again.

It's touch-and-go now whether Oregon culture is going to be able to survive the great northward migration. I don't think it will.
I think in the past, regional distinctions were much greater than they are today. We didn't have the internet and brands and customs were much more regional.

These days I think we are changing from regional differences to urban/rural differences. Seattle, Portland, Sacramento, San Francisco, and San Diego are all pretty similar. Same stores and restaurants, same traffic, same jobs, etc. etc. What is changing is the growing chasm between rural and urban America. These days Beaverton has MUCH more in common with Silicon Valley or Bellevue WA than it does with Rosburg or Burns or Coos Bay. And small rural towns in CA have MUCH more in common with their OR counterparts than the big nearby cities.
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Old 01-01-2021, 12:02 AM
 
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A sure fire way to really **** people off I've seen when I lived in Oregon, and it was a hot bed angry issue in the 1990s- a California resident would sell their McMansion in LA or something, move to Oregon flush with lots of cash and buy or build a huge outlandish house in Oregon- overpaying for it because the sellers see them coming with lots of money from rich California, and then because of them EVERYONE's property taxes near by gets hiked up, because of the way the system is rigged to go by recent home sales to assess home VALUES, so you figure in an area of $75,000 houses some jerk builds a $2 million McMansion on 20 acres, they assess that value and re-assess the values on everyone else around there.

I'm glad I live in the small midwest town of 1,700 I do, nothing changes, no corporate offices/ 200,000 sq ft production plants come in here, rich people dont come in and overpay on a couple of $25,000 houses on adjacent lots, tear them down and build a 10,000 sq ft monstrosity that raises everyones' taxes and home prices like they do elsewhere!


I bought my 2 bedroom 1100 sq ft 1930 farmhouse with full basement, on 1/2 acre in 1998 for $7,900, the annual tax is around $200, definitely dont need people moving in around here raising everyones' taxes!


People here are working stiffs, farmers or retired, nobody drives a BMW or has a $500,000 house with a 4 car garage here and that's how we like it.
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Last edited by Sculptor; 01-01-2021 at 12:14 AM..
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