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Old 06-17-2010, 03:29 PM
 
2 posts, read 8,222 times
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Hey everyone I just came across your posts but I see they are almost 2 1/2 years old. I was wondering how it went for those thinking of getting a teaching job in Oregon. I am going to graduate soon and live in Ohio. I am looking at the Corvallis area. If anyone has any info on teaching there and just that area in general that would be great. Thanks everyone.
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Old 06-18-2010, 01:44 PM
 
Location: State of Jefferson coast
963 posts, read 2,755,880 times
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The 2007 postings would be seen as very optimistic by today's standards. The teaching profession is in a death spiral here in Oregon due to chronic funding problems and long-term enrollment decline. A lot of competent and successful teachers have been riffed in recent years. Moving here to teach is risky because even if you are offered a job, you might be told at the end of your first or second year that the district is not in a postion to offer you a contract for the next year. Since you would be a probationary teacher, they have no real obligation to try and keep you on or find another position for you in the district.

You'll have A LOT of competition in Corvallis as there is a huge population of unemployed teachers subbing there hoping to get a foot in the door. A friend who works in administration told me that it's typical for the district to get 300-400 applications for every opening. Everyone wants to teach in the districts where there is good community support for teaching.
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Old 06-19-2010, 03:43 PM
 
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As someone who did obtain a teaching job in Oregon from out of state years ago, I also want to warn those thinking of doing such that Oregon is one of the more difficult states for an out-of-stater to obtain a license in. Unless it's changed (check DOE website for current regs) there is none or very little reciprocity.

Most out of staters I know were in a shortage area and were hired with the district requesting an emergency temporary license for the new hire. You'll have a certain length of time to obtain a regular license with requirements varying from person to person depending upon their education and experience.

Many out of staters, such as myself, get hired into very remote, rural districts. A lot of people have difficulty with how remote or small some of the towns are and don't last long. (Personally, I loved it and prefer it any day over a city school district.) It is usually easier to get into these types of districts rather than places such as Corvallis as there are fewer people willing to live in such remote places.

With the current budget and job issues, it is even more difficult for those out of state to get hired in given the increased supply of teachers already there.
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Old 07-02-2010, 03:45 PM
 
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Thanks so much for the info. Although I'm a little bummed out now. I really had my heart set on that area, it sounds and looks so beautiful. As far as the teaching in a remote area I would have no problem with that at all. We live in a rural area now and I was actually dreading the 50,000 population of Corvallis. I've read up on the hoop jumping to obtain a license for out of staters and was surprised to find that Oregon doen't participate with 39 other states that view Ohio licenses as basically the same as theirs. If you don't mind could you suggest some of the remote areas you were speaking of. If I can't get into Corvallis that's ok but I don't want to give up on Oregon completely. I've never actually been there but I know people who have and they say that the mentality of the people there is very different than where I'm from and that's what I'm looking for, more environmental awareness and such. Thanks again for the advice if there is anything anyone would like to add I would really appreciate it.
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Old 07-02-2010, 06:53 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ShawneeD View Post
Thanks so much for the info. Although I'm a little bummed out now. I really had my heart set on that area, it sounds and looks so beautiful. As far as the teaching in a remote area I would have no problem with that at all. We live in a rural area now and I was actually dreading the 50,000 population of Corvallis. I've read up on the hoop jumping to obtain a license for out of staters and was surprised to find that Oregon doen't participate with 39 other states that view Ohio licenses as basically the same as theirs. If you don't mind could you suggest some of the remote areas you were speaking of. If I can't get into Corvallis that's ok but I don't want to give up on Oregon completely. I've never actually been there but I know people who have and they say that the mentality of the people there is very different than where I'm from and that's what I'm looking for, more environmental awareness and such. Thanks again for the advice if there is anything anyone would like to add I would really appreciate it.
No, Oregon didn't participate with any of the 5 other states with which I had licenses either...

As far as where...pull out a map and start looking at small, small towns. There are still small schools that have maybe 3-4 teachers for a k-8. The ones that generally often had a tougher time attracting people are small districts in eastern Oregon...maybe more accurately-- is attracting people that stay.

I was in eastern Oregon...desert country. Once I became an administrator and had to hire teachers, I found that we had better luck finding teachers who would stick from places like Nevada, Utah instead of even the west side of Oregon. Many people just had a tough time with the isolation and living in a place that I've heard described as looking like the moon and we found that lots of people used to rain and green generally didn't stay. Not all, but most.

If at all possible, I would visit before I made a leap like that. While I was from out of state, I was from a nearby state, similar country and community and had family scattered all over Oregon so had some reference. Coming straight out of Ohio into, say Frenchglen, or Ukiah or Condon or Wheeler or Monument could be tough. Not saying a thing bad about those places (I like each one!), but it would probably be some culture shock...

Where in Ohio are you and what is your license going to be in? If you can get a job in Ohio and still want to come to Oregon, it would increase your odds of pulling it off if you had some experience. Also, I would save some money for a trip to Oregon and see for yourself first-hand if it's something you really want to pursue...

Below is what everyone who's never been thinks Oregon looks like--and obviously, some of it does...
http://www.strengthinperspective.com/mpfindor/mpgal41/webpix/Three-Sisters-Mountains.jpg (broken link)


What much of Oregon really looks like--

http://hphotos-snc3.fbcdn.net/hs188.snc3/19557_220732763726_560663726_3168301_3149367_n.jpg (broken link)



Please feel free to DM if you have any specific questions...
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Old 07-02-2010, 10:51 PM
 
10 posts, read 31,991 times
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Those picture of what people think Oregon looks like and what it really is reminded me of my perception of Washington State when I first moved there. Thought it was all Mt Rainier and Seattle and then ended up in Kennewick..( I was from the Midwest). That was a rude awakening.

I want to find a teaching job in Washington but it's been tough here too.. But now after reading this post I'm very apprehensive to move to Salem and then be told I'm not going to get renewed next year due to budget cuts. I don't want to move all the way over there only to be turned away with no contract next June. (that happened to me here in Spokane and it's horrible-- I had lived here for years, went to Gonzaga for my Master and teaching certificate then got a job in Seattle but didn't like it there..so I took a job offer in Spokane, moved back...and then lovely budget cuts came and ruined it...)
The Salem Keizer District has been interested in me from day one when I met them at a recruitment fair in Tacoma. They told me they need bilingual teachers and I'm fluent in Spanish. The positions they want me for are bilingual classrooms. They even said they have a mentor program and would pay for me to get my bilingual endoresment from Willamette University. Sounds like a good deal. Is this a stable school district? What is the reputation? A lady I know in Spokane told me her friend's son works for Salem Keizer and loves it. So I don't know. Would teaching in Oregon for a few years hurt my chances of getting a teaching job again in Washington? (I've become a true Washingtonion at heart after years of living here.)
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Old 07-03-2010, 11:27 AM
 
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I don't think teaching in Oregon for a few years will hurt you in Washington. Depending upon the district, what can hurt a teacher with experience is the fact they're higher on the pay scale...

Your fear of losing a job due to budget cuts in Oregon is a legitimate fear...and unfortunately with the economy as it currently is, is a fear that shouldn't be limited to Oregon only. Your experience in Spokane is happening everywhere.

Your Spanish skills should make you more marketable. Are you an ESL teacher, or in another area? If you can teach in Spanish, (or teach Spanish, or teach ESL) I'd would be doing some research on districts with a high number of spanish-speaking students.

If you're set on Oregon, I'd be looking at Hermiston, Umatilla, Morrow County (Boardman) schools--each with a high proportion of hispanic students. Having lived in Kennewick, those areas shouldn't be any jolt to you in their moon-like appearance. Heck, I knew a couple of teachers that taught there and still lived in Tri-Cities.

Good luck in Salem--or Connell.
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Old 07-03-2010, 05:16 PM
 
Location: Salem, OR
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We don't have enough bilingual teachers here in Salem. While we are going to face an ongoing round of budget cuts next year, I think they are having a hard time finding qualified people for those bilingual spots. About 15% of Salem is Hispanic and we have one of the larger percentages of Hispanics in Salem for the bigger cities.

While no guarantees, I think you'd be okay job wise. There aren't enough bilingual teachers in the school district.
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Old 02-03-2012, 05:36 AM
 
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I Hafta disagree with pdx mom. Pps is a terrible school district unless u live in a wealthy neighborhood, which from the sound of the ages of her teachers and dedication of the parents she does. As a new teacher in Pps u will not be working at alameda or duniway, e.g. but rather at a poor school (demographically speaking) with little parental involvement. Beaverton or even David Douglas school district are better options for a young teacher starting out in Portland, or Clark county schools. Cut ur teeth there than move to Portland d with some experience. Plus u will have a very high likelihood of being laid off/ eternally subbing in pdx. My neighbor is a new teacher and he had the choice of being a high school teacher at David Douglas ( in the DD district) or being one at Jefferson (the worst school in PPS) NEEDLESS TO SAY, he chose the former and has been exceedingly happy with that choice. Teaching is a tough gig in this economy, do urself a favor and don't start out in PPS.
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Old 02-03-2012, 12:28 PM
 
47 posts, read 79,524 times
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I must respectfully disagree. Working at a challenging school is one of the best ways to learn how to be an effective teacher. I've worked in higher income schools with over-privileged students and rinky-dink teachers who ride the status of their school, but I prefer teaching students with real struggles and working with teachers committed to making a difference.
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