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Old 10-01-2009, 01:52 PM
 
Location: OUTTA SIGHT!
3,023 posts, read 3,092,594 times
Reputation: 1899

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Quote:
Originally Posted by John Shaft View Post
You say there's no redneck presence in Oregon.

I say Aloha, Tillamook, Prineville, Madras, Terrebonne, and a double handful of farming/logging towns on the west side of the Cascades, plus tiny ranching towns on the east side.

Portland is proud of its progressive/liberal/socialist/urban snobbery bent, but compared to Washington and California, Oregon is definitely the most redneck-ish of the three.
What about the Survivalist groups in SW Oregon?
Not quite Hillbillies, definitely not teenagers, but frighteningly conservative perhaps.
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Old 10-01-2009, 01:53 PM
 
Location: Mountains of Oregon
16,215 posts, read 19,217,820 times
Reputation: 12021
Nice dog...

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Old 10-01-2009, 02:46 PM
 
739 posts, read 1,697,021 times
Reputation: 813
I wouldn't describe Oregon as 'rednecky'. Parts of the state have blight, as do most states. Overall I'd say it was progressive and the people are realistic.
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Old 10-07-2009, 02:14 PM
 
9 posts, read 31,658 times
Reputation: 43
Hey, MitchArk87, I lived in Corvallis for years and years and after graduating from OSU, I went to WOU and received my M.S. in Rehab Counseling: Deafness from there!! It is a great school, a small school, and Monmouth is a very tiny town. The commute from Corvallis to Monmouth takes about 30 minutes, right up 99W.
As for Oregon being a haven for rednecks? Where did you hear that? There are small towns in Oregon which, like small towns everywhere, are conservative and lean far to the right. Hunting and fishing are pretty popular activites in Oregon. However, the most populous cities and towns in Oregon definitely lean left to far left in their political and social outlooks. Not only Portland, but Eugene jump out as hotbeds of liberal activity. Eugene's nickname is the People's Republic of Eugene and has some of the most radical thinking of any city in the US. It is also home to a large hippy population, both old 60's radicals as well as young people who've adopted the lifestyle. Corvallis is very progressive, as is Ashland in southern Oregon. One thing to think about when looking at Oregon from the outside is that the state is in the process of evolving from what it once was, to something else that is yet to be determined. Historically, Oregon depended on resource extraction (like timber harvesting, farming, ranching) for its economic growth, and places that are resource-based tend to be conservative. However, Oregon has experienced a huge influx of outsiders in the last 25 years, which has changed the outlook and "feel" of most places in the state. When new people come in with new ideas and new ways of looking at things, a place evolves to incorporate these new perspectives. Oregon continues to absorb large numbers of people from all over the US, and these people either find a place where they fit in or begin to change the town they adopt in large and small ways. Locals may not like this change, but it occurs all the time. I think you could look at Oregon as a work in progress. Some places already have really distinct personalities (Portland, Eugene) that absorb newcomers, while other places (say, Grants Pass or Roseburg) were solidly one thing, but are now becoming something else, depending on who moves into the area.
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Old 10-07-2009, 11:02 PM
 
Location: Pluto's Home Town
9,986 posts, read 12,399,453 times
Reputation: 5650
Well, I've seen a lot of hillbillies with dreadlocks...does that count?

But seriously, if you are another easterner looking to move to Oregon because you are "too cool" for all the hillbilly, redneck, mouth-breathing banjo pickers in your home state, please move along, we don't need anymore whiners running from their problems! With 14% unemployment, we have plenty of our own already. Truth be told we do have rednecks, hillbillies, rastaposeur hobos, real hobos, yuppies, racists, flower children, bikers, ecofeminazis, angry white men, cholos, gangbangers, baby boomers, and feisty indians. Not sure what you are hoping not to find, but I assure you, it is here. But if you want to come and check it out, get a degree, take the good and bad, and make Oregon better, come on over!

I think WOU sounds like a nice little school in a small unpretentious town. You could do well there. Silver Falls State Park a few mile east of there is national park quality in my opinion. A lovely area.
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Old 10-09-2009, 06:43 AM
 
Location: Pluto's Home Town
9,986 posts, read 12,399,453 times
Reputation: 5650
Quote:
Originally Posted by oregonstateofmind View Post
Hey, MitchArk87, I lived in Corvallis for years and years and after graduating from OSU, I went to WOU and received my M.S. in Rehab Counseling: Deafness from there!! It is a great school, a small school, and Monmouth is a very tiny town. The commute from Corvallis to Monmouth takes about 30 minutes, right up 99W.
As for Oregon being a haven for rednecks? Where did you hear that? There are small towns in Oregon which, like small towns everywhere, are conservative and lean far to the right. Hunting and fishing are pretty popular activites in Oregon. However, the most populous cities and towns in Oregon definitely lean left to far left in their political and social outlooks. Not only Portland, but Eugene jump out as hotbeds of liberal activity. Eugene's nickname is the People's Republic of Eugene and has some of the most radical thinking of any city in the US. It is also home to a large hippy population, both old 60's radicals as well as young people who've adopted the lifestyle. Corvallis is very progressive, as is Ashland in southern Oregon. One thing to think about when looking at Oregon from the outside is that the state is in the process of evolving from what it once was, to something else that is yet to be determined. Historically, Oregon depended on resource extraction (like timber harvesting, farming, ranching) for its economic growth, and places that are resource-based tend to be conservative. However, Oregon has experienced a huge influx of outsiders in the last 25 years, which has changed the outlook and "feel" of most places in the state. When new people come in with new ideas and new ways of looking at things, a place evolves to incorporate these new perspectives. Oregon continues to absorb large numbers of people from all over the US, and these people either find a place where they fit in or begin to change the town they adopt in large and small ways. Locals may not like this change, but it occurs all the time. I think you could look at Oregon as a work in progress. Some places already have really distinct personalities (Portland, Eugene) that absorb newcomers, while other places (say, Grants Pass or Roseburg) were solidly one thing, but are now becoming something else, depending on who moves into the area.
Outstanding post! Very succinct and thoughtful assessment of Oregon.
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Old 10-09-2009, 03:25 PM
 
Location: OUTTA SIGHT!
3,023 posts, read 3,092,594 times
Reputation: 1899
Quote:
Originally Posted by oregonstateofmind View Post
Hey, MitchArk87, I lived in Corvallis for years and years and after graduating from OSU, I went to WOU and received my M.S. in Rehab Counseling: Deafness from there!! It is a great school, a small school, and Monmouth is a very tiny town. The commute from Corvallis to Monmouth takes about 30 minutes, right up 99W.
As for Oregon being a haven for rednecks? Where did you hear that? There are small towns in Oregon which, like small towns everywhere, are conservative and lean far to the right. Hunting and fishing are pretty popular activites in Oregon. However, the most populous cities and towns in Oregon definitely lean left to far left in their political and social outlooks. Not only Portland, but Eugene jump out as hotbeds of liberal activity. Eugene's nickname is the People's Republic of Eugene and has some of the most radical thinking of any city in the US. It is also home to a large hippy population, both old 60's radicals as well as young people who've adopted the lifestyle. Corvallis is very progressive, as is Ashland in southern Oregon. One thing to think about when looking at Oregon from the outside is that the state is in the process of evolving from what it once was, to something else that is yet to be determined. Historically, Oregon depended on resource extraction (like timber harvesting, farming, ranching) for its economic growth, and places that are resource-based tend to be conservative. However, Oregon has experienced a huge influx of outsiders in the last 25 years, which has changed the outlook and "feel" of most places in the state. When new people come in with new ideas and new ways of looking at things, a place evolves to incorporate these new perspectives. Oregon continues to absorb large numbers of people from all over the US, and these people either find a place where they fit in or begin to change the town they adopt in large and small ways. Locals may not like this change, but it occurs all the time. I think you could look at Oregon as a work in progress. Some places already have really distinct personalities (Portland, Eugene) that absorb newcomers, while other places (say, Grants Pass or Roseburg) were solidly one thing, but are now becoming something else, depending on who moves into the area.
But could use a few deft strokes of the 'Enter" button. (I.E. breaks in the message to make it easier to read that one giant block of non-stop verbiage.)
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Old 10-09-2009, 03:32 PM
 
Location: where the moss is taking over the villages
2,179 posts, read 5,077,130 times
Reputation: 1245
One may wish to defer statements here if done for benefit of OP. OP seems to be considering attending school in Illinois now, according to more recent posts.
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Old 10-09-2009, 04:37 PM
 
Location: OUTTA SIGHT!
3,023 posts, read 3,092,594 times
Reputation: 1899
Hummm...well, I guess you can have an oregonstateofmind anywhere you want.
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