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Old 12-11-2007, 08:54 PM
 
Location: New York
371 posts, read 1,944,583 times
Reputation: 258

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Quote:
Originally Posted by summers19 View Post
In regards to my son's usual disposition...he is typically quiet, reserved, and serious at times. He is very well liked by his teachers, peers, and administration at the school. He received good grades for academics AND excellent remarks about his behavior at school. The more I read what people are saying, the more I'm inclined to think that we definitely WON'T have a pinata next year, that he WAS loaded up on sugar and expectations, and that overall, he's a great kid that usually DOES respond well to verbal redirection and consequences (toys taken away, sent to his room, and more I can't think of because it's 10:40pm). He's a very sensitive child and I love that about him. Thanks for everyones' opinions. They've been helpful and eye-opening.
Rock on Summers!! You are your child's best advocate and I applaud you. Don't hesitate on posting again if you need opinions because whether they're good or bad you'll receive a wagon load. Keep up the great parenting and we all know what its like when we have a "day" as you and your son had.
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Old 12-12-2007, 05:00 AM
 
Location: In the sunshine on a ship with a plank
3,413 posts, read 8,511,732 times
Reputation: 2257
I think Summers is very perceptive and won't let her child get out of hand. Like I said, if there were real problems with his upbringing she would not have bothered to post here- instead she would have made excuses for his behavior and given him his way.

I don't think such behavior is a sign of things to come as long as it's dealt with and not the norm. Clearly it's not the norm for this little guy.
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Old 12-12-2007, 05:23 AM
 
Location: NJ
20,896 posts, read 28,611,082 times
Reputation: 24075
Quote:
Originally Posted by Homewardbound66 View Post
The very best advice written yet so far! Kudos to you and thank you for putting your 2 cents in!!!
Thank you

Quote:
Originally Posted by summers19 View Post
In regards to my son's usual disposition...he is typically quiet, reserved, and serious at times. He is very well liked by his teachers, peers, and administration at the school. He received good grades for academics AND excellent remarks about his behavior at school. The more I read what people are saying, the more I'm inclined to think that we definitely WON'T have a pinata next year, that he WAS loaded up on sugar and expectations, and that overall, he's a great kid that usually DOES respond well to verbal redirection and consequences (toys taken away, sent to his room, and more I can't think of because it's 10:40pm). He's a very sensitive child and I love that about him. Thanks for everyones' opinions. They've been helpful and eye-opening.
I was also going to say he was probably sugared out but forgot to add it.

Pinata's can be fun... last party that I was at that had one, the older kids (12ish) let the little ones (1 - 7) do the hitting. The mother made sure everyone had the same amount of stuff from it, except for the very little ones. She did this since a few of the kids didn't know to run to grab the candy / toys that fell out.
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Old 12-12-2007, 07:03 AM
 
Location: huh?
3,099 posts, read 2,397,352 times
Reputation: 511
he's only six! he will grow out of his fits.
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Old 12-13-2007, 10:47 AM
 
Location: Chicago's burbs
1,016 posts, read 4,384,733 times
Reputation: 918
Quote:
Originally Posted by summers19 View Post
What the hell???? I thought six year olds shouldn't act like that? I think my son may be emotionally behind? He acted like a two year old.
Don't worry, I don't think your son is emotionally behind. Many 6-year-olds haven't outgrown the tantrum phase yet. I have almost 6-year-old twin nephews and they still have the occasional meltdown/tantrum. My sister-in-law gives them time-outs or sends them to their room for the negative behavior. I think a combination of consistent disipline and the child outgrowing the behavior will fix the issue. 6 is still pretty young.
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Old 12-13-2007, 11:02 AM
 
394 posts, read 1,927,719 times
Reputation: 260
Quote:
Originally Posted by sbd78 View Post
Don't worry, I don't think your son is emotionally behind. Many 6-year-olds haven't outgrown the tantrum phase yet. I have almost 6-year-old twin nephews and they still have the occasional meltdown/tantrum. My sister-in-law gives them time-outs or sends them to their room for the negative behavior. I think a combination of consistent disipline and the child outgrowing the behavior will fix the issue. 6 is still pretty young.
ITA, I wouldn't worry. I certainly wouldn't consider a whoopin'.
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Old 12-13-2007, 11:29 AM
 
1,363 posts, read 5,719,451 times
Reputation: 890
Quote:
Originally Posted by sbd78 View Post
Don't worry, I don't think your son is emotionally behind. Many 6-year-olds haven't outgrown the tantrum phase yet. I have almost 6-year-old twin nephews and they still have the occasional meltdown/tantrum. My sister-in-law gives them time-outs or sends them to their room for the negative behavior. I think a combination of consistent disipline and the child outgrowing the behavior will fix the issue. 6 is still pretty young.
My husband is 32 and still throws time-out worthy tantrums. It may be a lost cause
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Old 12-13-2007, 11:40 AM
 
Location: in drifts of snow wherever you go
2,493 posts, read 3,959,899 times
Reputation: 692
Quote:
Originally Posted by summers19 View Post
My six year old had his birthday party yesterday. We had it at our house and he only wanted two friends to be there. These two friends brought their siblings also, so total there were six kids.
He said he only wanted two friends to be there, and yet you did nothing to stop these parents from bringing over all the siblings of the kids. I don't blame your son for being upset when one of the older kids, whom he did not even invite, broke his pinata and ruined for him what was to be the highlight of the party.

It maybe inappropriate for a six-year old to scream and carry on like that, but it was also inappropriate of you to completely overlook his simple wishes on his birthday. You put your son's needs aside because you did not want to feel uncomfortable asking these parents to only bring over one kid, not all the siblings.

I think you owe your son an apology.

greenie

Last edited by GreenMachine; 12-13-2007 at 11:54 AM..
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Old 12-13-2007, 11:47 AM
 
Location: Chicago's burbs
1,016 posts, read 4,384,733 times
Reputation: 918
Quote:
Originally Posted by GreenMachine View Post
He said he only wanted two friends to be there, and yet you did nothing to stop these parents from bringing over all the siblings of the kids. I don't blame your son for being upset when one of the older kids, whom he did not even invite, broke his pinata and ruined for him what was to be the highlight of the party.

It maybe inappropriate for a six-year old to scream and carry on like that, but it was also inappropriate of you to completelye overlook his simple wishes on his birthday. You put your son's needs aside because you did not want to feel uncomfortable asking these parents to only bring over one kid, not all the siblings.

I think you owe your son an apology.

greenie
I don't agree with this. If the boy's mother told the parent's of the children who were invited they could't bring their other children, he would have had NO party and NO friends there. What were the other parent's supposed to do, pay a babysitter to watch their other children because it was an "exclusive" party and their other children were not welcome? Tell one of their children they are invited, but the others have to stay home with a sitter because the guest of honor doesn't want them there?
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Old 12-13-2007, 11:50 AM
 
394 posts, read 1,927,719 times
Reputation: 260
Around here it would be considered extremely rude for siblings to also attend a birthday party. Maybe it is different in some areas, though.
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