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Old 01-01-2017, 01:43 PM
 
Location: 44N 89W
803 posts, read 429,798 times
Reputation: 680

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Any "made up" name (Jayden, Nevaeh, Braelyn, etc) or spelling (for example the hopefully made up Jaimz for James, or Mykull for Michael), or in general super-trendy, kre8yv names, or any last name or place name that's only been recently used as a first name (Brooklyn, Beckett, etc.).

Also on the "never" list for me are names of objects and words that have only recently become names (the aforementioned Apple, and also Miracle, Sienna, Rainbow, etc.), in addition to names used on the wrong gender (Mary, Beth, or Sue for boys, and John, David, or Michael for girls, just to name examples).

Also on the list is anything that is rising or peaking in popularity or has done so recently, whether it be the revived old-timer names such as Charlotte and Henry or the typical trendy names like Avery, Logan, and anything ending in -aden.

I'd also hesitate to name a son anything on the bottom 20 list in this article (e.g. Tony, Matthew, or Jimmy).

If I were to have one son and one daughter, their names would be Steven John (Steve) and Katherine Grace (Katie) respectively.

Last edited by YITYNR; 01-01-2017 at 01:45 PM.. Reason: typo
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Old 01-01-2017, 01:57 PM
 
Location: Florida
11,749 posts, read 5,486,246 times
Reputation: 24316
Quote:
Originally Posted by nana053 View Post
Saoirse is a traditional Irish name. It is pronounced Sheer see. It is uncommon in the US, but it is not uncommon in Ireland and people know how to pronounce it and spell it there. If you are in the US of Irish heritage, then there is no reason not to use it as a name for your child.
I can't tell you how many times I have seen the name Saoirse and wondered how it was supposed to be pronounced. Thank You!
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Old 01-01-2017, 02:07 PM
 
13,336 posts, read 21,364,792 times
Reputation: 36449
I've only come across one name in my life that made me feel badly for the holder of it. In elementary school, there was a little girl named Ursula. She's the only person who never seemed to "fit" her name. In other cases, even if it wasn't a name I liked, as I got to know people, the names some how seemed right.
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Old 01-01-2017, 02:52 PM
 
16,471 posts, read 18,499,728 times
Reputation: 16336
Quote:
Originally Posted by chiluvr1228 View Post
I can't tell you how many times I have seen the name Saoirse and wondered how it was supposed to be pronounced. Thank You!
You are welcome. I learned that from a friend who lives in Brooklyn and whose daughter is named Saoirse.
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Old 01-01-2017, 03:28 PM
 
7,446 posts, read 4,632,583 times
Reputation: 19411
Quote:
Originally Posted by nana053 View Post
Saoirse is a traditional Irish name. It is pronounced Sheer see. It is uncommon in the US, but it is not uncommon in Ireland and people know how to pronounce it and spell it there.
They do. It is SEER-sha.

Not Sheer-see.

Behind the Name: Meaning, origin and history of the name Saoirse

It would be embarrassing to be an American Saoirse who says "Sheer-see" on a visit to Ireland. This is a very good example of why you should double- and triple-check that you are pronouncing that exotic name correctly before you give it to your baby.

Last edited by saibot; 01-01-2017 at 04:49 PM..
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Old 01-01-2017, 03:49 PM
 
Location: here
24,841 posts, read 30,805,088 times
Reputation: 32481
Quote:
Originally Posted by love roses View Post
I work in a preschool, and over the years have come across some really good ones:

Alice / Titus
Goldie / Sam
June / Max
Valkyrie/ Vati
Rulie / Brogen
Pennie / Giovanni
Iris / Robert/Robbie
Violet / Grant
Elin / Ben
Audrey / Jobe
Grace/Gracelynn / Jameson
Adeline / Rylan, but it's gotten trendy
Olivia/Olyvia / Lucius, not sure I spelled it right! My neighbor named her baby that.
Jessamine / Olsen
Boudica / Wyatt, a good one but getting popular.
Baevin /


Those are just some of the most unique or not so common names I've come across. I've seen lots of Kinley's, Kennedi's, Averie/Avery's, Maya's, Makenzie's, Aiden's, Nolen/Nolan's, Hayden, Grayson, etc...
I don't find a lot of these to be particularly unique or odd, especially the ones I bolded. I certainly wouldn't group Alice, Sam, Max, or Robert in the same category as Jessamine or Boudica!
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Old 01-01-2017, 04:00 PM
 
Location: SDL/PDX/RDU
5,155 posts, read 2,749,946 times
Reputation: 5868
Quote:
Originally Posted by newtovenice View Post
A few years ago, a local pizza place had a pic of the little league team it sponsored. Aaden, Jayden and Brayden .... I laughed every time I saw it.
Back in the mid-70's I attended a Carole King concert in Boise, ID. It was an outdoor show and there were a lot of kids running around on and in-back of the stage. They were obviously the kids of the band, road crew and such. In between songs one of them was getting a little too rambunctious and King yelled "LEVI, knock that off!!!" Then she just paused and started to laugh realizing that there were about 5 Levi's attached with the show.
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Old 01-01-2017, 04:07 PM
 
Location: The Midwest
2,918 posts, read 3,297,669 times
Reputation: 5200
Aidan (only with the -an ending) is such a lovely, traditional Irish name- shame it gets lumped in with the rest of the -aden names, which I agree are quite unfortunate.
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Old 01-01-2017, 04:09 PM
 
Location: Raleigh
1,226 posts, read 1,240,145 times
Reputation: 1429
Seems I remember the late 70s lots of baby girls were named Dawn Michelle. That got old quick.
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Old 01-01-2017, 05:44 PM
 
Location: ATL -> HOU -> DAL
4,476 posts, read 3,737,235 times
Reputation: 3601
Neveah.
Katrina.
Bartholomew.
Any names that haven't been popular since the mid or early 1900s like Ethel or Elmer.
Any names of family members (grandparents and anyone of their descendants including all aunts and uncles and cousins). I'm named after my grandpa and it's just annoying. I wouldn't wanna do that to my kids.
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