U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Parenting
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 12-23-2019, 09:27 AM
Status: "Happy New Year!" (set 28 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
88,816 posts, read 105,214,528 times
Reputation: 34266

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by Mightyqueen801 View Post
Yup. Same with the Dutch, although it wasn't always that clear. My grandmother was Anna Petranella, but they called her Nellie. However, she had a younger sister who was my great-aunt Anna. I asked my father if my grandmother's real name was Anna, how could she have a sister named Anna? Well, Aunt Anna's real name was Henrietta. Never quite figured that one out.

Thankfully, I don't see many little girls being named either Petranella or Henrietta these days.
Yes, same in my dad's family. His father was John Adam and went by John. However, there was also John Harry (Uncle Harry) and John Paul (Uncle Paul). In the women it was more consistent, Maria Dorothea (Aunt Dorothy), Margaret Philaphena (sp?) was Aunt Phil, Barbara Margaret (Aunt Margaret), but then there was Anna Appalonia (Aunt Anna).

Re: Petranella, I have a friend named Ronell from South Africa. She says Ronell is actually a nickmae for Petranella and is very popular in South Africa. Sort of like "Gretchen" is actually a nickname for "Margaret".
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 12-23-2019, 09:34 AM
 
Location: X marks the spot
784 posts, read 278,694 times
Reputation: 1425
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mightyqueen801 View Post
Yup. Same with the Dutch, although it wasn't always that clear. My grandmother was Anna Petranella, but they called her Nellie. However, she had a younger sister who was my great-aunt Anna. I asked my father if my grandmother's real name was Anna, how could she have a sister named Anna? Well, Aunt Anna's real name was Henrietta. Never quite figured that one out.

Thankfully, I don't see many little girls being named either Petranella or Henrietta these days.
Not hearing the names Hester or Hortense now a days.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-24-2019, 09:39 AM
 
2,387 posts, read 872,938 times
Reputation: 4326
Quote:
Originally Posted by Katarina Witt View Post
Sort of like "Gretchen" is actually a nickname for "Margaret".
I never knew that, thanks! Always thought that Gretchen was its own standalone name, albeit of either German or Scandinavian origin.

Although my dad's family never substituted anyone's middle name for a first name, my ex-BIL was named Robert Leroy after my MIL's brother (who was still alive at the time.) The entire family called my BIL "Roy" and I had no clue that his actual name was Robert until he got engaged and I eventually got a wedding invitation that displayed his actual name; I'd known him for five years before that, lol.

My paternal grandmother went by an entirely different first name from a fairly early age: "Jane." Everyone -- family and friends -- called her that. Imagine my surprise when, decades after she died and I began researching my genealogy, I discovered that her actual name was Marie Violette Amelie (her family was French Canadian.) It still boggles my mind why anyone would prefer "plain Jane" over any of those beautiful names! I know she was already called "Jane" as a teen because I have a photo of her with "Jane age 16" written on the back in her own handwriting.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-24-2019, 12:59 PM
 
Location: Coastal New Jersey
60,110 posts, read 57,534,098 times
Reputation: 71704
Quote:
Originally Posted by maiden_fern View Post
Not hearing the names Hester or Hortense now a days.
I'm OK with that.
__________________
Moderator posts are in RED.
City-Data Terms of Service: //www.city-data.com/terms.html
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-24-2019, 01:05 PM
 
Location: Coastal New Jersey
60,110 posts, read 57,534,098 times
Reputation: 71704
Quote:
Originally Posted by BBCjunkie View Post
I never knew that, thanks! Always thought that Gretchen was its own standalone name, albeit of either German or Scandinavian origin.

Although my dad's family never substituted anyone's middle name for a first name, my ex-BIL was named Robert Leroy after my MIL's brother (who was still alive at the time.) The entire family called my BIL "Roy" and I had no clue that his actual name was Robert until he got engaged and I eventually got a wedding invitation that displayed his actual name; I'd known him for five years before that, lol.

My paternal grandmother went by an entirely different first name from a fairly early age: "Jane." Everyone -- family and friends -- called her that. Imagine my surprise when, decades after she died and I began researching my genealogy, I discovered that her actual name was Marie Violette Amelie (her family was French Canadian.) It still boggles my mind why anyone would prefer "plain Jane" over any of those beautiful names! I know she was already called "Jane" as a teen because I have a photo of her with "Jane age 16" written on the back in her own handwriting.
Yes, I like English history, and "Jane" seems to be a random nickname. There was Jane Shore, who was the mistress of Edward IV, and her real name was Elizabeth (like pretty much everyone else from that time if they weren't named Mary.) How they got Jane from Elizabeth is beyond me.

I know a woman in her 70s named Natalie, of Italian descent. I only recently learned that her real name is Emmanuela. She was born on Christmas Day, and so her family called her Natalie as a nickname because it means "the birthday of the Lord".
__________________
Moderator posts are in RED.
City-Data Terms of Service: //www.city-data.com/terms.html
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-25-2019, 12:21 PM
 
Location: STL area
1,102 posts, read 574,669 times
Reputation: 2402
Quote:
Originally Posted by Katarina Witt View Post
Oliver (#5) and Olivia (#2), (but not Olive) are quite popular in the US right now. And I hasten to point out that "Alice" is not a "quirky" name. Next year, there may be several Alices in the same class.
https://www.ssa.gov/oact/babynames/



Our daughter has a Swedish name that has several spellings, one of which is way more Swedish than the others. We used the anglicized spelling but many people use the Swedish for her, sometimes even when they know better!
One of mine is an Oliver. Very common these days. Great name. I get compliments on my boys' names all the time. He gets a kick out of the show Oliver. Listens to that song and giggles.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-26-2019, 09:02 AM
 
Location: Florida
11,928 posts, read 5,580,791 times
Reputation: 24623
My paternal grandfather was born Umberto; somehow it got changed to Vincent and even the spelling of his last name was changed a bit. The weird thing is everybody called him Jim. Seems to be common with the Italians. My paternal grandmother was born Assunta which was shortened to Sue but her relatives all called her Ruthie. Her nieces were Edith which became Rita and Marie became Mickey.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-26-2019, 09:17 AM
 
Location: Coastal New Jersey
60,110 posts, read 57,534,098 times
Reputation: 71704
Quote:
Originally Posted by chiluvr1228 View Post
My paternal grandfather was born Umberto; somehow it got changed to Vincent and even the spelling of his last name was changed a bit. The weird thing is everybody called him Jim. Seems to be common with the Italians. My paternal grandmother was born Assunta which was shortened to Sue but her relatives all called her Ruthie. Her nieces were Edith which became Rita and Marie became Mickey.
Yes! I worked with TWO different first-gen Italian men who were named Vincent and called Jim. Never could figure that one out.
__________________
Moderator posts are in RED.
City-Data Terms of Service: //www.city-data.com/terms.html
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-26-2019, 11:57 AM
 
16,493 posts, read 18,584,598 times
Reputation: 16355
Interestingly, my dad's name was Louis (and he is first generation Italian). He was called Bill by everyone who knew him.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-30-2019, 10:26 PM
 
6,151 posts, read 3,302,721 times
Reputation: 11175
Adolph
Heinrich
Joseph
Mao
Levi
Amos
Hezekiah
Zebediah
Zezebel
Lola
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply

Quick Reply
Message:


Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Parenting
Similar Threads
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

© 2005-2020, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top